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Network security class???

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by lomfs24, Sep 29, 2004.

  1. lomfs24

    lomfs24

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    I have, unexpectedly, been asked to speak at a class for network security that will cover wired, wireless security as well as internet security for dial-up and high-speed users.

    I don't have a lot of time to prepare this class. So I am looking for suggested topics. I can prepare the topics I am just looking to cover my bases.

    I will have about 1 hour. Some of it will be lecture and some of it will be Q&A.

    Target audience will be retired to semi-retired users who's children have bought them a computer or they have bought a computer and they are trying to learn how to use it.

    What highlights would you cover? I plan on covering wireless security as far as WEP, controled DHCP, limited number computers. I plan on covering AV programs both freeware and non-freeware. I plan on covering spy-ware etc...

    I am a little lost on dial-up security. I have never had the need to do that. What is avaiable. Does Windows built-in firewall cover dial-up connections? And does ZoneAlarm cover dial-up? Is Zone Alarm free or pay?

    Anything else I should cover? When you first got a computer what do you wish someone had told you?
     
  2. physicsdevil

    physicsdevil

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    Given your target audience, I wouldn't discuss anything that doesn't affect them directly. The vast majority of them will likely be Windows users, and -- assuming that they are in-fact "trying to learn how to use" a computer -- running wired networks.

    Suggested topic list:
    - Patching: Cover Windows-update and how to configure it (automatic download and manual installation) for various versions of Windows.
    - Anti-virus: You could discuss potential attack vectors (i.e. this is how the bad guys get to you; don't open attachments from people you don't know, blaa, blaa, blaa) and consequences. Since these aren't "tech" people, I'd pick a good package ::cough:: AVG ::cough:: and teach them how to configure it.
    - Spyware: It's important that people know the difference between a virus and spyware. Teach them Spybot S&D or AdAware.
    - Firewalls: Not everybody will have XP, so I'd gloss over how to turn the XP firewall on and concentrate on a particular firewall package. ZoneAlarm offers a free version and is one of the better packages. Other free firewalls are 'Sygate Personal Firewall' (my fave) and 'Kerio Personal Firewall'.
    - Spam: You could go over basic spammer tactics (why spammers want to hack grandma's PC, 419 and other phishing scams) and how to configure an anti-spam app (Spamihilator is free and does a decent job without being overly complex).

    As far as WiFi goes: if you feel that it's relevant, cover how to set up WEP/WPA and how to change the key -- arguably single most important factor in WiFi security. I don't see a need to confuse them with stuff like DHCP limiting, MAC filtering, stealthing the SSID, etc. unless there are a lot of WiFi users in the class.

    There's really nothing to discuss with respect to dial-up security, unless they're running dial-up servers on their boxes (if they are, it's probably too late) ;) ZoneAlarm -- or just about any firewall for that matter -- will see a dial-up connection just like any other Internet connection, and will filter accordingly.
     

  3. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    To add to physicsdevil's excellent suggestions, I would make sure that I explained the concepts of firewalling. Then it will be easier for them to pick a package once they understand what all the features mean. It will also make them more effective in protecting their home nets.

    I would also look at what the most popular firewall/dhcp router is these days for DSL home broadband networks and mention a few of the critical features and explain why they're important.
     
  4. lomfs24

    lomfs24

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    Thanks phusicsdevil. those were just the things that I were looking for. I am not a speaker by trade and this whole thing kinda caught me off guard. There is a large difference between walking on scene and going to work and telling someone how I do what I do.

    Thanks hwyhobo for the suggestion about looking at the firweall/DHCP router. Actually the local LUG tonight is on hacking a new Linksys B/G router. I am not sure exactly what he has planned but I am sure I will know it inside and out by the time we are done.
     
  5. grantglock

    grantglock /dev/null

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    retired or semi retired? You are first going to have to explain what a firewall is to them. I'll bet quite a few have no idea how to check email. I would prepare a speech as though you were going to speak to 5 year olds. I work for an ISP and occationally I have to talk to some older folks who had computers given to them. First, they didn't want the thing in the first place but thier kids want them to get email; second, if it its not related to email they don't want it. Local computer shops are there for this reason. Many do house calls, at least around here they do.
     
  6. David_G17

    David_G17 /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

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    1.) yes
    2.) yes
    3.) there's a free version and a pay version.
     
  7. physicsdevil

    physicsdevil

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    But the difference between your experience and this case is that this is a class of older people. The implication being that they at least have an interest in learning what to do, and aren't merely looking for technical support.