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I read that a turkey "keeps cooking" and the temperature will increase after the bird is taken out of the oven - will gain 10 degrees they say - mine don't do this -


161 out of the oven - did you see it keep going up as it rested or do you like raw turkey?
I believe this is where the outer part of the turkey is hotter than the core and that heat radiates inward as the whole bird is equalizing. If your probe is at the deepest part of the meat I would trust it. If it's resting with no covering that outer hotter part will likely send that heat outward rather than pushing much inward. At least it seems that way. I don't plan for much increased temp in the rest, maybe a few degrees but that's it.
 

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I read that a turkey "keeps cooking" and the temperature will increase after the bird is taken out of the oven - will gain 10 degrees they say - mine don't do this -

I had a thermometer in the thigh and it was around 180 so I pulled it out of the oven - breast said a little over 160 so I figured it was done - I covered it in foil and then watched the thermometer in the breast drop from down to 159 then 158 - so rechecked the thigh and discovered my oven thermometer was not placed very well and the thigh was really closer to 170.

So I repositioned the oven thermometer and put it back in the over for 30 more minutes.

I read one - How to cook a turkey - that said you can take it out at 150 and it will still reach over 160 but I can't see how -

When cooking a turkey for a large group - the last thing I want is an undercooked bird where everyone gets sick - the old USDA recommendation for turkey was 180 - but I think 165 is the new standard -

I hit 166 in the breast - 175 in the thigh (after putting it back in the oven) and even though I still covered it with foil - the temp only went up like .5 degrees before it started dropping -

161 out of the oven - did you see it keep going up as it rested or do you like raw turkey?
Normally I'll see the temp increse a couple degrees in meat but since I had to carry the bird 100 ft to the kitchen and got sidetracked, by the time I checked with my instant read the temp had dropped. given the color and texture of the breast meat I don't think I was even close to done. I just deboned and finished off in the oven, dry and pissed is not a good way to start dinner.
 

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I just rub the bird with olive oil/course sea salt - a slurry if you will. This seals the bird so it cooks in its own juices. I set the bird on top a rack and in a baking pan.

325F for 20 minutes per pound. Split the time into two segments - 2/3 and 1/3.
After 2/3 of the cooking time is up, place aluminum foil over the bird. When done (check temp) remove and let stand for 20-30 minutes.

Beautifully golden brown, juicy and tender. You only open the oven twice during the process - once to put the aluminum foil on after 2/3 of the cooking time. Again when the bird is done.

Example: We did a 14lb bird this year. That's 280 minutes or 4:40 - 14 x 20 = 280. 2/3 of 280 is about 3:06. Put the foil over the bird and finish cooking for 1/3 of the 480 minute total cook time - or about 1.33. Obviously the math varies with the size of the bird. But its an easy calc.

Soo. Rub the bird with EVOO and sea salt. Put in the oven and set the timer for the first 2/3 cook time. Watch football and drink beer until the timer rings. Put the foil over the bird, reset the timer for 1/3 the cook time, repeat football and beer. The part she likes best is she knows exactly when the bird will be ready to serve. So she can plan the other dishes.

Making pancakes from scratch is much more time consuming than than cooking a turkey. Actually, making pancakes from a mix would take longer than getting a turkey into the oven.

I get the cleanup job. I keep telling her to use a disposable aluminum roasting pan. She claims they heat/cook differently than her stainless pan. Who cares? They will both get hot. It's a lot easier to just throw the damned thing into a garbage bag and walk away.
 

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Honestly, I’ve been in charge of cooking the turkey for years and I’m always disappointed. It always is dryer than what I expect.
Today, I’m trying the spatchcock method without a bag.

Also, what do the brown paper bags do?

For those of us who are terrible cooks . . . the bags makes it easier to move the turkey from the oven . . . to the garbage pail.
 

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I just rub the bird with olive oil/course sea salt - a slurry if you will. This seals the bird so it cooks in its own juices. I set the bird on top a rack and in a baking pan.

325F for 20 minutes per pound. Split the time into two segments - 2/3 and 1/3.
After 2/3 of the cooking time is up, place aluminum foil over the bird. When done (check temp) remove and let stand for 20-30 minutes.

Beautifully golden brown, juicy and tender. You only open the oven twice during the process - once to put the aluminum foil on after 2/3 of the cooking time. Again when the bird is done.

Example: We did a 14lb bird this year. That's 280 minutes or 4:40 - 14 x 20 = 280. 2/3 of 280 is about 3:06. Put the foil over the bird and finish cooking for 1/3 of the 480 minute total cook time - or about 1.33. Obviously the math varies with the size of the bird. But its an easy calc.

Soo. Rub the bird with EVOO and sea salt. Put in the oven and set the timer for the first 2/3 cook time. Watch football and drink beer until the timer rings. Put the foil over the bird, reset the timer for 1/3 the cook time, repeat football and beer. The part she likes best is she knows exactly when the bird will be ready to serve. So she can plan the other dishes.

Making pancakes from scratch is much more time consuming than than cooking a turkey. Actually, making pancakes from a mix would take longer than getting a turkey into the oven.

I get the cleanup job. I keep telling her to use a disposable aluminum roasting pan. She claims they heat/cook differently than her stainless pan. Who cares? They will both get hot. It's a lot easier to just throw the damned thing into a garbage bag and walk away.
For the people that use foil part of the time it seems like there’s a split. Some put the foil on to start and then finish without the foil - Which is what I do. Some start the bird with no foil and then cover the foil at the end like you do. I think I’ve done it both ways had better results by taking the foil off at the end.
 
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For the people that use foil part of the time it seems like there’s a split. Some put the foil on to start and then finish without the foil - Which is what I do. Some start the bird with no foil and then cover the foil at the end like you do. I think I’ve done it both ways had better results by taking the foil off at the end.
I saw a woman on a TV cooking show one time talking about cooking a turkey. Turns out she wrote a book called "Talk Turkey to Me". It's humorous and informative. But anyone can write a book - this woman worked on the help desk for Butter Ball Turkey for 16 years. Lots of stories and experience. I just follow the woman's instructions - easy and perfect results every time.

Here's what she said about roasting a bird in an open pan... Use a thermometer in the thigh. When it reads 180F the bird is done. She used to use the 20 minute/pound method. I suppose for legal reasons she now recommends a thermometer. I use 20/lb to get a rough estimate but also use a thermometer.

See my post above for bird prep with EVOO and Sea Salt. This is a quote from her book regarding tenting... "Do not baste or open the oven door for the first two-thirds of the cooking time. When two-thirds of the cooking time has passed, the turkey will be a light golden brown. Place a tent of light weight aluminum foil over the breast and continue cooking." "... By roasting uncovered first, you achieve a beautiful, appetizing, brown color. If you were to reverse the process, covering the turkey first and removing the foil after two thirds of the cooking time, the right color would be harder achieve. Your turkey could end up being an unappetizing paleface even though the meat thermometer says it's done. Cooking it any longer to achieve the ideal mouth-watering color would dry the meat out. So it's best to start out with the turkey uncovered and then place the foil lightly over the breast to prevent from overcooking and over browning".

"Talk Turkey to Me" by Renee S. Ferguson.

Give the EVOO/course sea salt, 20 minute/lb a try - you'll be amazed at the wonderful results. Not to mention the ease of prep. Did I mention I use a disposable aluminum baking pan. I put a stainless rack in the bottom of the pan to keep the bird off the bottom. When the feast is over, clean the carcass and throw the pan. Like I said above - it's easier than making pancakes.

Note to Bill: It says to place a tent over the breast - that's the turkey's breast. One time I grabbed a sheet of foil and put it over my "assistant's" breasts. She failed to see the humor... It's a guy thing Hannie...
 

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A couple of years ago, I had a turkey injected, ready to fry......................that night, I ended up in the hospital (had been feeling bad for several days) Anyway, the wife went ahead and did it in the oven, it turned out fabulous. Not sure but what it was as good as I've ever had.
I would like to do it that way again, this time in a bag.
 

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Take an apple cut it in half - place it inside the cavity cut side up - way down by the neck area.

As the turkey cooks the apple helps keep the breast moist -
My mom would put a full lemon inside. Same idea. Didn’t impart any flavor.
 
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I injected with a mix of melted butter, poultry seasoning, garlic and a little turkey broth. I loosely stuffed the cavity with apple, celery, garlic colves, onion, fresh sage, rosemary and thyme. Rubbed garlic and melted butter on the dryed skin. Preheated oven to 425 then turned down to 325 when the turkey went in. When it had a nice golden color I tented the breast and continued to cook until my probe read 157 in the deapest point. Then pulled and rested.

This blog post has some great tips:

https://blog.thermoworks.com/turkey/turkey-temps/
 

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Brine the turkey.
I've smoked and grilled turkeys with good results.
The fried turkey was disappointing but that may be my fault because of bad temp prob placement, i will try again.
Best results used alton brown ethod. 30 min @500 the cover breast area with foil triange @350 until breast hit 161. I used two temp probes this time.
I did that last year.

This year I butterflied the turkey and did a 4 day dry brine.

Turned out really well, even though I overcooked it a bit. My probe alarm went off at 155. I stuck a thermapen in a few spots to make sure and it read 145.

I didn't realize it at the time, but I stuck the thermapen through the bird and was getting air temp.

So I cooked it to 170. Still moist and flavorful.
 
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