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Newbie Grip Technique Question

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by MississipVol, Jun 2, 2012.

  1. MississipVol

    MississipVol

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    I've had a Gen 4 Glock 19 for about 6 weeks now (my first handgun) and have put about 500 rds through it. I read up on both the "milking technique" and "thumbs forward" gripping techniques and went out to shoot 150 rounds to experiment with my grip.

    I made sure I was high on the gun and the best grip that felt like I was getting equal pressure all around included putting my index finger of my off (left) hand on the front of the trigger guard. I found, by doing this, I could put more of my left palm on the grip and get pressure there.

    My question is this: Is this a bad habit (to put your off hand index finger on the front of the trigger guard? Do I need to bring it down? Even though it led to tighter groupings, I do not want to continue using it if it is a poor technique or could lead to other problems. Thanks in advance!!!
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2012
  2. truetopath

    truetopath

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    Seems like an awkward way to hold the gun to me, but I've never done it that way so I wouldn't know how it feels. I really don't see any safety issues with gripping it that way, but I would probably try the usual grips and see if you can improve with more practice. Just my 2 cents.
     

  3. GRT45

    GRT45 Transform & Win

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    One potential issue comes to mind.

    If you train with the left index finger in front of the trigger guard, and later want (or need) to shoot the pistol with a weapon-mounted light/laser that butts up against the front of the trigger guard, it will force you to drop or extend the left index finger and shoot with an unfamiliar grip.
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2012
  4. BMyers

    BMyers

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    My friend was shoting with his finger in front of the trigger guard. I asked him why, he was told it would make him aim better. His shots had been all over the target and he could never get a good group, so I asked him to try shooting without his finger on the trigger guard and his groups came together. Still has work to do on getting his groups where he wants them, but now he is grouping and can focus on improving other issues (i.e. trigger pull).
     
  5. Blaster

    Blaster Hunc tu caveto

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    Keep it under the trigger guard!
     
  6. Jeff82

    Jeff82 NRA Benefactor CLM

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    Your off-hand grip will be tighter and more "secure" if you keep all your fingers together.
     
  7. Rancho_Nirvana

    Rancho_Nirvana X 1911 Addict

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    Keep your hands as integrated as possible.

    The feeling of more control extending the index finger out around the trigger guard is a common sensation for beginner shooters, but the grip is flawed for a multitude or reasons which would be too lengthy to address here, suffice it to say as your comfort level, and ability increase, and your training progresses the reasons will reveal themselves.

    Do what the best in the business recommend, keep weak side index finger under the guard, overlapping the opposing hand along with the others, all seated securely over the fingers of the primary control hand.

    I prefer thumbs facing forward, one above the other, dominant hand thumb resting on my 3rd Gen thumb rest, weak thumb wrapped just beneath it with thumb pad/palm pressed along the grip and thumbprint resting just on my weak side index second knuckle.

    But everyone's hands are a little different, so working within that framework find what works for you.

    Working with a good instructor is priceless, and I would highly recommend that at this juncture especially for you.

    30 years into this deal and I do the as regularly as time allows. ;-)

    Good luck, sounds like you are off to a great start!
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2012
  8. LuckyG

    LuckyG

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    Everybody has there own variations on grip technique. Generally, it is not good to position the finger on the trigger guard. Most people tend to destabilize the gun rather than stabilize it, since it can act as a pivot point. In our NRA courses, we discourage use of this technique for that reason. Occasionally, we will find a student who actually shoots well with this style. It is the exception, rather than the rule.

    My frame of reference here, is defensive shooting. This usually means, smaller full caliber guns, rapid shooting and multiple targets (assailants). Relaxed shooting on the range usually won't show a problem with a bad or mediocre technique. True defensive shooting drills will.

    Personally, I use the "thumbs forward" style with weak hand fingers fully wrapped. My weak hand thumb is positioned forward on the lower frame. It works very well with Glocks and fast, defensive shooting.
     
  9. Clusterfrack

    Clusterfrack

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    I agree with LuckyG on the finger.

    The support hand is primarily providing lateral squeezing force to the "vice" holding the grip, and an index finger on the trigger guard will reduce that force. However, the support hand can also act to support the rear of the gun: try making good contact between your support hand thumb base and the support side edge of the backstrap. Some people find that "flagging" the strong side thumb so it points up while keeping the support side thumb facing forward helps with this.
     
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2012
  10. MississipVol

    MississipVol

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    Thanks for the responses. Since I hadn't seen the index finger used in that way before, I figured it was not something I needed to do develop as a habit. Will try dropping it down again next time at the range. Thanks again.