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Nitrate Process vs Tenifer Process

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by DannyR, Mar 16, 2012.

  1. DannyR

    DannyR Moderator Millennium Member

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    I understand that all Glocks now have the Nitrate Process on barrels, slides and metal sights instead of the old Tenifer, cyanide producing process. The Nitrate process is 99% effective against salt water exposure, far more effective than stainless steel and just as good as Tenifer.
     
  2. voyager4520

    voyager4520 -----

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    That's what I've heard as well. Do you know when they switched over to the Nitrate process?
     

  3. DannyR

    DannyR Moderator Millennium Member

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    I don't know, but Smyrna has been using the process all along.
     
  4. fireGLOCKfighter

    fireGLOCKfighter

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    Oh here we go.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2012
  5. fireGLOCKfighter

    fireGLOCKfighter

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    you are talking about Melonite, which is Tenifer, which is a nitrate process.

    Melonite=Tenifer

    edit: sorry double post.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2012
  6. patcrad

    patcrad Great White Box

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  7. Jim S.

    Jim S.

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    There is a difference as far as the Tennifer/ Nitrate process does not change the color of the base metal.
    Nitrocarburizing does make the metal black in color depending on the original hardness properties of the metal.
    They both harden the metal and that is the basis of the protection they offer.
    I know that you can remove the black color from a Glock slide and not really compromise the corrosion protection.
    I've never tried to remove the black color from a Melonite/ or the many different brand name finishes.
     
  8. fireGLOCKfighter

    fireGLOCKfighter

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    Now my understanding is the Tenifer is under the black coating... so taking off the black coating will still leave you with a Tenifer/Melonite shell.
     
  9. DannyR

    DannyR Moderator Millennium Member

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    A black phospoate coating was/is applied over both the Tenifer and the new Nitrate processed metal.
     
  10. fireGLOCKfighter

    fireGLOCKfighter

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    What is this "New" nitrate process you are talking about?

    They use Melonite at Smyrna, Tenifer in Europe.

    Melonite = Tenifer.

    Only difference is the name. It is a common misconception that Tenifer can't be done in America because of EPA regulations but in actuality it is because of licencing.
     
  11. glfpunk

    glfpunk

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    I will say that I don't know the intricacies of the finishing processes or the differences between them but in real world comparison, the new finish doesn't hold a candle to the old one. I have a gen 3 23 that I've had for years. It's been shot plenty and unholstered and reholstered countless times in both leather and kydex and to this day it looks brand new. I also have a gen 4 27 that I've had for a few weeks and it already has some holster wear on it.
     
  12. DannyR

    DannyR Moderator Millennium Member

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    The Nitrate process has replaced the Tenifer process in Austria. The Nitrate process does not produce cyanide as a byproduct, whereas Tenifer does. You will no longer see the word Tenifer in any Glock publications.

    I am not a chemist, and cannot explain the differences. I just report what I hear from official sources.
     
  13. fireGLOCKfighter

    fireGLOCKfighter

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    That is very incorrect and false.

    There own website says Tenifer.
    http://www.glock.com/english/index_pistols.htm

    And cyanide is not a "byproduct" it is the product to get the nitrate to the metal.

    Oh and rumors =/ "official sources"
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2012
  14. dpadams6

    dpadams6

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    Just had an armorer class last week. Instructor said all guns are nitrate now. NO TENNIFER
     
  15. Rodman24

    Rodman24

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  16. fireGLOCKfighter

    fireGLOCKfighter

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    Oh gosh, ok lets try this again...

    Tenifer and Melonite ARE Nitrate processes.

    The reason the "finish" looks different is because Glock changed the "finish" NOT the metal treatment.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2012
  17. fireGLOCKfighter

    fireGLOCKfighter

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    I know right? lol

    And for people to be like oh he said this or she said that... Instead of looking up facts amazes me, must be this day and age I guess. *sigh*

    They might have taken the idea from HEFUSA recently and made there "own" name for it. But it is still the same old Tenifer we know and love.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2012
  18. 8th ID

    8th ID

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    I really don't care what anyone calls it, as long as it works:cool:
     
  19. JohnnyC76

    JohnnyC76

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    Can someone tell me what my barrel is, please
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2012
  20. GRT45

    GRT45 Transform & Win

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    fireGLOCKfighter is exactly right about this.

    I'm comfortable with the quality of the Glock pistol if the Melonite process is applied to the slide and barrel because the Melonite process is the Tenifer process. These are just different registered trademark names for the one process licensed worldwide by Durferrit GmbH (part of the HEF Group since August, 2001). Keep this in mind for aftermarket barrels or slides you are considering from a North American manufacturer if the parts have undergone Melonite treatment.

    The current Tenifer/Melonite process is cyanide-free and a modern plant produces no effluent and meets EPA and OSHA regulations without difficulty.

    The process is technically categorized as molten salt bath ferritic nitrocarburizing (quite a mouthful).

    Everything you ever wanted to know about the modern Melonite/Tenifer process, but were afraid to ask, is found in the technical information document linked below. Don't waste your time with Google searches, reading Wikipedia articles, posts on Internet forums, etc. If you're interested in the facts about the trademarked Tenifer process, get the information from the original source (Durferrit GmbH).

    I read the entire document and it's very dry reading (my degree in Chemical Engineering helped), but the pertinent paragraph is the following at the bottom of page 15:
    "The TUFFTRIDE® process is known in English-speaking and Asian countries under that name, in Europe and German-speaking countries as TENIFER® and in the USA as MELONITE®. TUFFTRIDE®, QPQ®, TENIFER® and MELONITE® are registered trademarks of Durferrit GmbH."
    Technical Information Document:

    http://www.durferrit.com/media/pdf/Tenifer_QPQ_eng.pdf

    Summary of nitrocarburizing:

    http://www.durferrit.com/en/produkte/waermebehandlung/nitrocarbonitrieren.htm
    "The term nitrocarburizing means an enrichment of the surface layer of ferrous materials with nitrogen and a small amount of carbon. This thermochemical treatment improves the wear resistance and the fatigue strength."
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012