Photoshop Question

Discussion in 'Through-the-Lens Club' started by Team Greenbaum, Dec 7, 2005.

  1. Team Greenbaum

    Team Greenbaum Millennium Member

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    I'm working with a photographer to make an 18"x24" poster and we're having some trouble preparing the image for printing. Here's his description of the problem we're having. Any help would be appreciated.

    I shot a model this past week on a black background. I did a pretty good job on lighting so I only had to adjust the levels a slight amount. I just wanted my black background dark. One of my last post processing adjustments was a soft focus using "Image Factory's" soft focus filter. I have a dell LCD and blowing it up to 200% looks great. On my customer's LCD and CRT, part of the image has a halo. The halo exists only in portions, down one arm, upper hair, and one finger. We then experimented on other monitors and found mixed results. Some monitors have a halo and others do not. Has anyone else experienced this? We printed a smaller picture and it looked great. Our concern is that the end result is to be a large poster so we don't know how it's going to print.
     
  2. DTQ

    DTQ c8h10n4o2 me

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    we need to see it.
     

  3. DTQ

    DTQ c8h10n4o2 me

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    Post a crop. Is the halo in the original non post-production image?

    Thats a starting point.

    It could just be a sharpening halo or it could be..

    Post a crop.

    Show us the image at 100% and 200%
     
  4. Glock27Girl

    Glock27Girl Glock 23 Owner

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    It would help to see a small version of the image or portion of the image for reference. Halos can be produced for a number of reasons, including during the actual capture but some are also produced during image editing. Some reasons for halos could be oversharpening, which produces a brighter line, often white, on the border of contrasting tones, such as black next to white for an extreme example. The shadow highlights tool causes a thicker, less perceptible halo in the lighter areas around a darker area. A lot of this tool needs to be applied to get a noticable halo.

    An image of the halo you're refering to, even just a magnified section of it, could help in troubleshooting the problem.
     
  5. New23

    New23

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    You can test by printing a cropped portion of the image, like printing test strips in the old darkroom days. Size the image in Photoshop to print in your desired final size. Then crop a small part of that to include some of the offending halo. Print that cropped part. Do a few small sections to try different halo parts.
     
  6. Team Greenbaum

    Team Greenbaum Millennium Member

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    Thanks for all the tips! Turns out it was caused by the soft focus filter. He re-did all his touchups without it and the results were great.