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Overlooked Stephen King Series

Discussion in 'The Book Rack' started by bobcleanG17, Mar 2, 2006.

  1. bobcleanG17

    bobcleanG17

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    Any one read all of or any of the Dark Tower Series by Stephen King? The first book is called The Gunslinger, then The Drawing of Three, The Wastelands, Wizard and Glass, Wolves of Calla, Song of Susannah, and finally The Dark Tower. I am about to finish Wizard and Glass (book 5) and have absolutely loved this series. If anyone here is a Stephen King fan (or maybe never read any of his work) this is a must read!!!!
     
  2. dave27

    dave27 Millennium Member

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    Yep, read them all last summer. Well, finished them all last summer. I reread the first 4 because it had been years since I read those. Really emjoyed them until about midway through book 6. Didn't care for 7 at all. King is very good at coming up with concepts and imagery. He just can't write an ending to save his life. Kind of wished he'd left the Dark Tower series unfinished actually. My favorites are The Wastelands and Wizard and Glass. Oddly enough, I didn't care for W&G the first time I read it, couldn't put it down the second.

    I'm re-reading The Stand now just because Cell was kind of a let down.
     

  3. beamnice

    beamnice

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    Somehow I missed six, thinking that I'd read it and skipped to seven, now I have to backtrack. But I've really enjoyed it; I really like how King is able to make the characters identifiable; though I thought "Susanna/Odetta/Detta/Mia" was a bit over the top.

    If you liked the Dark Tower, might I suggest "Imagica" by Clive Barker. Same kind of premise, though a lot more involved and dense. One volume in hardback, two in paperback.
     
  4. dave27

    dave27 Millennium Member

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    Cool, I'll have to check it out.
     
  5. lastsonofgilead

    lastsonofgilead Gunslinger

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    My favorite series of books ever. Period.

    That series is what made me start writing in the first place.

    I can't possibly explain how impactful that series has been on me.

    But my username here should be a clue ;)

    "First come smiles, then lies. Last is gunfire."
    -Roland of Gilead

    Best.

    Chris.
     
  6. beamnice

    beamnice

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    I agree, a very good run of books. I'm curious, what type of writing are you doing, Chris? I've started to dabble a bit myself and have a two-month sabbatical planned this summer during which I'll be trying to put the finishing touches on my first attempt. Its a metaphysical examination of the interplay between coincidence and "providence" in the midst of a good (I hope) old fashion mystery. Please share!

    Rob

    "I shoot with my eye. I aim with my hand. I kill with my heart."
     
  7. elcuchillo

    elcuchillo

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    And here I thought this was gonna be a forum for just gun books LoL.

    Anyway, I looooove this series, as far as I got anyway. I need to pick up the last 3. Somehow they managed to sneak them out when I wasn't looking.

    And Chris, the first time I saw your user name, these books were the FIRST thing I thought of.
     
  8. lastsonofgilead

    lastsonofgilead Gunslinger

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    Thanks guys.

    Rob: My book...where to begin? It started as a short story, and has taken on a life of its own. I'm about 3/4 finished with it, and I have the first 1/3 of the next one written in my head. The book is about a guy who dies in a horrible accident that was his fault. He is given a chance to balance his karmic debt and has to go back and take responsibility for what he has done. It is heavily influenced by The Divine Comedy. There are Angels and Demons and a lot of gunsmoke. Influences include the work of Joseph Michael Linsner, Frank Miller, and NIN.

    About your book, I love mysteries. I don't know if I could write one, but I love to read them.

    Best.

    Chris.
     
  9. beamnice

    beamnice

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    Hey, that sounds like a great storyline, Chris, nice and complex, the way I like 'em. If you want a ghost-reader, keep me in mind, my minor was English and I'd be gentle, but real if you wanted and opinion. If not, I'll just look for it on the NYTBSL.

    Salud'

    Rob
     
  10. lastsonofgilead

    lastsonofgilead Gunslinger

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    Thanks Beam!

    I'll revisit this thread when I get the first draft completed. My goal was to have it done by end of 06, but I hope to have it done before then.

    I started really writing, at Columbia College in Chicago. We had an awesome program and a big part of that was constant feedback. But for the last 6 years I have been writing in isolation, and I always welcome feedback.

    I'll holler at you when I have something resembling a finished story :)

    Best.

    Chris.
     
  11. bobcleanG17

    bobcleanG17

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    honestly i am a little surprised that i got any replies here at all... i am about to finish book 6 (Wolves of the Calla) and so far i am gonna have to go with Wizard and Glass as my favorite. here are two clips from my all time favorite passage... sorry the second is so long.. i think this actually came from book 1.

    "Shall there be truth between us, as two men? Not as friends, but as equals? There is an offer you will get rarely... Only Equals speak the truth, that's my thought on't. Friends and lovers lie endlessly, caught in the web of regard. How tiresome!"

    The universe… is the Great All, and offers a paradox too great for the finite mind to grasp. As the living brain cannot conceive of a nonliving brain-although it may think it can-the finite mind cannot grasp infinite.
    The prosaic fact of the universe’s existence alone defeats both the pragmatist and the romantic. There was a time, yet a hundred generations before the world moved on, when mankind had achieved enough technical and scientific prowess to chip a few splinters from the great stone pillar of reality. Even so, the false light of science (knowledge, if you like) shone in only a few developed countries… Yet, despite a tremendous increase in available fact, there were remarkably few insights.
    “Gunslinger, our many-times-great grandfathers conquered the-disease-which-rots, which they called cancer, almost conquered aging, walked on the moon-“
    “I don’t believe that,” the gunslinger said flatly.
    To this the man in black merely smiled and answered, “You needn’t. Yet it was so. They made or discovered a hundred other marvelous baubles. But this wealth of information produced little or no insight. There were no great odes written to the wonders of artificial insemination-having babies from frozen man sperm-or to the cars that ran on power from the sun. Few if any seemed to grasp the truest principle of reality: new knowledge leads always to yet more awesome mysteries. Great physiological knowledge of the brain makes the existence of the soul less possible yet more probable by the nature of the search. Do you see? Of course you don’t. You’ve reached the limits of your ability to comprehend. But never mind-that’s beside the point.”
    “What is the point, then?”
    “The greatest mystery the universe offers is not life but size. Size encompasses life, and the Tower encompasses size. The child, who is most at home with wonder, says: Daddy, what is above the sky? And the father says: The darkness of space. The child: What is above space? The father: The galaxy. The child: beyond the galaxy? The father: Another galaxy. The child: Beyond the other galaxies? The father: No one knows.
    “You see? Size defeats us. For the fish, the lake in which he lives is the universe. What does the fish think when he is jerked up by the mouth through the silver limits of existence and into a new universe where the air drowns him and the light is blue madness? Where huge bipeds with no gills stuff fit into a suffocating box and cover it with wet weeds to die?
    “Or one might take the tip of a pencil and magnify it. One reaches the point where a stunning realization strikes home: The pencil-tip is not solid; it is composed of atoms which whirl and revolve like a trillion demon planets. What seems solid to us is actually only a loose net held together by gravity. Viewed at their actual size, the distance between these atoms might become leagues, gulfs, aeons. The atoms themselves are composed of nuclei and revolving protons and electrons. One may step down further to subatomic particles. And then to what? Tachyons? Nothing? Of course not. Everything in the universe denies nothing; to suggest an ending is the one absurdity.
    “If you fell outward to the limit of the universe, would you find a board fence and signs reading DEAD END? No. You might find something hard and rounded. As the chick must see the egg from the inside. And if you should peck through the shell (or find a door), what a great and torrential light might shine through your opening at the end of space? Might you look through and discover our entire universe is but part of one atom on a blade of grass? Might you be forced to think that by burning a twig you incinerate an eternity of eternities? That existence rises not to one infinite but to an infinity of them?
    “Perhaps you saw what place our universe plays in the scheme of things-as no more than an atom in a blade of grass. Could it be that everything we perceive, from the microscopic viruses to the Horsehead Nebula, is contained in one blade of grass that may have existed for only a single season in an alien time-flow? What if that blade of grass should cut off by a scythe? When it begins to die, would the rot seep into our own universe and our own lives, turning everything yellow and brown and desiccated? Perhaps it’s already begun to happen. We say the world has moved on; maybe we really mean that it has begun to dry up.
    “Think how small such a concept of things makes us, gunslinger! If a God watches over it all, does He actually mete out justice for a race of gnats among an infinitude of races of gnats? Does His eye see the sparrow fall when the sparrow is less than s speck of hydrogen floating disconnected in space? And if He does see… what must the nature of such a God be? Where does he live? How is it possible to live beyond infinity?
     
  12. beamnice

    beamnice

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    ;) ;)

    I'll be in Chi-town for three weeks this summer working on my doctorate (don't tell the other GTers, don't want to lose respect) I'll be doing a lot of reading then, and I hope that primes the pump to use the rest of my sabbatical to write. I look forward to reading your manuscript if you give me the honor.

    Rob
     
  13. DonGlock26

    DonGlock26

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    I just bought The Gunslinger. I have to finish A Clash of Kings first though. I alternate between two series of books. It helps stop me from rushing to the endings.
     
  14. lastsonofgilead

    lastsonofgilead Gunslinger

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    The first book of the series is a fast read...I usually finish it in a day. They seem to get longer and longer, and also better and better as the series commences.
     
  15. msymms

    msymms

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    Ditto!! to all.
     
  16. douglevy

    douglevy Ka-Tet of 19

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    Ditto. Ditto. And Ditto.

    To be honest, I think it is a blasphemy to call this an "overlooked" King series, considering that the Dark Tower series is actually Stephen King's life's work. In fact, the majority of his OTHER books are all somehow related to this series.

    While I'm still rather young at 23, I've spent almost half my life contemplating this series. I've read the first four books four times and the last three twice. Besides my wife and my dog, nothing makes me happier than to dive into four thousand pages worth of Roland's world and follow his tet from a safe distance in the hours before I fall asleep and the quiet hours before my wife wakes up on the weekends.

    Be sure to enjoy the journey along the path of the Beam. Most times, the journey is better than the inn.