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My first Lt still carried a blackjack in his back pocket when I started. Long since forbidden, but he was so salty I guess no one was willing to take it away from him.

I heard him say once that the current chief was in diapers when he started policing. He had to be 65-70 years old when he retired. In uniform and in the street the entire career.

I just miss the days if wearing gloves on duty. Touch screens killed it. I used to wear Hatch or Damascus leather frisk gloves the entire shift. I remember almost everyone always had their gloves on back then.

They weren’t very durable and I had to replace them every year or two and a new pair would always dye your sweaty hands black the first few shifts you wore them until they broke in.

Ahhhh......memories.......

I still have them in my patrol bag, but if they’re not on when the call goes out you likely won’t have them on when you need them. They took a minute to squeeze into.

Now all I see is new guys stopping to put latex gloves on just to handcuff a dink. Germs I guess, but kinda gives away you’re next move. I dunno if the academy is teaching that now or if the new kids are just germaphobes, but I break them if that habit if I’m training them.

If you can see he’s covered in poo or blood I get it, but every single time you put hands on someone......??
With all the nasty diseases out there, I don't blame anyone for gloving up before touching. I've lost count of how many times I got a nasty cut on my hands or arms and I got covered with the subject's blood. Getting a blood draw every three months for a year to see if I've been infected is not fun.

I've been hands on and had new officers roll up on me all excited, and I've ordered them to take BSI precautions before they helped me out. I've done this way too long. It's just a job, I don't need an error to make it a life sentence.
 

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With all the nasty diseases out there, I don't blame anyone for gloving up before touching. I've lost count of how many times I got a nasty cut on my hands or arms and I got covered with the subject's blood. Getting a blood draw every three months for a year to see if I've been infected is not fun.

I've been hands on and had new officers roll up on me all excited, and I've ordered them to take BSI precautions before they helped me out. I've done this way too long. It's just a job, I don't need an error to make it a life sentence.
I get it but it really telegraphs your next move big time.
 

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I was in FTO and on a call for service where I had to take the call from a senior officer who was dispatched as primary. I noticed the senior officer kept looking at my brand new shiny badge with a ‘patrolman’ ribbon 1/4 down from top. The older badges didn’t have any ribbon and they looked old-school cool. We ended up trading badges after that call, and I wore it from then in. It is now in my retirement shadow box.
 

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"Cynical Little me"
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Probably my keepers. Also I have my original 686 duty holster, speed loaders, speed loader pouches. I keep an original size 31 waist uniform pant around just to remind my self, yes, I was once a fit 20-something love machine and not always an old tub of Lard.

My kid wants the 686 and I'm tempted to give him it.
 

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My stuff is all pretty new, as am I still. My oldest (and I think the coolest) piece of equipment is one I don't even carry with me... I have a call box available to me at almost every major intersection. I'm yet to find one with a working phone in it, but they're still such a cool piece of history with countless stories attached to each one. It took 5 years and getting on the motorcycles to be issued a call box key (they stopped issuing them years ago to general patrol), and I cherish that key and all it represents. Outside of that, the oldest thing I have is probably my Harley, but we're updating our fleet for next year.

Sent from my SM-N975U using Tapatalk
 

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Unfair Facist
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View attachment 632236 View attachment 632240

I have the slap jack in my desk drawer. I sold my iron claw, but this is just a pic of what they looked like. The iron claw (come along) was still in use in the late 60's in some departments.
These were some of the equipment used in the days gone by.

When I was younger, the "ball and chain" was used for the chain gangs, and work details.

Swivel Holster for revolver with ammo loops.

View attachment 632376
What a blast from the past, we still had iron claws in our inventory when I started.

Remember when some officers with the bullet loops decided to make them look pretty by using nail polish on the ammo to make them nice and shiny? (And often killing the primers in the process?)

Not that they ever shot those rounds. I can recall some of the belt loops of the old timers when we finally started replacing ammo,we had to pry the rounds out of the belt loops with a screwdriver they were so old a corroded.
 

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I had my Baltimore
I blaster nightstick u till I fianally retired in 2009 I bought it in 1973. I still have it and my slapjack and a cuffs. They all still work
 

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First issued mag light. I carried it over 20 years and retired it a few years before I retired. Most of the finish is gone and the end cap is pretty worn. It served me well and currently resides in a tool bag in my truck.
My first Maglite issued at the Police College over 21 years ago.

Carried it every late and night shift. Upgraded with a LED bulb a few years ago.

Will be carrying it again in a couple of months after my next (and hopefullly final) operation on my guts.

The ASP replaced the wooden baton about 1999 and the PR24s have been in and out of favor as authorised items for years. (Currently out of favor except for those on specialist public order units.

 

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©South Fla 2019
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4,019 Posts
I carried the same pair of S&W Airweight cuffs for my whole career. I bought them when i bought my original gun belt and Model 19. The last 5 years or so, I had to keep an eye on them as everybody wanted them. I also carried an aluminum PR-24 until they issued me an ASP. I still kept the PR in the cruiser.
 

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"Old Bill"
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Old, worn and stained, but I still wear it to Glock GSSF matches.
hat.jpg
 

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JAFO
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My ASP expandable baton from 1983; I haven't carried it since 2001, but I still have it and the first basketweave holder I was issued.
 

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Time to Go....
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I wore a 5-11 boot knife in a plastic scabbard that slid onto the inside of my duty boots.

Short,fat knife with an oxygen tank wrench hole in the middle. That got a lot of use. I can't begin to guess how many seat belts, rope etc. I've cut with this knife. I'm guessing here, but I think I had it for 18 years of my 38. Just a guess, but what a great tool. It was easy to keep sharp, I think I used it to pry things apart on occasion. The knives they have now would just break.
 

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" Fast is fine but, accuracy is everything"
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I have my Grandmothers Handcuffs from her 28 years as a Police Officer. My Grandfathers Cuff key and my Dads academy pin. Carried them all with me each and every shift. My youngest son now carries his Great Grandparents cuffs and key. Remarkably they are still in great shape. Lost the cuffs once they got mixed up at the jail one night. Luckily I had them engraved with my name on them. Took a couple shifts to figure out who had then but I got them back.
 

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"Old equipment" got me to thinking.

I just dug this out of a drawer. Haven't seen it in over 40 years.

IMG_3143.JPG


1960 walking post in the Baltimore Ghettos.
 

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©South Fla 2019
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4,019 Posts
I carried the same pair of S&W Airweight cuffs for my whole career. I bought them when i bought my original gun belt and Model 19.
I stand corrected. The oldest piece of equipment that I carried, that originally wasn't mine, was a call box key given to me in about 1986 by an old salty sergeant. Call boxes went out in the early 60s and I asked if we had any around. He found one and gave it to me and I carried it just because I wanted to. So I would imagine it was at least 70-80 years old when I retired. It rests now in my shadowbox.
 
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