NYC: 20 years later - Happy land murderer up for parole in 2015

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Gallium, Feb 2, 2010.

  1. Gallium

    Gallium CLM

    Messages:
    28,685
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2003
  2. bocephus549

    bocephus549 Bo Knows.......

    Messages:
    6,299
    Likes Received:
    50
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2002
    Location:
    Tennessee
    I'm guessing he wont make parole. Doesn't really matter the world is ending in 2012.
     

  3. HerrGlock

    HerrGlock Scouts Out CLM

    Messages:
    23,804
    Likes Received:
    261
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2000
    One gallon of gas did WHAT?

    Yeah, a gun is the deadliest weapon. Unnnnhuhhhh.
     
  4. Gallium

    Gallium CLM

    Messages:
    28,685
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2003

    Another guy set fire to a baby carriage, pushed it in a hallway, and killed 5 people in Bklyn this weekend.

    At some-point in his drunken stupor he had a change of heart, and saved one baby and another child.
     
  5. texanredraider

    texanredraider

    Messages:
    624
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Location:
    DFW, Texas
    From Wikipedia: "González was sentenced to 174 twenty-five year sentences, to be served concurrently. It was the most substantial prison term ever imposed in the state of New York. He will be eligible for parole in March 2015."


    I'm going to go out on a limb and agree that he will not be granted parole.
     
  6. HerrGlock

    HerrGlock Scouts Out CLM

    Messages:
    23,804
    Likes Received:
    261
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2000
    Manson's come up for parole every year for quite a few years. We'll see.
     
  7. Gallium

    Gallium CLM

    Messages:
    28,685
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2003

    If case you missed it, he is serving those 174 twenty five year sentences CONCURRENTLY, as is, all of them at the same time.

    What do you think is going to happen come 2015? (I honestly don't know, so I'm asking!)

    'Drew
     
  8. Gallium

    Gallium CLM

    Messages:
    28,685
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2003
    HG,

    Manson was sentenced to death, then his sentence was commuted to life in prison.

    Mr. Gonzales was sentenced to 25 years.

    Great difference.

    'Drew
     
  9. seanmac45

    seanmac45 CLM

    Messages:
    8,196
    Likes Received:
    9,475
    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2000
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    I worked that case. Ran the ID section set up for relatives with interpreters in 1 PP.


    The amount of misery and grief that man caused is incomprehensible.

    He should die in prison. If he gets out I wager he won't last long.
     
  10. Mrs.Cicero

    Mrs.Cicero Wayward Member

    Messages:
    5,160
    Likes Received:
    1,640
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2004
    Location:
    far from home
    Concurrent sentences - another example of what is wrong with this country and it's "justice system".

    Mrs.Cicero
     
  11. HerrGlock

    HerrGlock Scouts Out CLM

    Messages:
    23,804
    Likes Received:
    261
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2000
    Yup, I know. CA did away with the death penalty and it went to life. CA brought back the death penalty and they could not recommute it.

    But they're both going to come up for parole.

    One thing I like about the Federal stuff, no parole.
     
  12. HerrGlock

    HerrGlock Scouts Out CLM

    Messages:
    23,804
    Likes Received:
    261
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2000
    He's not going to get out. I doubt he ever does until full sentence is over.
     
  13. Gallium

    Gallium CLM

    Messages:
    28,685
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2003

    Slightly off topic...do the feds give time off for "good" behavior?

    'Drew


    edit, since we cross posted...what does 174 twenty five year sentences served concurrently means?Looks to me like he's already done 19-20 years...

    'Drew2
     
  14. HerrGlock

    HerrGlock Scouts Out CLM

    Messages:
    23,804
    Likes Received:
    261
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2000
    Not that I'm aware of. What you're sentenced to is what you're gonna do.

    Depends on what the law states as minimum for XXX sentence and what can be concurrent versus what must be added. It could be that concurrent means it's exactly as if he does a single 25 year and is elegable for parole after 5/6th or something of his sentence is done or it could mean that (5/6X25)X174 is minimum time before parole hearings. Dunno.

    Bruté?
     
  15. HerrGlock

    HerrGlock Scouts Out CLM

    Messages:
    23,804
    Likes Received:
    261
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2000
    If you were sentence after 1997, you're doing your whole sentence:

    http://www.justice.gov/uspc/history.htm
    In May 1976, the Parole Commission and Reorganization Act took effect. This Act re-titled the Board of Parole as the United States Parole Commission and established it as an independent agency within the Department of Justice. The Act provided for nine commissioners appointed by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate, for six year terms. These included a chairman, five regional commissioners, and a three-member National Appeals Board. In addition, the Act incorporated the major features of the Board of Parole's pilot reorganization project: a requirement for explicit guidelines for parole decision-making and written reasons for parole denial; a regional structure; and an administrative appeal process. The Youth Corrections Division of the Board of Parole was eliminated and its duties absorbed by the Commission.

    Eight years later, the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984 created a United States Sentencing Commission to establish sentencing guidelines for the federal courts and established a regime of determinate sentences. The Chairman of the Parole Commission is an ex-officio, non-voting, member of the Sentencing Commission. The decision to establish sentencing guidelines was based in substantial part on the success of the U.S. Parole Commission in developing and implementing its parole guidelines. On April 13, 1987, the U.S. Sentencing Commission submitted to Congress its initial set of sentencing guidelines, which took effect on November 1, 1987. Defendants sentenced for offenses committed on or after November 1, 1987 serve determinate terms under the sentencing guidelines and are not eligible for parole consideration. Post-release supervision, termed "supervised release," is provided as a separate part of the sentence under the jurisdiction of the court.

    Under the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984, the United States Parole Commission retained jurisdiction over defendants who committed their offenses prior to November 1, 1987. At the same time, the Act provided for the abolition of the Parole Commission on November 1, 1992 (five years after the sentencing guidelines took effect). This phase-out provision did not adequately provide for persons sentenced under the law in effect prior to November 1, 1987 who had not yet completed their sentences. Elimination of, or reduction in, parole eligibility for such cases would raise a serious ex post facto issue. To address this problem, the Judicial Improvements Act of 1990 extended the life of the Parole Commission until November 1, 1997.

    The Parole Commission Phaseout Act of 1996 again extended the life of the Parole Commission for the same reason. This Act authorized the continuation of the Parole Commission until November 1, 2002. In addition, it provided for a reduction in the number of Parole Commissioners - to two Commissioners by December 31, 1999, and one Commissioner by December 31, 2001 - and required the Attorney General, beginning in 1998, to report to Congress annually on whether it was more cost effective for the Parole Commission to continue as a separate agency or for its remaining functions to be transferred elsewhere. The Attorney General has reported each year that it is more cost effective for the Parole Commission to continue as a separate agency.
     
  16. Mrs.Cicero

    Mrs.Cicero Wayward Member

    Messages:
    5,160
    Likes Received:
    1,640
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2004
    Location:
    far from home
    "Concurrent sentences" means they are all served AT THE SAME TIME (starting on the same day), not consecutively. Therefore, a judge can sentence you to one 25 year term for one murder, or 10 terms of 25 years for 10 murders to be served concurrently, and either way you serve 25 years are you're out. Or you could be sentenced 5 years for one crime and 25 for another, to be served concurrently, and you will get out in 25. (Ignoring the good behavior, and parole issues for simplicity). Once in a blue moon, a judge will actually have the balls to sentence a criminal to consecutive terms (instead of concurrent ones). That means if you are found guilty of 10 crimes and receive 10 sentences of 25 years to be served consecutively, you are in for 250 years. Generally speaking, it has to be pretty heinous for consecutive sentences. My personal opinion is that a criminal cannot pay for multiple crimes with the same time. That's like me paying for for 5 Happy Meals with the same $3.99. McDonald's would be getting ripped off. The cretin who murders 87 people ought to be paying 87x more time than the cretin who murders one person. JMHO.

    Mrs.Cicero
     
  17. Gallium

    Gallium CLM

    Messages:
    28,685
    Likes Received:
    19
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2003

    So Mrs. C, he's out in 2015 then?

    'Drew
     
  18. Marc1956

    Marc1956 CLM #66

    Messages:
    1,832
    Likes Received:
    5
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2005
    Location:
    Atlanta, Georgia
    Perhaps if he is released, some of the families of the victims should offer up a toast. A gallon of gas and a box of matches should do just fine....IMHO
     
  19. vafish

    vafish

    Messages:
    16,743
    Likes Received:
    226
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2003
    Location:
    Commonwealth of Virginia
    From the Wikepedia article:

    The way my math works 25 years from August 19, 1991 is August 20, 2016.

    His parole only gets him out 1 year early, my guess is it will be denied, but he'll get out in 2016, his sentence is over and according to the courts his debt to society is paid.

    Although I think there is something wrong with the Wikipedia article. If you look up his inmate information his maximum sentence expiration date is "LIFE". I think his sentences were consecutive, not concurrent.


     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2010
  20. vafish

    vafish

    Messages:
    16,743
    Likes Received:
    226
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2003
    Location:
    Commonwealth of Virginia
    I just checked some other places, his 87 prison sentences are to be served consecutively or in other words a total of 4,350 years.

    I edited the Wikipedia page to correct it.

    I doubt he'll be let out on parole in 2015.