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Opinions on buying the "newest and best" or "average/better than average".

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by Frozen_Tex, Jan 2, 2010.

  1. Frozen_Tex

    Frozen_Tex

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    So this has been something that I have been wondering about and I wanted to hear ya'lls input on this. For products like suppressors, scopes (mostly electronic), etc would it be wise to buy the "newest and best" or settle for the "average/better than average". It seems like these technologies are continually improving almost year after year and what is "newest and best" wont stay that way for long. So does it make more sense to save some money for the "average/better than average" and then in the future buy the "average/better than average" again or just continually buying the expensive "newest and best"?

    For clarification I'm not talking about buying a new suppressor, scope, etc EVERY year but more like 5...10...15+ years down the road. I know that expensive doesn't always mean best, but the better technologies tend to cost more money.
     
  2. Novocaine

    Novocaine

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    "newest and best" is a contradiction of terms
     

  3. 20South

    20South

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    Depends on what it is. I tend to be fine with average/better then average - at least when it comes to optics on most things. I do not shoot enough, nor have enough on the line to justify the additional expense. For my equipment I would put my life or my family's life against, I will figure out a way to save for the best I can afford. Eventually I will drop significant money on an aimpoint for one of my ARs, but I sure won't/can't do it for them all. Same line of thinking would go for any type of competitive shooting I might consider as well.

    I also know that most of this equipment is already capable of outperforming my own skills and the marketing hype and luring slicks are not going to make me reach any deeper into my pockets then I want to. So I guess from my perspective, the short answer is "it depends".
     
  4. napp32

    napp32

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    IMO, if your skills can outperform the equipment, get better equipment. OTOH, if your skills are the limiting factor, why waste the money on more capable equipment?

    I see people violating this premise a lot....especially, at shooting ranges and golf courses. :whistling:
     
  5. sigcalcatrant

    sigcalcatrant

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    Can you explain that?
     
  6. silentpoet

    silentpoet

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    I prefer proven technology when it comes to firearms.
     
  7. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

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    For suppressors, I suggest you buy the best you can afford. You will never be able to sell it and get your money out of it. The difference between the best and average is great.

    For computers and electronics, I suggest figuring out what you want to accomplish and buy that or just a little bit better, because there is always something better just around the corner and the price drops so quickly, you can upgrade on a regular basis as you need to do something more.

    For optics, it depends. I have had a couple scopes and scope mounts die. This usually happens at the worst possible moment. So I tend to over buy at this point and I plan on living with the scope forever.
     
  8. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

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    As far as rifles, you will never know how good you are until you shoot a rifle which is much better than you. Then you know exactly how much you suck and can immediately can see improvements or issues.
     
  9. Mongosafari

    Mongosafari El diablo verde

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    I don't need the the so called newest and best.
    But I do demand the best tried and true equipment/firearms or accessories.
     
  10. RedHaze

    RedHaze Handgunner

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    At least buy quality. But don't buy something beyond your means.
     
  11. PlasticGuy

    PlasticGuy

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    I agree. There have been some good advancements in arms technology in the last 50 years, and particularly in materials (advanced metal alloys and polymers). However, you'd be better armed with a 90 year old 1911, 60 year old AK47, and 50 year old Remington 870 than with many of the guns made in the last decade.

    Optics and lights are a different issue, and the technology there is much more fluid. I do spend money for top of the line optics and lights, but I do wait until they have been common LE or Military issue for a year or so first. I like to let somebody else work out the teething issues for me, but I want one as soon as the "beta testing" is over. Wait much longer than that and it's out of date before you get home from the store.
     
  12. mitchshrader

    mitchshrader Deceased

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    if the issue is metal to metal fitting, vintage firearms can be better than new ones. for optics, to stay affordable, look at 1-2 year old tech, well rated. for computers and cameras, 6 months to a year, same way.

    BUT, if it's one of them ol' nasty rattletrap smiff wheelies, you call me up, cause I'm an approved smiff recycler and will dispose of it safely and cover all the recycleing fees, too. I'm just friendly like that..
     
  13. Novocaine

    Novocaine

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    Newest means unproven.
     
  14. Frozen_Tex

    Frozen_Tex

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    Some great responses guys! I originally wanted to focus on more accessories than the firearms themselves. Within the accessories to be even more specific. For example... I want to buy and Eotech. Do I get the older one that has worse battery life but has been "proven" to work or a newer version with better battery life but has not necessarily been "proven". The reason I put "proven" in quotes is because I feel that Eotech has a good reputation for producing good products both older and newer. However the electronics in the newer models may have glitches so that particular model may not have "proven" to be as reliable than an older model.

    I didn't think of how hard transferring or selling a suppressor could be. Another reason to save up more and get a model with better noise reduction and just shoot the crap out of it.

    As far as electronics and cars go...I'm a modder so I'd be happy buying something and then modding it to my specs.

    There is some good stuff here so lets keep it going!
     
  15. Aurora

    Aurora

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    It generally takes five to ten years to expose and correct the flaws in many items. You'll be the beta tester if you buy before then.

    Most of the time,..... but not always.

    V.
     
  16. PlasticGuy

    PlasticGuy

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    Not so much. One of the major reasons for building the newest EoTech variants was to turn the battery sideways. They say that's to reduce overall length. The real reason is that the front/back oriented batteries could bounce off of the connectors during recoil and shut the optic off. Also, they had some battery drain issues. In fact, the battery in my EoTech 552 would drain slowly even when turned off. I learned that is a common problem with them. Maybe that has been fixed with the newest variants, and maybe it hasn't.

    I stick with the Aimpoint M3 and M4 on my rifles, and the Aimpoint T1 Micro is on my "proven" list now also. I don't like the reticle as much as the EoTech, but at least I can trust an Aimpoint to work when I need it.
     
  17. ctaggart

    ctaggart

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    I can. My grandfather was using a toaster in 2004 that he bought new in the 1950's. That toaster was made to last. A lot of products nowadays are viewed as disposable that shouldn't be.
     
  18. hogship

    hogship Patriot Extraordinaire

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    Good one!

    I bought the first Aimpoint red dot scope to hit the market. This was back in the mid 1980's. That thing was a monster, and the view was about as big as a nickel. It WAS the latest and greatest.......but, far from being the best by today's standards. At the time, it was the best......only because it was the ONLY choice you had!

    hog