Newb questions

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Chesafreak, Jul 9, 2020.

  1. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    In terms of a short burst with a full primer tube, shells in the feeder, bullets on the tray and a full powder measure, I can crank out 100 rounds in 5 minutes. Then I have to stop and pick up more primers. I really should buy one of the Dillon primer filler machines...

    As mentioned above, some people handle the rounds after loading to put them into neat boxes. I dump the output tray into a .30 cal ammo can. When the can is full, I grab another can. I have a lot of cans.
     
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  2. F106 Fan

    F106 Fan

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    In terms of the Lee Classic Turret, the Kempf Gun Shop variant is a better deal. Among other things, it doesn't include the Lee scale. This gives you an opportunity to buy a better scale that will last a lifetime. Dillon has a couple of nice scales.

    https://kempfgunshop.com/Kempf_Kit_w/_Lee_Classic_Turret_Press_-90064Kit-6575.html

    There are a bunch of YouTube videos dealing with this press. I haven't looked but I assume there an equal number for every press.

    BTW, I use a Redding T7 turret press for precision rifle. It's a nice press and would do a great job on pistol and .223. It would be horribly slow.

    I have always said that "Reloading isn't my hobby, shooting is my hobby!" I still feel that way. I want an unlimited amount of ammo but I don't want to spend very long making it.
     
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  3. Lil

    Lil

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    ...for two casual shooters, 125-250 rnds/visit, sound right? Prognosticate. X years from now, how many rnds? I'm not a volume shooter like many around here but have come to appreciate the efficiency of a Dillon 550. Progressive - yes. But not auto-indexing so can be used as a ss. Not only $ decision - consider bodily toll spent twiddling brass, standing and pulling...solo vs. fam time. Loading volume on a single stage is...not for me. I load for rifle on a Redding T-7.

    Good advice on buying volume components - the only way. Napkin math put me in the black after 3+ years. Start with one cartridge if necessary but do start.
     
  4. unclebob

    unclebob DFC, MSM, 12 Air Medals.

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    You can make the 650 or 750 non auto indexing if you want to do SS work. or you can put a case in one station and pull it out in the next station.
     
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  5. ChrisJn

    ChrisJn "Old Bill"

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    I have two Hornady LnLs, one for 9mm and one for .380 bolted firmly to my workbench, but still have my old Black and Decker folding Workmate which I brought with me from England 29 years ago to which is bolted my Lee LCT for .223. I would never part with it.
     
  6. Chesafreak

    Chesafreak

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    [QUOTE="1bigK, post: 29186328, member:] The 750 is an auto advance so there is less chance of a double charge, but nothing is idiot proof[/QUOTE]

    TBH I'm a little scare of reloading now. My best friend and I were having a beer and I mentioned reloading recently. He used to reload and shoot in competitions. He told me that his reloading press auto advanced and did multiple steps with each pull and somehow he got a high charge and his pistol blew up in his hand. He said his hand was hurt and a doctor had to pick shrapnel out of his eyes and that's when he quit reloading. He said he can't understand how he could have possibly overcharged one round.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2020
  7. sciolist

    sciolist On the Border

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    Intelligent people drive their cars into oncoming traffic and die all the time too. For something to be considered safe, it doesn't have to be completely impossible for there to be a bad outcome.

    In my situation, it's realistically impossible to load a round with enough powder to kB the gun. I would have to be trying pretty hard to do that. It is absolutely not going to happen by accident. I am much more likely to get in a wreck on the way to the range.
     
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  8. SARDG

    SARDG Florida's Left Coast

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    Was that a "hold my beer and watch me reload" moment?

    What you describe is an auto-indexing press, and it should be impossible to double-charge - without doing something terribly out of sequence, probably twice. You could nearly sit at the press as a zombie and still produce loads that won't KB. Was it possibly a squib load, followed by a live round? If one ran out of powder, didn't check the powder drop, and continued to load, you could get a no-powder charge that I suppose could get the bullet halfway down the barrel.

    Wasn't your friend wearing glasses when he shot his pistol?
     
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  9. George Kaplan

    George Kaplan emeritus

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    I'm new to the reloading game but you don't need to go further than the set up of an auto-indexing press to learn that you'd have to consciously stop and purposely remove and reinsert the case under the hopper to get a double charge.
     
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  10. 1bigK

    1bigK

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    For whatever reason, and there could be many, your friends gun KB’ed in his hand. I would be willing to bet that after his accident range personnel, or whoever, started to ask questions looking for a cause. The first or second question would be “Do you reload your own ammo?” Your friend would have answered “Yes”, and that was probably the end of their investigation because then they would automatically assume that he somehow double charged that round.

    Two things have happened right there. First off I would bet that they stopped looking for a cause for your friends accident and both made an assumption and also convinced your friend that is what happened. By them doing that they have just dodged (hopefully) any liability on their part by shifting all blame onto your friend. Especially if he went along with their narrative of how “They have seen this before, every time a gun blows up in a shooters’ hand, it was because he reloads.”

    Second thing is that they have scared you off from reloading as well. If the gun had one of several malfunctions it could have gone kablooie as well. One possible cause is a squib round, no powder and the primer drives the bullet into the barrel to lodge setting up the next round to over pressure and kablooie. And for the record, I have seen factory ammo squib.

    For your friend to double charge any round on an auto-advancing reloader takes a lot of effort and stupidity. But as they say if you try to make something idiot proof, then some idiot will come along and prove you wrong. Hell, you could get hit by some idiots bullet when you leave your house tomorrow morning, from them shooting their pistol up in the air 2 blocks over, and that could kill you. There are no guarantees in life, and even breathing the air could kill you eventually.

    The OP has to do whatever makes him comfortable, and I won’t try and twist his arm. But I think that he should do some more research and not be scared off so easily. I hope that your friend is okay. Is he still shooting?


    Sent from deep behind enemy lines in the liberal bastion of Denver, Co.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  11. Chesafreak

    Chesafreak

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    He said that he stepped out into his backyard to test fire a few rounds and didn’t put in glasses.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
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  12. unclebob

    unclebob DFC, MSM, 12 Air Medals.

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    What press was he using? Also how long ago did this happen. With the new Dillon Fail safe system unless you take the case out and put it back under station 2 you can not get a double charge. If you have the older Dillons using the springs and some other powder measures. You can start raising the handle a couple of inches then lower the handle again you can and will get a double charge.
     
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  13. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    That tells me he was likely experimenting with a load. The fact that he needed a test fire means he was changing things around to see what would happen.

    He either miscalculated on what he was developing, or possibly he was careless in the loading. Possible he was adjusting powder drop and taking a shell off the press to weigh the powder drop, and maybe dropped powder into some shell twice by mixing things up. Stopping the press normal routine to take something off of it and then putting some back on it really needs attention to detail. Dunno if that was the cause, but is a plausible event where a screw up is more likely.

    Test shooting without glasses seems to be careless. "I know, let's monkey with this load, then go test shoot it without eye protection." Hope he is ok, but I think that serves as an example of protective glasses being needed when test shooting.

    Reloading is potentially dangerous. Yes. The danger is also there with factory loads. One would hope the factory procedures are better than average reloader's procedures. But maybe the average reloader's procedure and ammo is better than factory.

    But what about the below average reloader? Whatever that means, and whoever they are. There are likely people reloading who you don't want to test their ammo :)

    If going into reloading, you get to decide who you want to be, what type of reloader you want to be. Are your loads better and more safe than factory? It is a responsibility (to yourself, and anyone who shoots your ammo). There is a lot to learn. Old time experienced loaders maybe forget how much they know, and under estimate how difficult it is for a newbie to learn enough to make good ammo and be safe.

    I think of reloading as a rewarding hobby. If you like shooting, you might like reloading. That is 2 hobbies.

    Others may disagree, but I don't think of reloading as some "no brain" thing you can do to save money on ammo. You can save money, yes, but you need to put your brain into it :)
     
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  14. George Kaplan

    George Kaplan emeritus

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    Old time experienced loaders maybe forget how much they know, and under estimate how difficult it is for a newbie to learn enough to make good ammo and be safe.
     
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  15. 1bigK

    1bigK

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    I want to second everything that Ithaca Deerslayer said. Reloading requires a level of focus and attention to details to be safe. I personally enjoy being able to focus on one thing only and avoid all of the distractions. Not everyone is so dedicated and willing to focus to the task at hand. Distractions like the cell phone, music, kids, and a hundred others can lead to a mistake that will be found later when shooting.

    If your friend neglected to put on safety glasses when he stepped outside to test that round, that also tells me that he was not wearing any eye protection while reloading either. That is a big safety no no. If he is/was being lackadaisical about such basic safety then I wonder what else he was being nonchalant about?

    Don’t let his haphazard practices and accident scare you away from pursuing a great hobby. Learn from his mistake and make the decision to be a better, more competent, and safer reloader. Get a good reloading manual and read up on this hobby. Pay attention to their safety warnings and heed them. And get out there and have fun.

    I almost forgot to suggest reading either the latest manual from Lyman, Speer, or other big name gun stuff supplier. Also I recommend “The ABC’s of Reloading” as a good thorough source for how to knowledge.


    Sent from deep behind enemy lines in the liberal bastion of Denver, Co.

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2020
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  16. fredj338

    fredj338

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    Yeah some people shouldn't reload, but those same people probably shouldn't own guns either. I am well over 400k rds in 44y of reloading. Never a KB, one squib & some case failures but those are just annoying. Just pay attention. Dont drink beer or reload with a buddy chatting in your ear. It is a simple task done with attention. Not much more difficult than slicing meat with a sharp knife.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2020