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Personally I'd like a Mark IV, S&W Victory and a TX .22- probably in that order. That Mark IV is a real modernized improvement on the Ruger line of .22 pistols. I think you should get one of those. Obviously the .22/45 is trying to feel like a Colt's 1911, but I really like the fit and feel of the old Ruger "drill handle" frame even better. That "Hunter" model is a really cool pistol. Dang it, now I'm gonna be thinking about that all night!
I scouted all over this "blessed country" looking for two years until I finally found the Ruger Mark III Hunter I was after:

Found this NIB Mark III up in Michigan at Williams Gun Sight Co. Great shooting pistol and not very many made. It's my favorite "walk-about" pistol in a leather DeSantis holster when I gad-about over our empire looking for "ANTIFA chipmunks".
 

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At least the Victory is a viable alternative...
The S&W SW22 Victory certainly is a viable alternative to the Ruger Mark series; it can often be found for less money and has a better "out of the box" factory trigger than any stock Ruger Mark pistol. The SW22 may not have the aftermarket following that the Mark series has but there are notable upgrades available for them particularly in regards to barrels, with the beauty of their design being that one doesn't need to involve a gunsmith to change one out or need to spend the $$ or time with an FFL dealer to perform a transfer...that new barrel will arrive at your doorstep, and all that's required to swap it out is an allen wrench.

I can attest to the very nice trigger on the SW22 as I own one, along with two Ruger Mark pistols, and it's noticeably better than the stock triggers on the Rugers. What has helped my Mark II was the installation of a Volquartsen kit, which made a noticeable improvement in trigger smoothness and reduced it's trigger pull weight, again, all without the requirement of a gunsmith.

Whether it's a .25 trigger job performed on a Glock pistol by it's owner or a Volquartsen kit installed in a Ruger Mark IV pistol by it's owner, it's nice to have these options available for people to perform in their gun room or shop...with most if nearly all who undertake these changes by themselves being ultimately quite satisfied with the results.
 

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Concerning what's being sold as accuracy kits, I've been doing some testing. First, I clamped a Ruger Mark IV Competition Target in this rest, with all factory parts installed as arrived:



I fired 50 rounds, five magazines full of CCI Standard, and recorded the accuracy.
Next, I installed what was sold to me as an "Accuracy Kit", and again set the Ruger Mark IV Competition Target pistol in my Ransom Rest and shot 50 of the very same lot of CCI Standard velocity ammunition. Accuracy was almost persactly the same as before the kit install. Here's the kit:



♣ #1 Ruger Mark II Light Hammer Get a bit faster "lock-time" Minimal aid for accuracy

♣ #2 Trigger adjustable for pre and over-travel. Adjustments just provide the trigger with minimal movement

♣ #3 Trigger Plunger and Spring. These parts lift the front end of the disconnector up and off the sear. This disconnector is the heaviest of all that I've weighed. The trigger plunger spring must lift this heavier disconnector from one end only, with all the weight involved forward of the spring and plunger.

♣ #4 Sear Spring. From all of my measurements, this spring is so close to being the same as the Ruger factory sear spring that I found very little difference to offer much improvement.

♣ #5 Target sear. If anything, this is the KEY component involved with this accuracy kit. It will reduce trigger pull to a very safe 2½ to 3 pounds, but I achieved no substantial improvement in what the kit was perceived to provide. Accuracy.

♣ #6 Disconnector. This is a steel, machined part. It's sole purpose is to connect the trigger to the sear for release and then re-set. It is heavier than the factory disconnector by almost 37%.

♣ #7 The hammer bushing. This part rides inside the hammer and the right end is captured in the disconnector window at the rear. As the trigger is pulled the bottom piece on the disconnector leaves the sear, and then the right end of the hammer bushing contains the disconnector from flying upward.

The two thin spacers are not meant to provide any accuracy improvement but only fill any voids between the bushing and contain side to side movement if needed.

So, not too many of these parts can, or will, provide much for accuracy improvement, or so I've found. What part does provide the most improvement, is the target sear. It would be terrific if we could only buy the sear, but that's not in the works at this point in time. What would be a considerable gain, is if the $150.00 + cost with shipping could get more palatable with a kit that ONLY helped with creating a much better, lighter and smoother trigger weight and pull could be acquired.
I know someone who is getting very close to achieving that end, and much more affordable.

BTW: One S&W S22 pistol does not a benchmark make. Ruger Mark pistols have a 70+ year history involving FINE performance, the S22 has what? A couple of years. I can't wait to get one in here and then run an accuracy comparison with the Mark IV vs. the fugly SW22.
 

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I know someone who is getting very close to achieving that end, and much more affordable.
You have us on the edge of our chairs.
 
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When tested in a Ranson Rest device every pistol will show it's inherent mechanical accuracy potential, whether it's got it's OEM trigger installed or one that's been worked to death by a gunsmith. But people aren't mechnical Ransom Rest devices, so it's up to the i.n.d.i.v.i.d.u.a.l to utilize whatever means they can afford themselves to allow them to be more accurate with a particular handgun, and the one means that's been proven the world over is for a person to provide themselves with a smoother and reduced trigger pull, and that's what an end user can afford themselves utilizing a Volquartsen Accurizing kit - and with no need whatsoever for a gunsmith.

There are literally thousands of completely satisfied customers who've installed these Volquartsen kits, and even though it's a relative newcomer to the scene, thousands more who've found the S&W SW22 Victory pistol to be a viable entry into the .22 semi auto pistol world. To argue these facts is just silly.
 

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What's silly is to argue that the expensive VQ kits are worth the investment for improving the accuracy of the Ruger Mk series pistolas by improving the trigger pull.

The kits have have been around in one form or another for over 15 years and contain many parts that do nothing to improve accuracy by making the stock trigger into a target trigger. VQ has a great reputation for producing quality parts and are savvy marketers of said parts.

It has be discussed ad nauseum on many different forms for years and most experienced shooters/tinkerers agree, the VQ sear will lighten the trigger pull significantly and the addition of the VQ trigger will help minimize pre and over travel. The aforementioned parts are all that is needed to aid the shooter's accuracy by way of trigger improvement. The remaining parts contained in the VQ kit are simply not needed.

Of course it's your money. Spend it on a kit if you wish or take the savings and buy more ammo.
 

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When tested in a Ranson Rest device every pistol will show it's inherent mechanical accuracy potential, whether it's got it's OEM trigger installed or one that's been worked to death by a gunsmith. But people aren't mechnical Ransom Rest devices, so it's up to the i.n.d.i.v.i.d.u.a.l to utilize whatever means they can afford themselves to allow them to be more accurate with a particular handgun, and the one means that's been proven the world over is for a person to provide themselves with a smoother and reduced trigger pull, and that's what an end user can afford themselves utilizing a Volquartsen Accurizing kit - and with no need whatsoever for a gunsmith.

There are literally thousands of completely satisfied customers who've installed these Volquartsen kits, and even though it's a relative newcomer to the scene, thousands more who've found the S&W SW22 Victory pistol to be a viable entry into the .22 semi auto pistol world. To argue these facts is just silly.

Well, you seem to certainly like being "silly", that's for sure. :crazy:
 

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I have a MKIV Tactical and S&W Victory.

The trigger on the Victory is noticeably better which allows me to shoot it more accurately. The Ruger’s trigger is very gritty and heavier so I’ll be upgrading it eventually.
 

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What's silly is to argue that the expensive VQ kits are worth the investment for improving the accuracy of the Ruger Mk series pistolas by improving the trigger pull.

The kits have have been around in one form or another for over 15 years and contain many parts that do nothing to improve accuracy by making the stock trigger into a target trigger. VQ has a great reputation for producing quality parts and are savvy marketers of said parts.

It has be discussed ad nauseum on many different forms for years and most experienced shooters/tinkerers agree, the VQ sear will lighten the trigger pull significantly and the addition of the VQ trigger will help minimize pre and over travel. The aforementioned parts are all that is needed to aid the shooter's accuracy by way of trigger improvement. The remaining parts contained in the VQ kit are simply not needed.

Of course it's your money. Spend it on a kit if you wish or take the savings and buy more ammo.
It's not silly when a marked improvement in a shooter's ability to be more accurate with a given firearm is observed after such a kit or parts are installed. Are the "other" parts included with these kits worth the extra money? A person might see a polished trigger spring plunger being of benefit, and maybe they think they'd like that extended bolt release over the original, or perhaps they have a use for that hammer bushing that's used to eliminate the magazine disconnect that they dislike so much in their Mark II or III. I'm sure that many folks find it a nice option to have all these parts and others available to them as a kit, and if not, noone's holding a gun against anyone's head to buy a kit - every part included in these kits can be purchased individually if so desired.
 

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I have a MKIV Tactical and S&W Victory.

The trigger on the Victory is noticeably better which allows me to shoot it more accurately. The Ruger’s trigger is very gritty and heavier so I’ll be upgrading it eventually.
That's a very nice looking Victory 'arn, thanks for sharing :)

Your experiences mirror mine in regards to the comparison between the Victory and Ruger MK factory triggers, and this is the reason why I decided to purchase Volquartsen trigger parts for my Ruger(s), and I'm very satisfied with the results. I guess this makes the both of us heathens? :eek:

LOL.
 

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It's not silly when a marked improvement in a shooter's ability to be more accurate with a given firearm is observed after such a kit or parts are installed. Are the "other" parts included with these kits worth the extra money? A person might see a polished trigger spring plunger being of benefit, and maybe they think they'd like that extended bolt release over the original, or perhaps they have a use for that hammer bushing that's used to eliminate the magazine disconnect that they dislike so much in their Mark II or III. I'm sure that many folks find it a nice option to have all these parts and others available to them as a kit, and if not, noone's holding a gun against anyone's head to buy a kit - every part included in these kits can be purchased individually if so desired.
The marked improvement in a shooter's consistent accuracy is from the installation of the sear and to a very small extent the trigger. Where you and I disagree is in the value of the other parts in the kit and their contribution to the improved trigger resulting in an increase in consistent accuracy.

As I've stated before, the other parts in the kit don't contribute any significant improvement in the trigger pull and resultant increase in consistent accuracy. If you want to believe otherwise, fine. Just don't expect me to agree with you. That's all have to say about that, Forrest.
 

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I have a MKIV Tactical and S&W Victory.

The trigger on the Victory is noticeably better which allows me to shoot it more accurately. The Ruger’s trigger is very gritty and heavier so I’ll be upgrading it eventually.
Just curious, what does a trigger pull gage read for each pistol? Gritty feel is a very simple malady to correct. Quite often, a smoother operating trigger pull can be deceiving as being lighter, especially if "newbie" owner, unlike yourself, is sorta fumble fingered and can't tell one from the other, anyway.
The Ruger Mark pistol wins the "BEAUTY" contest hands down and the upper removal only requires the method thoughtfully built right into the pistol. Don't need to carry a hex wrench around with you all the time.
And I see you put a very excellent barrel on the otherwise "fugly" , S&W, to replace the "hit or miss" for accuracy, factory barrel. Grip replacement [email protected]@KS much better also. Good move!
 

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Concerning what's being sold as accuracy kits, I've been doing some testing. First, I clamped a Ruger Mark IV Competition Target in this rest, with all factory parts installed as arrived:



I fired 50 rounds, five magazines full of CCI Standard, and recorded the accuracy.
Next, I installed what was sold to me as an "Accuracy Kit", and again set the Ruger Mark IV Competition Target pistol in my Ransom Rest and shot 50 of the very same lot of CCI Standard velocity ammunition. Accuracy was almost persactly the same as before the kit install. Here's the kit:



♣ #1 Ruger Mark II Light Hammer Get a bit faster "lock-time" Minimal aid for accuracy

♣ #2 Trigger adjustable for pre and over-travel. Adjustments just provide the trigger with minimal movement

♣ #3 Trigger Plunger and Spring. These parts lift the front end of the disconnector up and off the sear. This disconnector is the heaviest of all that I've weighed. The trigger plunger spring must lift this heavier disconnector from one end only, with all the weight involved forward of the spring and plunger.

♣ #4 Sear Spring. From all of my measurements, this spring is so close to being the same as the Ruger factory sear spring that I found very little difference to offer much improvement.

♣ #5 Target sear. If anything, this is the KEY component involved with this accuracy kit. It will reduce trigger pull to a very safe 2½ to 3 pounds, but I achieved no substantial improvement in what the kit was perceived to provide. Accuracy.

♣ #6 Disconnector. This is a steel, machined part. It's sole purpose is to connect the trigger to the sear for release and then re-set. It is heavier than the factory disconnector by almost 37%.

♣ #7 The hammer bushing. This part rides inside the hammer and the right end is captured in the disconnector window at the rear. As the trigger is pulled the bottom piece on the disconnector leaves the sear, and then the right end of the hammer bushing contains the disconnector from flying upward.

The two thin spacers are not meant to provide any accuracy improvement but only fill any voids between the bushing and contain side to side movement if needed.

So, not too many of these parts can, or will, provide much for accuracy improvement, or so I've found. What part does provide the most improvement, is the target sear. It would be terrific if we could only buy the sear, but that's not in the works at this point in time. What would be a considerable gain, is if the $150.00 + cost with shipping could get more palatable with a kit that ONLY helped with creating a much better, lighter and smoother trigger weight and pull could be acquired.
I know someone who is getting very close to achieving that end, and much more affordable.

BTW: One S&W S22 pistol does not a benchmark make. Ruger Mark pistols have a 70+ year history involving FINE performance, the S22 has what? A couple of years. I can't wait to get one in here and then run an accuracy comparison with the Mark IV vs. the fugly SW22.
This has to be the dumbest test I've ever seen. None of these parts make the gun more mechanically accurate. They make the gun easier to shoot accurately.
We all know you're a condescending *******, but now you're making us question if you know anything about shooting at all.
 

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...As I've stated before, the other parts in the kit don't contribute any significant improvement in the trigger pull and resultant increase in consistent accuracy. If you want to believe otherwise, fine. Just don't expect me to agree with you. That's all have to say about that, Forrest.
And as I clearly stated above, the "other" parts of these Volquartsen kits can provide benefits that may also be appealing to the buyer, and if not, they won't buy the kit but instead may order the individual parts that they require if they want to, e.g., order just a trigger and sear, etc.

I don't expect you to agree with me, but I do expect you to display some semblance of reading comprehension so I won't find it necessary to repeat myself. And I take it your "Forrest" remark directed towards me was an attempt at what exactly, being derogatory when all else fails? Such behaviour seems eerily familiar... :whistling:
 

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I think that Mk IV is really neat, but I purchased a MkIII .22/.45 a few years back. Took it to club and shot it yesterday. Sorry, but thing is terrible. Jammed about 3 out of 50 hollowpoints (36g Minimags.)
I'd stay away from the 22/45. Magazines are weird (and don't eject or drop) and the old Ruger drill-handle type frame is far more ergonomic.
I got a Ruger .22/45 mk III with 4 magazines I for sale....
 

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I thought the OP just wanted info on Ruger pistols,not what everyone has done to theirs. There are volumes on custom work on Ruger. I thought the question was should I buy one.
 
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