Glock Forum - GlockTalk banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone. Last night was my first attempt ever at reloading. I have some 230 gr JHP projectiles made by Campro. They have flat sides then a cone. It seems because of that I need to seat it very deep for it to plunk unto the barrel of my Remington R1 and G21. The practice cartridges I made had an OAL of 1.17" This seems very short to me. I have done a lot of searching and have not found any one else with 230 gr projectiles seating this short. My pistols will feed WWB (measured at 1.26") no problem at all so I am assuming its because of the cone shape of the projectile.

I plan to use CFE pistol. Hodgdon lists a starting load at 5.4 gr with an OAL 1.20. The projectile manufacturer suggested to try 6.0 gr with an OAL of 1.18. I am planning to try 5.4gr at 1.17 OAL.

I wanted to post here to see if any of you experienced reloaders think this is an unsafe plan of action. I imagine 5.4 gr is pretty conservative even at my short OAL, but it seems like everyone else OAL is significantly longer. Is there something I am doing wrong?

Also, I took an assembled round, no primer or powder, put it in a mag and chambered it by releasing the slide to see if it would feed at that length. It fed, but when I took it out and measured it again it seemed the chambering caused the projectile to get pushed back very slightly, like 0.02". Is this a sign of too weak a crimp?

Thanks for any advice. I'm kinda regretting not getting ball instead of JHP
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,642 Posts
I would go with the data from the bullet manufacturer and work up the powder load. I have had some round nose flat point bullets that required a very short OAL as the longer ones would hang up on the ramp or push into the lands. They had plenty of room in the magazine. The ogive wasn't as angeled as a RN but it was enough so it would fit the magazine. It did not do well on the ramp and if it did load it was in the lands and would not go into battery. Once I dropped the magazine to clear it the bullet stayed in the barrel and the casing ejected with powder being thrown everywhere. A little bump with a cleaning rod got the bullet out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,555 Posts
There you go, you have your answer in the excellent post by Turn4811.
s45
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for that. The picture is pretty much exactly the issue I was having. I went to the range today to test em out. They fed and functioned no problem, but accuracy was not too good and ejection seemed quite weak. The empty cases were landing about 3 feet away. I was comparing them to some PMC and Barnaul rounds. They were more accurate and cases landed maybe 5-8 feet away. Im thinking the charge was too weak. gonna load some more and see how that goes.

Thanks again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,798 Posts
Sounds like you figured out that with that bullet design coupled with the chambers of your guns you need a short OAL. Good job. You've also seen that it is a pretty weak load (but strong enough to function). Now the fun begins; finding a load that meets your accuracy standard. Start bumping up your powder charge in 0.2 gr increments (I would load 10-15 at each charge weight) and find the load that meets your objective. Be careful as you approach max, looking for any signs of high pressure (or better yet, monitor your loads using a chronograph).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,714 Posts
Oal is always bullet & gun specific, regardless of what any data tells you. It must fit your gun. So make a dummy round, load it as long as possible & still have it fit your gun. That is your oal. Then work up the powder charge. Look at 0.010" on your calipers, its not a lot, a thick sheet of paper. It willhave little affect on pressures, especially at midrange loads & below.
 

·
NRA Life Member
Joined
·
29,065 Posts
Don't load too long that it doesn't fit the magazine. Ask me how I know. :supergrin:

wp
 

·
Wood butcher
Joined
·
2,383 Posts
There are some good answers here so I debated posting. I agree with Fred about gun specific OALs. However, my method is a little different, but I use it for rifle and never have done it with handgun, but it would be the same.

Place the desired bullet alone into the chamber and hold it there using something. Put a dowel in the front of the bbl until it hits the front of the bullet and mark that spot at the bbl with a fine pencil line. Knock the bullet out, put the bbl back in the gun and repeat the process with the dowel now touching the breech face, and mark the point at the bbl again.

The distance between the two marks is the oal to the lands - back off an amount you are comfortable with. That should alleviate potential pressure problems and enables the bullet to release with very little space before engaging the lands. YMMV.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top