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Need Info About Glock Talk

Discussion in 'Announcements & Support' started by TruV6, Jun 4, 2007.

  1. TruV6

    TruV6

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    Hey all, I was just wondering if you guys could give me some info on the abreviations that you guys use. like FPF i think or FPE...something along those lines...also topics like KABOOM...i have no idea how that happens...something w/ reloads or something...i'm trying to gain as much knowledge about glocks w/out bothering you guys, but its kinda hard with some of the abreviations...thanks for any help guys!
    -Martin
     
  2. ecmills

    ecmills I shoot guns.

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    FTF: Failure to fire, or failure to feed. Two different failure, same abbreviation. Can be confusing.

    FTE: Failure to extract, or failure to eject. Again, two different failure, one abbreviation. Confusing.

    Double-feed:
    Usually results from a failure-to-extract. The empty case remains in the gun, the slide cycles, and tries to feed a second round into the already-occupied chamber.

    KB: Kaboom. The gun blows up in your hand. Usually the result of a double-charge (a cartridge with twice as much powder as it should have had) from reloaded ammunition. Or brass that's been used too many times, or something completely unheard of. It happens.

    Limpwristing:
    You don't have enough tension in your wrists. Many people concentrate on gripping the gun tightly between their hands/fingers, when a proper tension in your wrists and forearms is far more important. Loose grip/wrists allow the gun to move too freely.
    Ideally, the gun's frame moves very little when held correctly. When the shot fires, most of the recoil is soaked up by the recoil spring and the movement of the slide: The frame is held fairly still, and the slide cycles rapidly above it.
    A limp grip allows the entire gun to move instead, slowing down the cycling of the slide relative to the frame. This can frequently induce malfunctions in autoloaders.


    Milking:
    Hold your hand out in front of you with your trigger finger straight, and the rest of your fingers wrapped around an imaginary pistol's grip. Squeeze the trigger with that straight finger.
    See how the rest of your 'grip' fingers move with it? THAT is "milking" the gun, and it's the biggest reason novices shoot guns (especially Glocks) poorly. A righty will put his holes to the left of the bullseye, and lefty will miss to the right.
     

  3. douglasd

    douglasd CLM

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    I think you mean "FTE" and "FTF" which are "failure to extract" (or eject), and "failure to feed" (or fire). When the empty shell doesn't eject completely from the gun, or a new round doesn't seat properly into the chamber.

    Many times it happens to newer shooters due to what is known as "limpwristing", which is basically just not holding the gun tight enough so the slide doesn't work as efficiently as it should. It CAN be due to ammo, the magazine, or the gun itself, but it usually is the shooter that causes it.

    Failure to fire is when the primer does not ignite the main powder charge, usually caused by defective ammo or a light primer strike.

    A Kaboom is when the gun blows up, usually because of something someone did wrong...usually with reloads. There is an internet myth that GLOCKs, especially .40 cal, do it more than most guns. If they do, it's only because there are far more of them in use than any other gun.

    I am growing weary of this nonsense. A GLOCK is one of the safest and most reliable guns there are...provided of course, the shooter is not an idiot.
     
  4. troy96

    troy96

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  5. TruV6

    TruV6

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    Thanks for all of the info guys...also i couldn't get quite clearly what the reloads mean...does that mean that people are using their own home-made ammo or something? or using the same shells twice if thats even possible?
     
  6. Kevin108

    Kevin108 THIS IS IN ALL CAPS

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    When you shoot a round 3 things happen.

    1. The primer fires
    2. This ignites the powder, which burns rapidly
    3. This forces the bullet out of the case

    You are then left with a case that is empty except for a spent primer. To reload, various machines can be used but they all accomplish about the same thing.

    1. The case is resized to original specs.
    2. The spent primer is removed and replaced with a new primer.
    3. Powder is placed inside the case.
    4. A new bullet is seated in the end of the case.

    A KB or a kaboom is often caused when a damaged case is reloaded and fails or if too much powder is placed in the case.
     
  7. yunone

    yunone

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    thats a good list but i dont see POA listed and i see it on this board sometimes

    POI=point of impact

    does POA mean= point of AIM ?


    thanks in advance
     
  8. DJ Niner

    DJ Niner Moderator

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    Yes.


    And welcome to GT!
     
  9. G19cPH

    G19cPH

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    Welcome to GT!:wavey:
     
  10. douglasd

    douglasd CLM

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    Yes, some people save their empty shell casings and reuse them, especially for the more expensive (usually larger) calibers.

    You put in a new primer, new powder, and a new bullet, using any of a number of available machines, and you save on the cost of your ammo.

    I would only ever do it for practice ammo, not for carry ammo. I don't do it at all, though. For me, it's not worth the hassle.
     
  11. Blinky

    Blinky Rocket Surgeon

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    Welcome to GT!

    Another term you need to know

    JAMBOG- Repost. Normally it's something that has been posted and talked many, many times. Especially don't post the video of the DEA agent that shot himself. Trust me, we have all seen it. :tongueout:


    Also, reloades are sometimes refered to as handloads.
     
  12. TruV6

    TruV6

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    Okay so does that mean that if I buy blasers as practice ammo, new every time, I should not have to really worry about having a KABOOM incident? I'm not really afraid of it occurring, esp. cause people say it rarely happens in a 9mm...but i basically want to stick to the G19 and practice until I become fairly accurate. OH again, thanks for the welcome! also, I will not be creating threads, because I know that the search button is the best friend I have :supergrin: ...just wanted to introduce myself and ask a few questions I have been pondering about.
    -Martin
     
  13. douglasd

    douglasd CLM

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    I would never say "never"...anything is possible. But a KB is very, very rare with good factory loaded 9mm, or any reputable factory load in any caliber, for that matter.

    (That is, unless you do something you shouldn't, like shoot with an obstruction in the barrel, etc.)