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Since the sbr I want is not available, I'm thinking about building one. I've heard noveske barrels are supposed to be good, but no firsthand knowledge.
Who has one and how do you like it? Accuracy? Any bad chambers or bores? I'm looking at the 8.5" 300blk if it matters to anyone. I just want a reliable gun with decent accuracy(2moa or better).
Thanks
 

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Several local guys had issues with their Noveske barrels. Like the threads at the muzzle not being concentric with the bore, janky barrel extensions that were mismatched with uppers.
 

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I've owned two and found them reasonably accurate but not outstanding. Honestly, my PSA MG Steel barrel made by FN and my CHF barrels from BCM have shot as well for a lot less dough. The Niveske barrels are also thick and heavy compared to many competitors

Assuming we are talking the SS version they come with some special cleaning instructions.

You can't go wrong with a Noveske barrel but you CAN buy a barrel as good for less.. JMHO after owning two.
 

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I think they're about on par with any other high quality stainless barrel.

They're high, but they come with a pinned lo-pro gas block and gas tube, they're also finished with a nice matte bead blast, so that really does help to even out the cost difference.
 
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They're high, but they come with a pinned lo-pro gas block and gas tube, they're also finished with a nice matte bead blast, so that really does help to even out the cost difference.
This is true. The cost of a gas block plus having it drilled and pinned would be pushing $100. But of course many folks have no problem using a set screw with a dimpled barrel which any amateur can do with a portable drill and a vise.
 

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I've owned two and found them reasonably accurate but not outstanding. Honestly, my PSA MG Steel barrel made by FN and my CHF barrels from BCM have shot as well for a lot less dough. The Niveske barrels are also thick and heavy compared to many competitors

Assuming we are talking the SS version they come with some special cleaning instructions.

You can't go wrong with a Noveske barrel but you CAN buy a barrel as good for less.. JMHO after owning two.
Ever since John Noveske died, quality has taken a hit, and it's known. I'm fortunate to own a rifle from when he was alive. His cold hammer forged barrels made from "machine gun steel" were top notch. Also from the factory, I've never had a tighter rifle. When I first took it home, I literally had to tap it with a rubber mallet to the get upper and lower apart, it was that snug.

The quality dropping is a known issue about 2 years back and they have since hired a new person to be in charge of quality control. I've been hesitant to buy their newer offerings, though I've handled their new infidel rifle, and man is that baby sweet. Aesthetically it's pleasing to the eye, ergonomics is just right, then the AR platform is so common that it'll feel that way but the slim NSR rail feels great in hand, and price is a little high, dealer was asking ~2600

I've since switched to seekins for all my current builds, but would love to go back to noveske if they ever got their gen 3 lowers back in stock!
 

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Noveske 14.5” Afghan barrel. 10-shot group at 100 yards. Extreme spread: 0.941”.








Noveske 16” Recon barrel. 10-shot group at 100 yards. Extreme spread: 0.81”.








Noveske 18” SPR barrel. 10-shot group at 100 yards. Exrtreme spread: 0.732”.








Noveske 20” DCM barrel. 10-shot group at 100 yards. Extreme spread: 0.726”.







....
 

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Accuracy Evaluation of a Noveske 16” N4 Light Barrel









I’ve posted short reviews of Noveske N4 Light barrels in the past, so for this article we’re going to take a more in-depth look at the Noveske 16” N4 Light barrel. For starters, Noveske’s nomenclature of “Light” for this barrel is somewhat misleading/confusing. When most shooters hear the term “light- weight” in regard to AR-15 barrels, they think of the “pencil” barrel profile of the original Colt M16/M16A1 and also the same light-weight profile of the Colt 16” carbine barrel found on the Colt 6520 and 6720. However, this is not the profile of the Noveske N4 Light barrel.



Colt M16/M16A1 barrel . . .







Colt 6520 16” light-weight barrel . . .







The stripped-weight (no flash hider, no front sight base/gas block, just the barrel and barrel extension) of the Colt 16” light-weight barrel is 1 pound, 6 ounces. The stripped-weight of the Noveske 16” N4 Light barrel is 1 pound, 12 ounces; which is the same stripped-weight of the Colt 16” government profile barrel found on the ubiquitous Colt 6920.



Colt 6920 government profile barrel . . .







Noveske 16” N4 Light barrel . . .







As you can see in the pics above, for the N4 Light barrel, Noveske has done away with the next-to-useless M203 (grenade launcher) cut-out found on the Colt government profile barrel. The N4 profile also has a more evenly distributed barrel diameter (and thus weight) fore and aft of the gas block journal, which moves the center of gravity of the barrel farther aft compared to a government profile barrel. This all makes for a superbly handling 16” barrel.


The reason that Noveske uses the “Light” nomenclature for their N4 barrels is simply because the N4 barrels are lighter than Noveske’s original medium contour stainless steel barrels. For comparison, the Noveske 16” medium contour Recon barrel has a stripped-weight of 2 pounds, 2 ounces and as mentioned above, the 16” N4 Light barrel has a stripped-weight of 1 pound, 12 ounces.



The Noveske 16” Recon barrel . . .







The Noveske 16” N4 Light barrel is a cold hammer forged barrel. It has a mid-length gas system, “M4” feed-ramps and a chrome-lined chamber and bore. The barrel has a 5.56mm NATO chamber and a 1:7” twist and has been high-pressure/magnetic particle tested; as the barrel stamp indicates. Contrary to erroneous Internet reports, the N4 barrel does not have polygonal rifling.



The barrel stamp . . .








The mid-length gas system . . .







I conducted an accuracy (technically, precision) evaluation of the Noveske 16” N4 Light barrel following my usual protocol. This accuracy evaluation used statistically significant shot-group sizes and every single shot in a fired group was included in the measurements. There was absolutely no use of any group reduction techniques (e.g. fliers, target movement, Butterfly Shots).


The shooting set-up will be described in detail below. As many of the significant variables as was practicable were controlled for. Pictures of shot-groups are posted for documentation.


All shooting was conducted from a concrete bench-rest from a distance of 100 yards (confirmed with a laser rangefinder.) The Noveske 16” N4 Light barrel used in this evaluation was free-floated during testing using a Larue Tactical free-float railed handguard. The free-float handguard of the rifle rested in a Sinclair Windage Benchrest, while the stock of the rifle rested in a Protektor bunny-ear rear bag. Sighting was accomplished via a Leupold VARI-X III set at 25X magnification and adjusted to be parallax-free at 100 yards. A mirage shade was attached to the objective-bell of the scope. Wind conditions on the shooting range were continuously monitored using a Wind Probe. The set-up was very similar to that pictured below.

















For this evaluation, I used one of my standard match-grade hand-loads topped with Sierra 55 grain BlitzKings. When fired from my Krieger barreled AR-15s, this load has produced ½ MOA 10-shot groups at 100 yards.












Three, 10-shot groups were fired in a row from the Noveske 16” N4 Light barrel from a distance of 100 yards with the resulting extreme spreads:


1.29”

1.18”

1.31”


for a 10-shot group average extreme spread of 1.26”. The three, 10-shot groups were over-layed on each other using RSI Shooting Lab to form a 30-shot composite group. The mean radius of the 30-shot composite group was 0.37”.


After firing the above three groups, I fired an additional five,10-shot groups in a row for a total of eight, 10-shot groups fired in a row. The average extreme spread for all eight of the 10-shot groups was 1.24”. I over-layed all eight of the 10-shot groups on each other using RSI Shooting Lab to form an 80-shot composite group. The mean radius for the 80-shot composite group was 0.39”.






The smallest 10-shot group . . .

















The 80-shot composite group . . .








…..
 

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If your looking for a top quality barrel take a look at BCM. Not as expensive but you'll get the same results
I own a bcm upper, complete from bcm, still can't out shoot my 10 inch noveske. From an accuracy stand point of the rifles I personally own, accuracy going from worst to best:

Sig 556 10", AAC 9", radical firearms 8.5", m&p15 and bcm are about even, dsg 10", seekins 10", and noveske 10"
 

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Accuracy Evaluation of a Bravo Company 14.5” Barrel






The focus of this article is the cold hammer forged (BFH) version of Bravo Company’s 14.5” barrel with a mid-length gas system. As can be seen in the pic above, this barrel has a government profile. This is a chrome-lined, NATO chambered barrel with a 1:7” twist. Bravo Company states that these barrels have been high-pressure/magnetic particle tested according to the current mil-spec.

I conducted an accuracy (technically, precision) evaluation of the Bravo Company 14.5” BFH mid-length barrel following my usual protocol. This accuracy evaluation used statistically significant shot-group sizes and every single shot in a fired group was included in the measurements. There was absolutely no use of any Group Reduction Techniques (e.g. fliers, target movement, Butterfly Shots).

The shooting set-up will be described in detail below. As many of the significant variables as was practicable were controlled for. Pictures of shot-groups are posted for documentation.

All shooting was conducted from a concrete bench-rest from a distance of 100 yards (confirmed with a laser rangefinder.) The Bravo Company 14.5” barrel used in this evaluation was free-floated during testing using a Daniel Defense Omega free-float railed handguard. The free-float handguard of the rifle rested in a Sinclair Windage Benchrest, while the stock of the rifle rested in a Protektor bunny-ear rear bag. Sighting was accomplished via a Leupold VARI-X III set at 25X magnification and adjusted to be parallax-free at 100 yards. A mirage shade was attached to the objective-bell of the scope. Wind conditions on the shooting range were continuously monitored using a Wind Probe. The set-up was very similar to that pictured below.












For this evaluation, I used one of my standard match-grade hand-loads topped with Sierra 55 grain BlitzKings. When fired from my Krieger barreled AR-15s, this load has produced ½ MOA 10-shot groups at 100 yards.











Three, 10-shot groups were fired in a row from the Bravo Company 14.5” barrel from a distance of 100 yards with the resulting extreme spreads:

1.58”
1.96”
1.50”

for an average 10-shot group extreme spread of 1.68”. The three, 10-shot groups were over-layed on each other using RSI Shooting Lab to form a 30-shot composite group. The mean radius of the 30-shot composite group was 0.49”



The smallest 10-shot group . . .






The 30-shot composite group . . .





….
 

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The BCM 410 SS barrels are their barrels for best accuracy. Not a chrome lined barrel.
 

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From a pure mechanical accuracy standpoint its hard to argue with samples like the above. But you also might find a better load/bullet combo for that barrel as well...

But from a PRACTICAL shootability standpoint its irrelevant. A barrel that consistently groups .78 or 1.5 at 100 yards will do all that you ask of it unless you are shooting in a Benchrest Competition. Even in highpower you could shoot well into master class with a gun that shot 1.5" groups consistently out to 600 yards.

Very few people can hold their gun to 1.5 MOA under most any shooting conditions except off a bench. So hyper accurate guns may be interesting to discuss in theory but its like having 500 hp cars on the interstate. You can't (legally) drive it fast enough to enjoy the extra muscle anyhow... So from a practical standpoint its irrelevant.

Also, as I've said many times before...you need to shoot groups at 300 yards to get the real measure of a rifle's accuracy potential. You will see that bullets begin to settle down and fly differently at extended ranges and that's when you'll see the true accuracy potential of a barrel. Shoot 10 shot groups at 300 without letting the barrel cool down between shots and if you can keep them in a nice round baseball size group you know you have a really good barrel that can do some good work! Bullet dispesion is only very rarely linear in my experience meaning 1" groups at 100 don't usually translate to 3" groups at 300 etc.
 

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Granted I was shooting in some variable wind and shot 5 shot groups from a manual bolt drop to an open bolt, but these groups today illustrate that you really do need to shoot groups at distance. Of the 5 rifles I shot today, the Noveske printed to worst group of 1.8 MOA and my best groups were around 0.4MOA.
 
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