Newbe Question – Case Prep

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by CarryTexas, Apr 27, 2012.

  1. CarryTexas

    CarryTexas

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    I am just starting out reloading and I am still working out all the details and purchasing equipment. However, I have a few questions.

    Initially I will be reloading .223. I have about 1500 once fired cases that I have been saving for about the last year. These are military spec brass with crimped primers.

    What is the most efficient way to remove the crimp from a large amount of brass?

    Without spending $300 on a Dillon power case trimmer. Is there a way to trim a lot of brass quickly and accurately?

    Thanks!
     
  2. ColoCG

    ColoCG

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    For removing pp crimp the Dillon Super Swage is a great tool. RCBS has a new pp swager similar to the Super Swage. There are also swager dies that remove the crimps, they are cheaper but much slower.

    As far as trimming your brass there are many power trimmers and power adapters that can be used with electric drills that do a quick job. I use a Forster trimmer with an adapter for a electric drill.

    You can also use an RCBS X- Die that prevents your brass from lengthening. The only problem if you use this is you still have to trim your brass initially befor it can work.

    Google power case trimmers, there are many available. Possum Hollow comes to mind.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2012

  3. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Nothing is easy about case prep. Even power trimmers take time to place & remove brass. Primer pockets are a bit easier, but still, all a PITA. I went w/ the Hornady case prep center. Yes it's pricey, but I can do all the seps right thre on one machine include reaming primer pockets. I am using the RCBS 'X' dies so I don't have to trim. So far it's working well, on my 5th reload, w/ a test batch, w/o trimming. I am losing some cases to shoulder splits. I can only assume hard mil spec brass.
     
  4. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    I have been reloading some Federal Champion brass. It's been a year or more so I don't remember if I initially trimmed the cases. However, I ran a bunch of fired cases from my previous reloading through the case gauge and they just don't need to be trimmed again.

    If you don't have one, get a case gauge:
    http://www.dillonprecision.com/#/content/p/9/pid/25547/catid/3/Dillon_Rifle_Case_Gages

    If you are shooting a semi-auto, you will want to full-length resize. Mine are being used in a bolt-action rifle so all I really need to do is size the neck. As it turns out, I'm just using an RCBS full-length die set on a Dillon 550.

    I haven't gotten around to using my Redding Competition die set.

    Richard
     
  5. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Neck sizing produces min stretch, but for guys running AR or M1A, you MUSt FL size & they will stretch w/ each firing.:crying:
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2012
  6. xXGearheadXx

    xXGearheadXx

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    I couldn't imagine doing 1500 cases with a reamer...30 or so cases like this is all it took for me to develop a hate (a burning hate) for that process. The super swage works great for the task...it is $100 bucks, but well worth it if you're going to do a lot.

    The Hornady case prep center, as was mentioned, looks like a winner for streamlining the rest of the necessary processes. I just got done doing 500 or so cases using an LE wilson trimmer (without the mic) on a stand, and hand tools for the other stuff. After sizing, trimming, chamfer, debur, cleaning primer pockets, deburing flash holes and brushing out the necks i probably have 8 or so hours invested in those cases. I'd like something a little quicker myself. As for accuracy, the LE wilson trimmer is great, it just takes a little while. Less if you get the power drill attachment for the cutter.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2012
  7. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    Hornady makes a primer pocket reamer that can be used in the Case Prep Center. The reamers don't come with the machine.

    Primer pocket cleaning bits do come with the machine. Apparently there is some kind of primer pocket uniformer bit available although I haven't pursued it.

    Richard
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2012
  8. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Little tip, the Lyman accessories that come with handles fit the Hornady case prep perfectly. I tend to pay the extra $20/K & get prepped primer pockets, beats using any tool to do it.:yawn:
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2012