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Philippine Air Lines to collect fees for gun handling

Discussion in 'Band of Glockers' started by KevlarSix, Jul 21, 2006.

  1. KevlarSix

    KevlarSix Senior Member

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  2. batangueno

    batangueno Shock Resist

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    That would be fine as long as they don't lose my gun. :supergrin:
     

  3. jojo_G19

    jojo_G19

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  4. Allegra

    Allegra

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    It rides w/ the pilots naman and it's the guys at the erports you gotta watch out
    Dati , the civies who reg your firearm hahaplosin muna and rack the slide pag maganda baril mo. Scaring the pants of the western tourists staring at us
     
  5. asian_glockster

    asian_glockster Hook Up!!!!!!!!

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    My father went to Davao City this morning and he was shocked as hell.. He bought along three firearms because he was bringing his guns from Manila to our house at Davao City..They charged him 330 petots per firearm:crying:
     
  6. ReccaH

    ReccaH Let's Play

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    I think the gun is placed inside a special container and loaded last sa cargo hold. Inside the cargo area the bullet is more dangerous than the gun that's why its a controlled item. The fee is more on insurance purposes.
     
  7. Allegra

    Allegra

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    Controlled na ba ammo ngayon? Dati I was brought about a thousand rounds sa cebu w/ no hassle
    I thought the guns rode w/ the pilots
     
  8. jimbullet

    jimbullet

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    I brought my firearm with me when I went to Puerto Princesa. That was a month ago and during that time, there was no charge. The guns are no longer kept with the pilots but rather are all in the cargo area together with the ammo. Mind you, the airport police would rather count the ammo you carry and if you dont have a PTT or is more than 50 rds., its like they want to confiscate it. I suggest para di takaw tikim sa cargo handlers, put your guns in a guncase and insist that you would lock your gun inside the case, which in turn will be loaded together with the other guns. This will also protect your gun from rough handling as they get to be rubbed with other guns that are just on carry holsters loaded in the cargo bin
     
  9. ReccaH

    ReccaH Let's Play

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    Yup ammo is a controlled item in PAL. If I remember my dangerous goods subject right, each passenger is only alloted a max of 5kgs or 11lbs weight of ammunition to be checked in before a flight. More than that is against company policy.

    But if your 4 in a group and your the only one bringing ammo your allowed to bring 20kilos! :supergrin:


    HTH.
     
  10. mikol

    mikol

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    saw one time when i took the flight from cebu to manila(going back to saudi),
    BITBIT LANG NOONG STEWARD ANG BARIL HANGANG DOON SA ME CLAIM COUNTER SA LABAS NG PINTO NG Domestic Airport :shocked: :freak: :freak: :alien:
    it's a glock17. ni hindi man lang binalot or naka holstered.
    waited to see who's gonna claim. me kumuhang mama, tkaka niya nilagay doon sa holster nya na nakasukbit pa sa kanyang sinturon. :brickwall: :nono: woww...mali!!
     
  11. charlie-xray

    charlie-xray Gunpowder Adik

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    HELL NO WAY

    PAL is the most dirty most corrupt airline in the asia pacific next to PIA and Bangladesh airline. I would not entrust my boomer with them.

    P lane
    A lways
    L ate

    Kaya nga natanggal service niyang mga arroganteng yan dito sa saudi arabia, imagine naka-tatlong complaint ako about their ego-centered and ego-maniac GURANG na stewardess to no avail, kaya nung i-announce na aalis na yang PAL sa saudi arabia ang sagot ko BUTI NGA.
     
  12. orimar3

    orimar3

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    Much like most guys here, I too bring firearms & ammo on my travels. Because of what I do, it's even necessary for me to bring as much as a dozen firearms and more ammo than the airline would care to have. Solutions are found and at the end I get what I want.

    I'm not a big fan of PAL for many reasons but what I do appreciate from them is the fact that they give me the least hassle when travelling with guns and ammo. Unless you've flown other airlines internationally, you simply don't know how difficult it could be.

    The point I'm making is that rather than bash PAL, we should just accept the fact that a handling fee must be paid. P300 is cheap compared to what others charge. Remember that the airline does not force you to bring your gun and ammo when you travel, that's solely your decision. And on the premise that it is necessary for you to do so, be content with the fact that at least you are able to do so at a cost which would hardly put a dent on your wallet. I'd rather pay for a reasonable amount for service than a draconian policy of absolutely no guns or ammo allowed for air travel.
     
  13. st. matthew

    st. matthew c_w@_u_need_2_c

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    guys,ilang rounds ng 9mm ang 5 kgs or 11 lbs of ammo?
    thanks:)
     
  14. orimar3

    orimar3

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    5 kilos equates to roughly:

    300-350 rounds of 125 gr. 9mm
    200-250 rounds of 180 gr. .40SW
    200-220 rounds of 230 gr. .45 ACP

    The above are estimates depending on the packaging.

    Also, the limit of 5 kilos is an IATA ruling (not just PAL) by which all airlines are supposed to abide by. In certain cases, airlines may choose to waive it or impose more restrictions.

    An extreme example is Garuda Airlines, where for domestic flights within Indonesia, there is no limit on firearms but restricts you to only 12 rounds of ammo.
     
  15. st. matthew

    st. matthew c_w@_u_need_2_c

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    thanks orimar3:)
    what about paperwork? pag may ptc,are you good to go or meron pang additional requirements na kailangan?
     
  16. orimar3

    orimar3

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    For local travel, the only paperwork you need is a copy of your firearms license and either a PTCFOR or PTT.

    For international travel, you would need a copy of your firearms license plus an authorization from the PNP allowing you to enter & exit the country with firearms & ammo (sort of like an international PTT). In addition, you will need to fill out a Customs Declaration form which will prove that the you are re-importing firearms that you have exported out of the country. Lastly, you will need to coordinate the carraige of arms & ammo with the airline you are flying and usually they will require that you submit the documents mentioned above plus the authorization or license for the arms & ammo issued by your country of destination.
     
  17. st. matthew

    st. matthew c_w@_u_need_2_c

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    for local travel lang:)
    thanks again orimar3
     
  18. isuzu

    isuzu

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    If I may ask, when was the last time you travelled with PAL? I took PAL from Vancouver to Manila in May and it was a rather good flight. IMHO, service was better than Northwest which we always take when travelling to the US because of the convenience of connecting flights to my brothers in Tennessee.

    The flight attendants were very courteous and helpful. They announced that food, drinks and snacks were always available at the pantry even after they served meals. And they were super efficient. They were always available during the 13.5 hours of the flight. The seats of the A340 was more comfortable than the B747 400. BTW, this was in economy class.

    The decision of PAL not to fly to Saudi Arabia was a wise decision with regards to PAL's profitability. Competition on Saudi Arabian routes is so stiff that PAL would rather concentrate and improve revenue-generating routes such as MNL-Las Vegas-Vancouver which is always full; and not too many airlines have this route.

    With regards to the age of the flight attendants, they're not actually old. They just look old because of years of flying. Cabin air is so dry that it dehydrates your body (and skin) so much, and altitude plays a big factor in ageing your skin. That's the price you pay for being a cabin crew.

    A smile as memorable as historic PAL flight


    By Nikko Dizon
    Inquirer
    Last updated 05:53am (Mla time) 07/31/2006

    Published on page A1 of the July 31, 2006 issue of the Philippine Daily Inquirer

    ANY STORY about the history of Philippine civil aviation would not be complete without the memory of her smile.

    Rebecca Verzosa was the only Filipino and lone flight attendant on the first flight of Philippine Airlines (PAL) across the Pacific 60 years ago today.

    As the flight attendant of that historic DC-4 journey, Verzosa thus became a pioneer in what has become one of the most popular, in-demand and well-paying jobs today.

    Yet, nothing much is known about Verzosa, except for the scant details the airline managed to put together through the years.

    One of the few mementos PAL has of Verzosa is a black and white picture showing her wearing an attendant’s cap, a collared white blouse, and a brilliant smile captured on camera for eternity.

    That smile might have been one of the things that inspired a PAL slogan years later exhorting travelers to “Come fly the friendly skies.”

    On that July 31, 1946, flight were four other crew members -- all Americans, including the two pilots.

    Finding Verzosa, or at least her close relatives, for the 60th anniversary of PAL’s first crossing of the Pacific to the United States was an unfulfilled, aching wish of the people who organized the celebration this year.

    For them, the anniversary of the first flight of a local airline to the United States would have been an excellent chance to give due recognition to Verzosa and her service to PAL.

    Moreover, an account from Verzosa of her experience as a pioneering Filipino flight attendant would have been a remarkable addition to the history not only of PAL but of local civil aviation as well.

    Verzosa would be around 85 years old today.

    At that age, she would have a lot of stories to tell, said Jonathan Gesmundo, editor of PAL’s corporate magazine, PALiner.

    Gesmundo himself seems to be a walking repository of historical data and trivia about PAL and Philippine civil aviation history, what with his wealth of knowledge gained from research he has done at the Filipinas Heritage Library, the National Library and the University of Santo Tomas Library, among other libraries.

    But to Gesmundo, Verzosa has become an elusive subject.

    “The most recent information we got, and this was a few years ago, was that she was supposedly living in the US,” Gesmundo told the Inquirer.

    Homesick passengers

    PAL chartered its first flight to the United States from a company called Trans Ocean, after a dock strike in the US West Coast prevented US ships from sailing to the Philippines to pick up homesick American soldiers.

    There were not enough US planes and ships then to transport the Americans back home.

    The flight was an ordeal for the crew that included Verzosa, and for the passengers consisting of some 40 American soldiers eager to go home with the end of World War II.

    The DC-4, a surplus military aircraft, was not known for comfort. Passengers sat on what were called “bucket seats” -- no armrests and no backrests.

    5-foot-tall beauty

    According to PAL, the plane “could make just over 200 miles per hour at cruising speed, was unpressurized, and could not fly much higher than 10,000 feet.”

    Verzosa, believed to be just 5 feet tall, not only made sure her passengers were comfortable during the flight, she also cooked meals “when meal times came en route.”

    “She also had to keep the lavatory clean, not a pleasant task when the passengers became airsick,” PAL said in its media release.

    At that time, airsick bags were unheard of, Gesmundo said.

    But hadn’t the US soldiers flown helicopters and planes during the war?

    41-hour flight

    “Yes, they did. But not for 41 hours with just four stopovers,” Gesmundo said.

    Verzosa was also on the flight that returned to Manila, but this time, thankfully, there were no passengers on board.

    Laughing, Gesmundo said that if he ever met Verzosa, he would not hesitate to ask her some naughty questions, like: “Did any pilots court you?”

    “It’s common those days, you know,” Gesmundo quipped.

    Time of reconstruction

    If anything, Versoza proved that being a flight attendant could be a career at a time when the main concern in the Philippines was the reconstruction after the war, Gesmundo said.

    “It was July 1946, the new republic has just been established and granted independence by the Americans. It was an era of reconstruction. Literally, rebuilding their homes and their businesses was on top of their minds,” Gesmundo said.

    Being a flight attendant was an American influence, he added.

    At that time, then PAL owner Andres Soriano, who was a Spaniard who became an American citizen, would scout around for flight attendants.

    “Soriano or some American pilots would see a mestiza and ask her if she would be interested to become a flight attendant. It wasn’t for them to apply,” Gesmundo said.

    Prize in a beauty pageant

    Soon, becoming a flight attendant became prestigious. So much so that, Gesmundo said, he discovered in one of his research that one postwar beauty pageant offered for its second prize “becoming a trainee for cabin attendant for PAL.”

    First prize was a PAL ticket to any domestic destination, and third prize was getting any job in the airline.

    Verzosa spent some 10 years as a flight attendant, eventually becoming manager in charge of cabin crew training.

    She also spent more than 10 years doing office work at PAL, Gesmundo said.

    She showed the way

    Verzosa showed that being a flight attendant was not just being a “glorified or a glamorous helper” on an airplane.

    Flight attendants are “hurt” when they hear that nasty tag, Gesmundo said.

    He said being a flight attendant was also not only about charm and grace.

    As Verzosa showed on that 41-hour flight 60 years ago, it is a lot about grit, hard work and selflessness.