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New Hunter

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by Onion11, Aug 16, 2004.

  1. Onion11

    Onion11 Pluck Off!

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    I've never really been hunting before, and have really taken an interest in it. I will be pheasant hunting for the first time this season w/ my buddy. I'm sure it will be fun, but I am looking into deer hunting. I don't have a rifle yet (have a 12 ga. for the pheasants), and I'll give myself till next season so I have time to buy one, some equipment, and join a shooting club to meet others who can help me out, maybe have me tag along. I was wondering if you guys could put together a list for me of the items I'll need, including opinions on caliber/ scopes etc.. Also, I'm sure with every successful hunt there are costs associated with processing the meat, and maybe a trophy down the line :). I know it all depends on the size of the animal, but if someone could throw a ballpark figure my way that would be cool. Sorry for the novel here, but I'm starting from scratch..
     
  2. noway

    noway

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    welcome aboard and the only suggestions I can tell ya;
    read the web, every hunting magazines, ask experience hunters in your area for general advice, info, cost, licensing,etc......

    if you have a outfitters in your area, I would highly reccommend go thru one of them. You guide will be able to answer all of your questions, give you advice and you will learn a hell of alot in one guide hunt and be less frustrated vrs jumping in feet first.

    Nobody can give you pricing since, it all depends on you locale and what you are doing. Outside of hardware ( clothes/gun/ammo/license/etc... ) you other cost that you should account for and that can vary big time.

    as aar as a rifle, don't think you "always" need one. I currently find no need for hunting with a rifle in my current locale. To be quite fair most of the area I hunt now don't even allow a rifle and the previous state I lived in shamed the rifles for deer hunting.

    good luck
     

  3. TexAg

    TexAg

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    A rifle in .243 to .30-06 or .308 would do you fine for white tail and the larger .30 calibers could handle larger game as well. I'd recommend a scope, but of low power so that you can aquire your target quickly; a 3 to 7 or 9X variable would be good. A box of ammo to sight your gun in (should do it in about 3 shots) and the rest to hunt with. Binoculars so you can scout locations and look over alot of ground, looking for deer and movement without having to waive your gun everywhere. Good outdodor hunting clothing, waterproof preferably and quiet when you move as well. Good waterproof boots of course. Gloves.
    Processing in TX costs about $60 to $90 depending on size of deer and what kind of cuts and sausage if you want it.

    And go with someone your first time or two. Good luck.
     
  4. Onion11

    Onion11 Pluck Off!

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    Thanks a lot guys. I've been reading a bunch in my spare time..I have a lot more to do though..thank God for the Internet. I'll do some checking around for nearby guides to to take me out. I'll probably pick the stuff up here and there as I go along. any suggestions on some rugged binoculars (not a ton of $$)??
     
  5. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    If it's me going deer hunting with a rifle,

    I like a bolt action .30-06 (but suggest .308 for others, too), 3x9 scope, set it at 3. Remmy 700 is nice, but Savage is fine, too. $300 to $600 depending upon what you get and your glass.

    Boots must be water proof. Rubber with insulation for $50. Or fancy leather and goretex for $100.

    Gore-tex hat with earflaps. Goretex gloves, insulated (I only wear one when I'm expecting to shoot). $50.

    Binocs can be cheap compact 10x21. $30.

    Processing might be $60.

    License is about $60 for all game.

    You could get a nice warm hunting coat for $100, but would be $200 if water proof Gore-tex.

    Total (using the lower numbers) = $650.

    Don't forget the knife, rope, and compass.
     
  6. muddydog

    muddydog

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    my list of must haves.
    you must also learn how to use them before actually going on the hunt.


    1- compass
    2- quality knife (gerber or buck..folder, prefer 1/2 serrated)
    3- some rope (25ft nylon)
    4- quality canteen set with a inexpensive filter set.
    5- GOOD SOCKS!!!
    6- decent backpack/napsack..i have 3 or 4 around here, depending on what i hunting for.
    7- GOOD BOOTS!!! you cna get nice boots now for $75 or less spend the money on the gortex if you can.
    8- a couple fo types of hats. 1 gortex/thinsulate skull cap. 2 a nice boonie or any other type of cap you like.
    9- good insulated underware.
    10- outer clothing..walls..is very durable clothing. cheapest too.

    firearms-
    deer--under 100 yards..a good 30-30 or a bolt gun in 308/3006/270.
    your pick. i kill deer with whatever i feel like carrying that day.

    scopes..if you think you want one...not necessary..but a must have for soome folks.
    spend more than $100 on your scope..normal hunting you cna get by with a 2x7 or 3x9..or even a straight 4x. the bushnell 3200 series are excellent for the price. some simmons are too, leupolds as well. stay away from the new cheapr leupolds..

    use good ammo...not skimp.

    contrary to what some salesman will try to tell you..
    you dont need a 7 ultramag for deer..

    if you need to go on a budget..you can do it for less than $400.
    used 30-30..cheap!!! adn use the rest of the money for clothing.

    shooting is the simplest part of deer hunting. being comfortable enough to hunt in peace and be still..is the hard part.

    talk to the area biologist and game warden for the state ...for help.
    also..
    TAKE THE STATE HUNTERS SAFETY CLASS!!!!!!!
    wear your orange...please..


    deer are relatively easy to hunt..they are creatures of extreme habit.
    you can easily manipulate them to hunt them with the use of small food plots and mineral licks..

    they concentrate in natural feeding areas and have a very social breeding pattern..

    if you want to become a good deer hunter..i really encourage you to get a .22 rifle and start squirrel hunting..in your area.
     
  7. nyredneck

    nyredneck كا&

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    Probably some of the best advice you'll hear! If you can stalk and shoot bushytails you can stalk and hunt deer, the hunting is alomost identical!! notice I said "almost identical" not too many deer climb trees!! Good luck and be safe!!

    ---NYRedneck
     
  8. Onion11

    Onion11 Pluck Off!

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    You guys are great! My dad's got a .22 semi that I take out once in a while. I'll need to find a place to chase some bushytails. I'm not too far from rural areas, but (and forgive me if this is a stupid question) can you just go out and hunt down squirrels?? I think they'd be ultra fun to stalk and hunt, but I don't know what I'd do with 'em once they're dead??? Also, in regard to the Blaze orange..how much should you wear??
     
  9. muddydog

    muddydog

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    first thing you should do is become intimate with your states hunting regulations.

    i mean...INTIMATE...a hunters safety class will cover these as well.

    every state has different rulz and regs.
    different zones and areas as well.

    squirrels will have a designated season as well as rabbits.
    requirements for safety colors vary too.

    my brother and i started hunting squirrels when we were so small we had to ride in a backpack with leg holes cut out.

    hunting squirrels requires you to be a rifleman as well as a hunter.
    not only will you learn how to move around in the woods..but also how to read sign.

    you'll be amazed at how much deer sign you'll find and learn about deer movements in the area too.

    PS..
    stewed squirrel...and fried apples...with biscuits and gravy..
    MMMMMMMmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

    young squirrel..not big boars.

    PSS...
    how do you know when its a boar squirrel..

    *
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    *
    *
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    if you listen close...you can hear his nutz rattle.

    i dunno..but my father told me that when i was out one day..when i was about 5 or 6 and i still laugh at that on...

    29 years later
     
  10. ithaca_deerslayer

    ithaca_deerslayer

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    License most likely is needed.

    Great idea to hunt squirrels. Good practise for deer hunting, and fun in its own right.

    Use a .22, sit still and wait for them to come near on the ground. While you are sitting there, you may also see deer and other wildlife. How long can you sit comfortably? 4 hours for me. You can start by trying 30 minutes in one spot without moving. Work your way up to 1 hour, and maybe someday 2 hours.

    Target shoot that .22 on the range before hand. Know the distance that you can hit an apple off-hand, that will be your limit for the squirrels. For deer, the distance will be where you can hit a large grapefruit, off-hand.

    Shoot the squirrel in the head. Take home, gut, skin, cut the head and feet and tail off, clean good, and cook and eat.
     
  11. S2CPitts

    S2CPitts

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    Everything you need for Nebraska's Hunting is here...
    Nebraska Hunting And in case you are on the Council Bluffs side of the river... Iowa Hunting

    What kind of shotgun do you have? If it is a Remmington 870, you could buy a rifled barrel for it if you really wanted to keep a tight budget...
    Chris
     
  12. Dogbite

    Dogbite DNT TREAD ON ME

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    There has been alot of great advice given.I would also add a few things to the deer hunting.These may seem like a given,but some people just can not be still in a deer stand.You have to be very still, and very quite.If you stalk hunt,walk very very slowly,and stop often for a minute or two and look up ahead,look for a tail moving,or an ear--part of a deer in between the trees and bushes.If you end up shooting a deer,just wait,do not run after him.Give him some time to die.Sometimes people run after them,they will keep running and running,and you might loose the deer.I hope these things help a little bit.Be safe!! I hope you kill a monster!!
     
  13. Hunterjbb

    Hunterjbb

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    Man things you need..take a hunter safety course, or two.

    As said before nothing can beat keeping your feet dry. Good gortex boots that are not heavy and are comfortable. Rocky makes great boots. spend the money, you get what you pay for.

    clothing, layer man think layers,how you dress depends on the type of hunt your going to do, Still hunting vs. Stand hunting, vs. hunting with dogs or driving deer.. A good waterproff jacket will be a life saver on those really crappy days. Layers allows you to shed or add as needed. gloves you should layer also,Check Walmart for gloves..and even clothing.

    Day pack or fanny pack. Most people either take to much or not enough. In this day pack you should have some basic survival stuff, space blanket, small first aid kit, fire starter, possibly a poncho(which makes a great shelter half if needed) waterproof matches or something to light the fire. Maybe a protein bar or two, heck maybe an MRE if your going back deep in the woods. Small flashlight, extra batteries. Compass(Learn how to use them)Handheld GPS if your going in unfamiliart spots. Small Radio, you can buy them in pairs these days. A map of the area your are hunting.

    WATER or beverages, NO alcohol...If you take hot water you can make tea, soup etc with small packets. If you stay out all day.

    Knifes are kind of a personal thing, i carry two. Go look at the Swiss army pocket knives, The Trailmaster, Hunter, One hand treker all good knives. Or something similar to those, also you may want to carry a larger Fixed Blade, cold Steel SRK, Small Kbar.. Something in those lines, don't really need it but you never know when you might need something bigger, can put it in the pack.

    Rope. go to the store and buy one of those 50ft. 1/4 poly ropes. Work great, and some parachute cord.

    Optics. Here is where you can drop some cash. You get what you pay for, although recently the quality of the cheaper stuff is much better then a few years ago. Leopuld makes great scopes. Simmons are good(cheaper).. depending on your hunting area, 2.5 x 8 is good or 4.5 x 14.. Get a 50mm objective though if you can or as close as you can better light transmission.

    Rifle, .270 or 30.06. Remington still makes one of the best rifles all around, check out there new line the 710.. Also Savage make a good rifle, some folks just suggested to me the Tikka T3. A good Sling is important get one of the Neopreme ones, most comfortable i've ever used.

    let's see, what have i forgot.. oh yeah.. Ammo.. get plenty and Practice with your Rifle, shotgun whatever.. just practice. Take a pie plate and put it at 50 yds. Put 10 rounds standing into it, don't move out any further till you can. Put the next plate at 75yds. same drill. then go to 100.. try for 5 at both 75 and 100.

    Ask you bud's about sighting in, I would go for Zero at either 150 or 200 yds.. that way your good for a long way off.

    I would suggest for deer size game, the 130gr pointed softpoint in .270 or the 150gr pointed soft point in 06.. dont' really need anything bigger.. Federal & Winchester make good rounds so does Hornady.. I personally don't Like remington but lots of folks do.

    One other thing you may consdier, a small stool and a Foam seat to sit on. I don't know if your going to be using stands and tree stands are a whole different game..

    Ok.. and did i mention PRACTICE..

    And the number ONE THING.. .THINK BEFORE YOU SHOOT !.. is it safe, what am i shooting at? Make sure of what you are shooting at, DO NOT SHOOT AT NOISE.. What's behind what i'm shooting AT ?. Where are the other hunters i'm with ? IF YOUR NOT SURE OF ANY OF THESE DON"T SHOOT !..

    If you do shoot and the deer does not drop make sure you Mark the spot with something after you go look for it. Tip, once you shoot unless the deer goes down right there, watch where it runs and mark the spot where you "think" you hit it, use a hat,scarf, whatever.. Make circles around that spot looking for blood if it's not really evident. Wait about 15-30 min's before going after the deer.

    Trophies and processing, any way you look at it you should clean your deer right away..cool it down. Processing will run from 50-100 depending on what you have made, least for me it did.. Trophies.. hmm cross that bridge when you come to it, can get expensive.

    Other then that, good luck and be SAFE..

    Jeff.
     
  14. Onion11

    Onion11 Pluck Off!

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    My shotgun is an older mossberg 500. I would consider hunting deer with it, but would really like to go with a rifle..personal thing I guess. Would rifled slugs do if I do choose this method, or is there a huge difference when using a rifled barrel?? Thanks for the website s2c, I stumbled on it a couple days ago, and found information on the hunters classes, and will soon be enrolling (gotta weird work schedule to work around right now). After looking at the savage, tikka, and others, I think I'm gonna be looking for a Remington. Another question that came up would be what type of stock/finish combo to use. I like the idea of a synthetic, with a blued barrel. There are many in stainless, would this be recommended?? I already have a gerber 3.5" folder with partial serration, and will most likely be investing in a fixed blade as well. Thanks to all for taking time to provide this info, as I will be using this as a reference when picking up gear as the funds roll in.
     
  15. noway

    noway

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    {Would rifled slugs do if I do choose this method, or is there a huge difference when using a rifled barrel?? }

    Yeap, just test them on the range and know your limitations with gun setup. You will find unless you have a "rifled-sight" or scope you will be limited in distance that you can hit accurate at. Most SG with a rifle scope and a 20"-26" bbl can easily place any of the std Federal/Remington/Winchester rifle 1oz slugs COM on a target sheet at distance up to 100yrds with practice.
     
  16. Hunterjbb

    Hunterjbb

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    500.. great dang shotgun. I would say the biggest difference with the rifled barrel is accuracy, although if you find the right slug for your SG you should be ok. just know your not gonna be shooting 200 yds, unless your pretty darn good.

    Remingtons are good, stock choice..I personally like a nice wood stock, but now a days its seems the composites are more popular. Heck they are darn near indestructible, don't warp or swell or shrink, hence helping with accuracy.. The 710 line only comes in composite i think ?. Oh and they don't scratch like wood does either, well not as easily anyway.

    Either way your ok unless you plan on hunting in the rain alot, then i'd recomend a composite. Get the one that feels the best when you bring it up to your shoulder. You should also think about trying the "fit" of your new weapon with your hunting clothes on ;) those extra layers sometime can make a difference.

    good luck.
    Jeff.
     
  17. Sixgun_Symphony

    Sixgun_Symphony NRA4EVR

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  18. Onion11

    Onion11 Pluck Off!

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    Holy cow that looks nice! I'm sure she's a bit more than I can afford right now though.. Someday though!