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Pink pork and Trichinosis....

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by PDogSniper, Dec 2, 2004.

  1. PDogSniper

    PDogSniper

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    Only reason this came up is because my wife works at a hospital and she saw a case of trichinosis this week. Evidently the patient contracted it in Arizona but I'm not sure as to what kind of meat was comsumed...

    Having purchased a new smoker grill I've been doing quite a few ribs, indirect, low and slow. About 250/300 degrees for about 2 1/2 hrs+.

    I've noticed, as usual the smoked meat comes out a deep pink or red color, but not bloody... Last ribs I did I probed and they were 170/180 degrees....

    I know this isn't the same thing but I've cook whole pigs on a grill but not smoked per-say and the meat comes out quite differently in color...

    Someone put my mind at ease here please... I've eaten a lot of pork in my lifetime and some I know may have been rarer than it should have been but so far it's never been a problem... But I'm not about ready to have it become one...
     
  2. AAshooter

    AAshooter

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    Smoked meats come out with a pink layer. This is true for fish, beef, pork . . .

    You can usually tell since it is near the surface of the meat. With a pork roast, it is easy to see. However, with ribs it is tough since there is not much meat on them.

    Go ahead and use your thermometer. It will tell you if you are done. The pink layer is normal for smoking.
     

  3. Mild Bill

    Mild Bill Millennium Member

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    "Smoker pink" is not undercooked pink, it's cool...

    ;c
     
  4. Glockerel

    Glockerel Got Mojo?

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    Trichonosis in commercial hogs is all but unheard of these days. Chances are, if in Arizona, they had eaten an undercooked javalena.

    I always have my pork medium to even medium rare. Why ruin good meat?
    If someone's nervous about pink pork, may I suggest a candelight dinner. Works everytime. Can't be afraid of what you can't see!

    Ribs always have that pink color when smoking.
     
  5. Garweh

    Garweh CLM

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    The parasite that causes trichinosis is killed at temperatures above 137 degrees F. I cook pork to minimum of 150 degrees F. The extra 13 degrees assures me that the trichina will be killed in case of 1) uneven doneness of the meat, and 2) inaccuracy in the meat thermometer. As previously stated, trichina in commercial hogs is basically a non-issue. Today's pork cannot be cooked to well-done (unless cuts like ribs and butt cooked low and slow) and still remain palatable because of the drastically decreased amount of fat in today's pig. Rub the ribs with a dry rub before cooking and allow to "marinate" overnight. YUMMY! Search the food forum for my dry rub recipe and recipe for pulled pork.
     
  6. noway

    noway

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    {I've noticed, as usual the smoked meat comes out a deep pink or red color, but not bloody... Last ribs I did I probed and they were 170/180 degrees....

    I know this isn't the same thing but I've cook whole pigs on a grill but not smoked per-say and the meat comes out quite differently in color...

    Someone put my mind at ease here please... I've eaten a lot of pork in my lifetime and some I know may have been rarer than it should have been but so far it's never been a problem... But I'm not about ready to have it become one...}

    stop! and read below.

    The inside coloring of smoked pork or any other meats has nothing todo with how rare or done it is. Smoke from the woods changes the coloring of the meat. You are doing it right by TAKING a measure with a therometer. 170-180 is perfect. ( i perfer 180 just tobe on the safe side ). You can cook meats with mesquite wood and it would take on a reddish tint, same with hickory and most other woods. The longer you prolong the meat to smoke, more of a tint it will take on to a certain degree.

    If you get the internal temps taken to this range, then you can rest assure that all parasites would be killed. On avg, 45mins-1hr per lb is about the norm. Ribs cook much quicker due to their size and surface area.


    now go enjoy those ribs.
     
  7. noway

    noway

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    {"Smoker pink" is not undercooked pink, it's cool...}

    btw, in TX we call it the "smoke-ring"
     
  8. AAshooter

    AAshooter

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    Noway, give the quote button a try for your responses. It should make things easier for you.:)
     
  9. AAshooter

    AAshooter

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    Noway, here is an example.
     
  10. noway

    noway

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    { Originally posted by noway
    {"Smoker pink" is not undercooked pink, it's cool...}

    btw, in TX we call it the "smoke-ring"


    Noway, here is an example.}


    or do mean


    I've been on GT for about 4yrs and you are the first person telling me how to use a quote button. ;Q

    Thanks for the advice that's not needed.
     
  11. AAshooter

    AAshooter

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    Sorry, no offense intended. It just took me a year or so to figure out what that button did so I thought I would pass it on.

    Sorry for the distraction . . . back to serious stuff . . . smoking meat!
     
  12. Glockerel

    Glockerel Got Mojo?

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    Geez, I guess the old adage of "no good deed goes unpunished" is true.

    Now AAshooter, stop being nice to people!;Q
     
  13. nsb22

    nsb22 TEAM OAF

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    I spent a couple of years of smoking meats, poultry/pork/beef, in a restraurant you can take my word for it that pink is good!!! If indeed you do get trichinosis from eating pork, you may want to track down the packer of that pork and contact a lawyer. They are supposed to be treating the pork for trichinosis.

    Enjoy:cool:
     
  14. AAshooter

    AAshooter

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    Any helpful hints you can share for us amateurs? I figure there has to be some tricks of the trade.
     
  15. Garweh

    Garweh CLM

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    AA:

    IMHO, the best way to smoke meat (pork butt, ribs, turkey, duck, etc.) is on my Weber Genesis SilverB gas grill. The basic method is:

    I use a rub that is equal parts paprika, salt, brown sugar, black pepper and 1/4 part cayenne pepper (garlic powder, onion powder, etc may be added for additional flavor). I remove the membrane from the back of the ribs and liberally apply the rub (cover ribs completely) the night before cooking, allowing the ribs to sit overnight in the refrigerator. Plan on 5 to 6 hours of cooking time at 225 to 250 degrees F (LOW AND SLOW), adjust the burners to maintain this temperature (I have the front burner on medium and the back two off most of the time). You should put a pan of hot water on the grill, this provides a moist environment, helps keep the meat moist, and helps smoke to penetrate. Smoke is generated by soaking hickory chips, etc in water and wrapping the chips in foil. Place the packets directly on the coals, burners, lava rocks, flavor bars, etc. Each packet should provide about 90 minutes of smoke. You need enough chips for about 4 hours of smoke. If you use BBQ sauce, apply the last 20 to 30 minutes of cooking so as to glaze and not burn. Enjoy!

    Pulled pork takes a few additional steps. After the 6 hours on the grill, remove the pork, wrap it in heavy duty AL foil and bake in a 250 degree oven for 3 hours (place on a sheet pan-this extra step helps to tenderize the meat). Remove from the oven, shred the meat in a bowl, defat the juice that came out of the meat and add to the shredded pork along with 2 cups of BBQ sauce (commercial or homemade). Mix, serve and enjoy.
     
  16. nsb22

    nsb22 TEAM OAF

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    I agree with most everything else you said except for this last part. We cooked our meats at 250F and only in the smoker. Granted our smoker was an industrial one, but none the less. We never threw it in the oven. Straight out of the smoker to the prep table were it sat long enough to be cool enough to be handled and then cut and shred. If you ask me, it was the best pork I have ever eaten!
     
  17. AAshooter

    AAshooter

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    A recipe I have made several times. I smoke it on a Weber Smoker until it reaches temp. Usually takes most of the day (15 hours). I use the peppery vinegar sauce at the end rather than the BBQ sauce. Serve it on a roll with sliced onions and it is hard to beat.

    1 (5 to 6 pound) pork shoulder or Boston butt pork roast
    2 teaspoons salt
    10 pounds hardwood charcoal, divided
    Hickory wood chunks
    Cider Vinegar Barbecue Sauce, recipe follows (optional)
    Peppery Vinegar Sauce, recipe follows (optional)

    Sprinkle pork with salt. Cover and chill for 30 minutes.
    Prepare charcoal fire with half of charcoal in grill. Let burn 15 to 20 minutes or until covered with gray ash. Push coals evenly into piles on both sides off grill. Carefully place 2 hickory chunks on top of each pile, and place food rack on grill.

    Place pork, meaty side down, on rack directly in center of grill. Cover with lid, leaving ventilation holes completely open.

    Prepare an additional charcoal fire with 12 briquettes in an auxiliary grill or fire bucket. let burn for 30 minutes or until covered with gray ash. Carefully add 6 briquettes to each pile in smoker. Place 2 more hickory chunks on each pile. repeat procedure every 30 minutes. You will continue to cook the pork, covered for 5 hours and 30 minutes, or until meat thermometer inserted into the thickest portion registers at least 165 degrees F. Turn the pork once during the last 2 hours.

    Remove pork from the grill. Cool slightly. Chop and serve with Cider Vinegar Barbecue Sauce or Peppery Vinegar Sauce.

    Cider Vinegar Barbecue Sauce:
    1 1/2 cups cider vinegar
    1/3 cup firmly packed brown sugar
    1/4 cup ketchup
    1 tablespoon hot sauce
    1 teaspoon browning and seasoning sauce
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon onion powder
    1/2 teaspoon pepper
    1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

    Stir together all ingredients in a medium saucepan. Cover over medium heat, stirring constantly for 7 minutes or until sugar dissolves. Cover and chill sauce until ready to serve.
    Yield: 2 cups


    Peppery Vinegar Sauce:
    1 quart cider vinegar
    1 tablespoon dried crushed red pepper
    1 tablespoon salt
    1 1/2 teaspoons pepper

    Stir all ingredients together, blending well.
     
  18. Garweh

    Garweh CLM

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    nsb:

    The oven part is a short cut. Most of the smoke flavor has been absorbed by the meat in 5 to 6 hours (I usually have smoke penetration to 1/4 inch or more as evidenced by the pink ring). This does not mean that the meat is fully cooked. As AAShooter states, this can take up to 15 hours. The oven trick basically "braises" the meat to finish cooking in 2 to 3 hours. It also helps to avoid the loss of juiciness by collecting the exuded juices in the foil. I defat this juice (which is full of flavor) and add it back to the meat when I pull it. Try it, I guarantee it will not disappoint.

    AA:

    I mix a good commercial "spicy" BBQ sauce in the pork after I pull it. The hot pork absorbs the BBQ sauce and defatted juices (like a sponge). I serve it with a vinegar based finishing sauce which is similar to your vinegar BBQ sauce (only 1 Tbs. brown sugar, hot pepper flakes instead of hot sauce, 1 Tbs. pepper). I serve the pork on rolls with cole slaw and the finishing sauce on the side. The finishing sauce cuts the richness of the pork. This is basically a double whammy of BBQ flavor!
     
  19. AAshooter

    AAshooter

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    All this talk about pulled pork . . . I might just have to fire up the smoker in the next couple weeks and do one. I never considered doing both the vinegar sauce and BBQ.

    I do use the vinegar sauce to make a cole slaw that complements the sandwich pretty well.
     
  20. noway

    noway

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    The vinegar sauce method is mainly a Carolinian style. I hate bbq sauces done that way personally. I also don't believe in masking the flavor of the meats with all of that sauces and stuff.