close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

On the right track wirelessly?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by pascal, Jul 10, 2006.

  1. pascal

    pascal

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Messages:
    786
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello,
    I am going to upgrade to DSL. Been reading up on routers and such.
    Am currently thinking of 802.11g with NAT firewall, WPA2 @ 54mbs, with DSL/Cable and DialUp connections. Does this sound reasonable/doable for a medium budget. Am I missing anything.
    Mainly concerned about security, reliability, ease of use/installation, connectivity at home, privacy and price in that order. Can anyone suggest a trusted brand and model??
    Thanks for all suggestions.
     
  2. fastvfr

    fastvfr Ancient Tech

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2001
    Messages:
    2,344
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    SW Oregon
    The Netgear SuperG WGR614 802.11g is a good unit.

    After the initial setup, you will need to enter the router's firmware (explained in the manual) to set up the password, turn on NAT and disable SSID Broadcast...but save the SSID disable until all the machines on the network are travelling properly.

    Good luck!

    PS. Here's a link to Amazon's router listing page.
     

  3. pascal

    pascal

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Messages:
    786
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey fastvfr,
    Would you be able to type slower (explain in slow english) what that all meant? I am going to try to set one up myself as I don't want to spend $100 for BestBuy to do it. I am going with Bellsouth. I guess I get the DSL modem from them. Is there anything you might be willing to share about what is necessary for a good installation???
    I've read some reviews on that model and they seem sketchy. Poor service and reliablilty as well as connectivity are mentioned. I take it that you have used it with success.
    Thanks for the advise all ready given and the help in the future.
    I hope!!!
     
  4. fastvfr

    fastvfr Ancient Tech

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2001
    Messages:
    2,344
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    SW Oregon
    First off, yes, I have used it with success many times. In fact, I have never had a prob with it at all. I guess others weren't so lucky.

    Remember, though, that most of the people who were happy with it didn't take time to post about that, while those who were upset did. See how that works? That happens with most consumer goods these days.

    Okay, at this point, it sounds like we need to find out what type of DSL modem they will set you up with.

    Then all I have to do is go to the manufacturer's site and grab the manual (you might get one with the kit, but I won't be able to see it from here :rollsmiley: ), and then I will walk you through setting it up properly.

    It's really pretty simple...and it all predicates on not forgetting to do any important stuff.

    By the way, routers are very simple to work with. If you mess something up, just push the little RESET button in with a pencil for thirty seconds or so and its firmware reverts to a like-new state.

    Another thing: many DSL modems have both a wireless antenna and NAPT/NAT firewalls you can enable.

    Let's just see what you get to connect with and go from there.

    Best regards,

    Eric
     
  5. pascal

    pascal

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Messages:
    786
    Likes Received:
    0
    Many many many many many MANY thanks!!!! + !!!!!! I'll try to get the manual. Didn't know that about the modems. Still waiting to connect the transfer the phone line. Bellsouth let me know they were running late (3 days so far). Really thank you for the offer to help, I hope we can get it accomplished. Take Care Sir.
     
  6. HVAC-TEK

    HVAC-TEK

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2005
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    0


    Don’t be fooled by outdated myths. Turning off SSID broadcasts doesn’t work anymore. For my class paper I did a report on wireless security (im a computer forensics/ information security student) I went around my town testing wireless networks, looking for security flaws.

    I used a simple laptop computer and modern wireless hacking software available for free on the internet. The modern software can dig down into the network packet, and even though the ssid broadcast isn’t blaring the ID number anymore, it’s sent inside of the network packets themselves along with a lot of other header information.

    Your only real defense is using strong encryption and avoiding the outdated WEP protocol in favor of WPA.

    I can give Pascal a little advice based on what I saw.

    1) Never leave the default name and password on any of your routers or access points. These defaults are widely known and each brand is listed in many books.
    2) Use modern equipment that supports the WPA protocol. Many discount/cheap cards and routers rely solely on the crack able ancient WEP protocols.
    3) Before you do anything...check the web for firmware updates.
    4) Wireless is a two way street. When you connect to someone’s access point, they connect to you. You get free access to their internet, and they get full access to your hard drive. (There are simple commands for this) To prevent problems encrypt important folders using EFS which is built into XP, and 2000.

    (Encrypting too much stuff will destroy computer performance so only encrypt files you really have to.)

    k
     
  7. fastvfr

    fastvfr Ancient Tech

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2001
    Messages:
    2,344
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    SW Oregon
    It's not an outdated myth or anything, HVAC, it's merely part of the settings changes we make to protect our clients.

    And pascal said nothing about security--for all we know he lives out in the country aways, or already read some of the other postings here related to hardening your AP.

    That never did work all by itself, IMNSHO, but for the average leech that just wants some free broadband, that usually is enough to protect your bandwidth since your network will not appear on their Available Networks list when they refresh it.

    Unless the leech in question resorts to cracker tools, as you pointed out. That's when DHCP throttling, MAC authentication and other elements are put into play.

    Kindest regards,

    Eric
     
  8. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2003
    Messages:
    1,426
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    For most stable home networks wouldn't that be one of the recommended settings (once the initial configuration bugs are wrinkled out)?
     
  9. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2001
    Messages:
    26,698
    Likes Received:
    2,017
    Location:
    Indiana
    If Security is any concern at all, set up a traditional Wired Network. Running Cat6, etc, isn't near as hard as one might think. Especially if you're on a basement/crawl space.

    I went through this same thing not to long ago, and in the end, just didn't trust the security/reliability of Wireless.

    Good luck
    IGF
     
  10. biblefreak

    biblefreak

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2003
    Messages:
    179
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    West Texas
    I have nothing but bad things to say about the Netgear SuperG Unit. I am pretty computer savvy and have set up a bunch of wired and wireless networks with many different brands of equipment. The Netgear SuperG unit is Junk. Go with Linksys, more specifically the WRT54GL. It runs Linux as its OS. You probably won't find it from any of the brick and mortar stores, but if you can find a WRT54GS with Speedbooster AND a serial number CGN6xxxxxxxx it is the same thing. STAY AWAY from the CGN7xxxxxxxx as they changed the OS on the unit and lowered the onboard memory.

    Hope this helps.

    Justin
     
  11. fastvfr

    fastvfr Ancient Tech

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2001
    Messages:
    2,344
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    SW Oregon
    Hmmm...

    Linksys products, be they PCMCIA WiFi cards for laptops, AP/routers or PCI radio cards are the ones I used to use, until the failure rate became suspect.

    It looked to me like this was the WiFi equivalent of Armalite's Eagle Arms division--Cisco probably just wanted to make money while also distancing themselves from the ensuing PR/CS fiasco.

    And that's when I switched to Netgear.

    What problems did you have with them, Justin? Specifically?
     
  12. HVAC-TEK

    HVAC-TEK

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2005
    Messages:
    82
    Likes Received:
    0
    IN not trying to be insulting or "Know-it-all-ish" with my previous post.

    Shutting down the SSID doesn’t hurt, but the danger is in the false sense of security it gives people.

    My small list of suggestions is nothing more than common mistakes I see every day in our industry.
     
  13. pascal

    pascal

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Messages:
    786
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hello again to All!,
    Finally got the phone line switched over after three weeks. Can now order the Bellsouth DSL. They send the modem in a week supposedly. Have read more on wireless networks and I have a few more ;-) questions.
    First is that I have become interested in a D-Link DI-634M. It is MIMO and 2XR and 108g. I assume this means that it will have extended range and can go 108Mps with other proprietary hardware cards. It states on the package that it is WPA-PSK, but online the description mentions WPA2 and WPA2-PSK. These are the current tops for security, yes , no?? The price is on sale $69.99 which in Compusa is only $10 more than a 802.11g regular. Does this seem like a solid performer and a good price. I live in a 2 story with concrete floors and thought the MIMO might be a good idea for the future.
    Is it safe to go online with just the DSL modem through my onboard LAN connection initially. Using ZoneAlarm and Avast currently. Hoping to get the modem up then dive in with the router. Right now I'll only be using the router for security and later for the network.
    As always any thoughts/opinions welcome.
    BTW what is the correct way to connect with the modem when the dsl is down (most secure), Bellsouth gives a free dial-up account for that eventuality. Thanx
     
  14. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2001
    Messages:
    26,698
    Likes Received:
    2,017
    Location:
    Indiana
    Personally, I'd never use DSL/Cable w/o a hardware firewall/router, but thats just me. It might be tempting, etc, but there are way to many internet nasties out there. You've waited this long, it wouldn't be much longer than to wait for a router to be delivered. I've had my router hooked up since pretty much the install tech walked out the door, and its detected so many probes, etc, I'd hate to think what all might happen w/o it.

    I have no real experience with D-Link, but their reputation is fairly solid. Like I said, unless you absolutely have no way to run Ethernet, I'd suggest using a wired network, it is 100x more secure.

    Here's a thread where several chimed in to give me a hand...

    IGF
     
  15. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2003
    Messages:
    1,426
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    It's not just you. I wouldn't run it any other way.
     
  16. pascal

    pascal

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Messages:
    786
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks IndyGunFreak, hwyhobo, fastvfr, HVAC-TEK and biblefreak! I apologize for not previously acknowledging your input. My situation will be in a townhouse, no crawlspace, neighbor but a wall away on both sides. Since I'm new to this I apologize also for the simplistic questions.
    I intend to have the router hardwired to my main computer. Is this possible? The wireless is for future expansion and it's firewall. I am again interested in security/privacy (maybe overly so). May initially add a hardwire lan (existing/not connected) to my other computer to try out linux and the net (any opinions on a good linux distribution??), in the same room. I would also like to hook the dial-up through the router/firewall, is this possible?
    Alot of good info in this thread so far! If you all can indulge me further maybe I can make an informed decision.
    Is a dial-up inherently less dangerous than a DSL. I am constantly getting pings/port scans and "internet noise" now, almost 2000 in like 5 days, 40 of which were high risk!
    The DI-634M came back fairly high on a review on "Tom's Network" site (don't know how accurate/relevant). Does using a 802.11g on a 108g WLAN slow the whole lan down. I've read that if a neighbor with "g" or "b" connects, it slows your whole lan down. So many questions, so little time. Thanks thanks Thanks!
     
  17. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2001
    Messages:
    26,698
    Likes Received:
    2,017
    Location:
    Indiana
    http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=1632013&CatId=373

    Trust me on this, you can never be "overly" interested in security/privacy. I admit, my understanding of Wireless Routers/Firewalls is pretty minimal, so verify with someone more "in the know".

    From the looks of the particular router that you referred to(Linked above), it looks like it has 4 RJ45 Lan ports, this would seem to suggest that it will support hardwired and wireless setups. So my guess is, yes, you can hardwire your PC to the router. My Netgear router works perfectly with 2 PC's and an X-Box in the family room. Again though, as I mentioned, I had no problem pulling Cat 5 cable to the devices. I don't really understand why you'd want to run Dial up through the router, as once you've got the router, you can share your high speed connection with any device configured with the router, or did I misunderstand that question?

    Do a search for any of Washington DC's Linux threads, he has helped me a ton. I've found I really like Ubuntu and PClinuxOS.

    Hope that helps..

    IGF
     
  18. pascal

    pascal

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Messages:
    786
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey IndyGunFreak,
    My question about the dial-up was solely for when the DSL might be down. Cautious? I purchased Ubuntu live and install. Barely played with the live. How hard is it to get it online? Will definitely look up the threads you suggested. I am guessing that configuring Linux can't really be done until I full install it. Thanks for the response.
     
  19. IndyGunFreak

    IndyGunFreak

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2001
    Messages:
    26,698
    Likes Received:
    2,017
    Location:
    Indiana
    It was gravy to get online for me. Ubuntu(and most of the other Linux Distros), automatically detected my firewall settings, IP, etc, and configured my Internet connection. There was one version that I couldn't get online with, but I can't remember which one it was. I tried and tried, and for some reason, no matter what I did, despite following all instructions, etc, could never get it online. I think it might have been Vector, or something like that. Again, DC is the source for any of your Linux concerns.

    Dial up for when DSL goes out? I've never had a problem with cable going out, so I guess I've never felt the need to be "that" prepared. There are some DSL providers that provide an x amount of dial up hours included with your DSL, so if you're traveling you can dial in. I however, don't rely on my internet connection for buisness, etc. Its strictly entertainment, so if it went down for some reason, I probably wouldn't go into convulsions for at least a day. ;)

    IGF
     
  20. pascal

    pascal

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2006
    Messages:
    786
    Likes Received:
    0
    No more bites on my networking huh?!? I'll try to ask more specific questions one at a time :cool:. Thanks so far though!!!!!
    pascal