NY: Women plane crashes. Ran out of fuel. Injuries not critical.

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Gallium, Mar 29, 2010.

  1. Gallium

    Gallium CLM

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    I swear, if my wife flew aircraft, this JUST MIGHT have been her. :wow::faint::wow:





     
  2. aircarver

    aircarver Descent Terminated Silver Member

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    Been operating Cherokees a long time....

    Only time I ever ran out of fuel was deliberately on one tank to calibrate 'how empty is empty' ? (The other tank had fuel) Which raises the question... she ran both tanks out of fuel ?....:shocked:
     

  3. GVIFlyer

    GVIFlyer Senior Member

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    Somewhere in the air.
    Did you do this airborne?
     
  4. aircarver

    aircarver Descent Terminated Silver Member

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    Yep.
    (with a lot of altitude and an airport handy)
     
  5. M2 Carbine

    M2 Carbine

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    I guess the pilot did something right if she got it down without critical injuries.
     
  6. Master T

    Master T

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    Sounds like my wife. Low fuel light has to come on before refueling, and then the how many miles to empty has to be low. I got in her Car and it said 2 miles till empty. The nearest Gas station is 2 1/2 miles. I just got the 5 gallon gas can for the generator and put some in it. Didn't want to even think about trying to make it.

    Glad the girls in the aircraft are OK!
     
  7. JPNH

    JPNH

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    Wow, I hope they weren't flying from Fairport, that's less than 70 miles from Syracuse.. talk about a miscalculation.

    Glad they landed somewhat safely.

    J
     
  8. aircarver

    aircarver Descent Terminated Silver Member

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    A Cherokee's tanks should outlast just about anybody's bladder.....:headscratch:




    :supergrin:
     
  9. stevelyn

    stevelyn NRA Life Member

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    They don't do a "pre-flight" before they drive their cars, what makes you think they would do any different for an airplane?
     
  10. robin303

    robin303 Helicopter Nut

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    So much for the rule of having 45 minutes of reserve fuel on board. :faint: Silly FAA rules. :whistling:
     
  11. GT4494

    GT4494

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    So much for the REGULATION of having 45 minutes of reserve fuel on board.

    Fixed it for you...:wavey:
     
  12. PEC-Memphis

    PEC-Memphis Scottish Member

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    Doh ?
    So much for the REGULATION of having 45 30 minutes (day VFR) of reserve fuel on board.

    Fixed it for you...:wavey:
     
  13. Guessinator

    Guessinator

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    Ha. I knew of an instructor who took off with a student and ran out of fuel just 15 minutes later. They landed on I-40 in Oklahoma. No injuries or damage to the plane.

    You want to hear about a bad day? My instructor took out three Piper Tomahawks without ever leaving the ground. I was a lineman for the FBO. Instructors didn't get paid unless they flew. He had not flown for a week due to 15 inches of snow.

    The runways and most taxi ways finally cleared, but all the planes had to be dug out of the snow. He had me dig out one and he and his student headed for the runway. The right landing gear hit a huge clump of ice and tilted the plane and the prop hit the ground. He parked it in front of the hanger and had me dig out another Tomahawk out of the snow.

    While taxiing with the second tomahawk, the wingtip struck the nose cone of our third remaining tomahawk putting a big dent in it. The plane they were in had it's right wingtip shattered and left the nav light dangling from the end of the wing by it's wire still working.
     
  14. TuxthePenguin

    TuxthePenguin

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    The question I'm asking is what in the world is she doing outside of the kitchen?
     
  15. airmotive

    airmotive Tin Kicker

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    Oh since we're going to have fun at the expense of female pilots....
    (mind you, I have many more stories about male pilots than female pilots; I just happen to know this woman. She's a flake. She's also a CFII!!!)

    The pilot spent 1 1/2 hours prior to the flight brushing snow from the leading edges of the airplane's wings, but had left the remainder of snow pushed back on the wings. On takeoff, when the airplane reached an altitude of 300 feet agl, the airplane's stall horn activated. The pilot lowered the nose of the airplane to prevent a stall, but the stall horn continued to sound. She then executed a 180-degree turn back toward the runway, but was unable to reach it, and landed hard in a field adjacent to the airport. A witness, a Federal Aviation Administration Designated Pilot Examiner, saw the airplane taxiing through the ramp area and recalled that both of the airplane's wings were nearly covered with 4-inch tall chunks of snow and ice. The witness also reported that there was at least a 1/4-inch layer of ice and snow on the wings when she arrived to the scene of the accident. In a written statement, the pilot reported that she, "...failed to adequately remove some snow from the top of the wings." After the accident, the pilot voluntarily sought and received training regarding frost, icing, and snow and its effects on aircraft performance.

    Now, I also know the witness in the above report: Her name is Linda Mathias and she was my DPE for both my commercial and instrument check rides. She's an excellent pilot.
    The accident pilot did not spend 1 1/2 hours cleaning snow from the plane. I talked to her later (I worked for her banner towing company briefly (until I found out who I was working for!))...she thought the snow would just blow off during takeoff.

    Amazing...747s won't takeoff with frost on their wings. This CFII took off in a Cessna 172 with FOUR INCHES of snow/ice on her wings.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2010