Need Help w/Steaks!

Discussion in 'Food Forum' started by Leigh, Nov 21, 2005.

  1. Leigh

    Leigh

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    Grilling noob, here...I use charcoal. The last few have been ok but not great ( I like them medium to medium rare).
    From grocery-to-table please share your tips for preparing a KILLER steak. Cut of meat, thickness, prep, grill time, etc?
    Thanks!
     
  2. hispeedlodrag

    hispeedlodrag needs vacation

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    Buy good meat. Don't let clever supermarket brand/breed names fool you. It is generally around select grade or below. If it is prime or choice, it should have the USDA sticker that connotes this on the package.
    My favorite everyday steaks are skirt steaks and flatiron steaks -- unfortunately, there is not a big market for either and they usually end up in the butcher's burger grinder. For more special occasions I generally buy rib eye or tenderloin.
    I generally use a dry rub that contains some light brown sugar which helps give the meat a char crust. I preheat the grill for about 15 minutes which gets about 700 degrees and flip the meat only once.
    my.02
     

  3. noway

    noway

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    ditto buy a choice cut or prime cut of your favorite steak. I perfer sirloin or ribeye.

    Next seasoning it very good and store cover in the frig for 24hrs.

    Start a wood fire, forget the charcoal, oven and propane grill. Use wood the natural wood or lump charcoal and let you wood burn down to black/red-dish coals and then add you steak and cover the grill top and let it cook. Make sure the fire is hot but not too hot nor any big flames that will burn the meat

    After cooking the steak equally on both sides and to the desired "rareness", add to your plate and with some bake or frenched fired taters. You can use a little finishing sauce, but I personally don't care or like BBQ suace on a steak, it's silly to mask or drown the taste and aroma of the steak with a heavy BBQ sauce. I perfer a Perrin Worcestershire sauce or the A1 zesty suace along with some dijon mustard on the side.


    Bon Appetite
     
  4. revjen45

    revjen45

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    I like rib eye steak myself. Season the steak as desired. I like onion powder, garlic powder, ground pepper, kosher salt, and Worchester Sauce. Poke it all ovr with a fork to let the seasonings penetrate the meat. If you're using a lesser grade of meat papain tenderizer is worth using. Let your fire come to heat. I grill on a propane fire. If you use charcoal, hold your hand over the grill and if it's too hot to hold for over 3 sec it's about right. The idea that charcoal is necessary for correct flavor is debateable, as the vapors arising fom the drippings hitting the plate over the fire impart a lot of the flavor, and propane is a lot cheaper than charcoal. Let the meat come to room temp before placing it on the grill, and sear each side. use a meat thermometer or cut it to monitor condition of the ctr and take it off when it's the right color. Remember you can always cook it some more, but if you ruin it by overcooking you can't cook it less. Bon Appetit.
     
  5. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    hot grill 5 minutes covered flip 4 minutes.

    I will warm steaks in the microwave to remove the chill before cooking.
     
  6. jm_usmc

    jm_usmc Two eagles

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    For medium rare or less you will probably need to stay 3/4" - 1". Make sure the steaks (Rib-eye, porterhouse) have plenty of marbling (small lines of fat in the meat). I only put dry seasonings on my steaks. I usually use red and black peppers (I use a pre-packaged blend called Hot Shot), Garlic powder, Lawry's seasoned salt, and basil. Grill the steak over medium high heat. For medium rare you want about 7 minutes for each side. Turn them half way through about 60 degrees to get the cool criss-cross marks. Flip the steak and repeat on the other side. When the steak is done take it off the grill and let it rest 5 - 10 minutes to let the juices spread back through the steak. If you want the meat really succulent put a pat of butter on the meat while it rests.

    Do not use steaks that have been frozen as they have a 'gritty' texture. And remember, if you take it off too early you can cook it more. If you wait too long it's trash. Err on the side of rare.
     
  7. PDogSniper

    PDogSniper

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    +1

    Buy your steaks from your local mom and pop butchers and not the chain stores. You'll bet better choices and better meat.

    I don't season my steak before or while it's cooking. The sodium in the seasoning will help to draw out the moisture. A good steak doesn't need to be seasoned anyway....

    My personal preference is a Ribeye. Lots of fat marbled throughout giving it good flaver and juiceyness....

    Cook it hot and fast. Take it off the grill a minute or two before you think it's done as it'll continue to cook for a bit afterwards.

    Make sure your coals are white hot and evenly fired. I always tend to use more than I think I need to ensure even cooking.

    I hope you're using a kettle type grill. Purchase some hardwood chunks. Either Hickory, Maple, Apple or Mesquite, experiment with them to find what you preferr. Mesquite is very pungent so a little goes a long way with me. Some will soak the wood chunks in water for 20 minutes or so. This is to keep the wood from burning to quickly. A few minutes before you throw the steaks on the grill put the wood chunks on the fire and let the get going. Put the steaks on the grill and cover with the lid and adjust the vent controls so your smoke is flowing well. You don't want the smoke to sit and not flow...

    This smoke is flowing nicely....

    [​IMG]

    Nicely marbled Ribeyes...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Actually ribs are more fun to cook on the grill. The slow smoking process gives you more time to ingest your favorite brewski, an all important ingredient in grilling.... ;c

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Leigh

    Leigh

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    Thanks for all the great info!
     
  9. stooxie

    stooxie NRA Life Member

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    +1 on most of this.

    Buy good meat, always starts here. The rib eyes in DogSniper's picture look excellent. You don't even need to buy prime meat, just check out the ribeyes on display at the shop and pick the ones with more fat throughout the meat.
    I love ribeyes, They have the best marbeling.

    I salt and pepper them generously about 30 mins before cooking and let them come to room temp. Using salt like this does NOT draw out enough moisture to matter. In fact, it helps form a nice crust. Cover them with a THIN coating of olive oil before cooking.

    Then, grill using the highest heat you can. The "only-flip-once" theory has actually been disproven recently although it still works fine. I tend to flip every 30 seconds to a minute. Sounds crazy but it works great. What happens is that the side on the heat is contracting and sqeezing juices upward. Flip once and all the nice juices
    on the top go straight into your coals or burners.
    Flip multiple times and you caramalize all the goodness
    into a nice crust. If you don't feel like going through
    the effort, the flip once technique will work just fine.

    Then, let them rest for a few mins.

    -Stooxie
     
  10. lwt210

    lwt210

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    We buy good, quality steaks from a local store here that is known for their quality black angus.

    Then, we cook them only over hardwood lump charcoal started only with newspaper in a chimney starter. No petroleum products of any kind get near our steaks. We also toss the Jack Daniels smoking chips (white oak barrels from the distillery that are soaked in water) on the fire when it gets about 500 degrees.

    We use a bourbon basting sauce that has soy, Jack Daniels, lemon, minced onion......you get the idea.

    When cooking them, we flip them a couple of times.....never did make much of a difference with ours cause we cook them at a searing high heat and they cook fast. I slap that basting sauce on there pretty liberally and the flames get to licking up scaring the neighbors.

    As far as cuts are concerned, I prefer a big porterhouse and the wife likes ribeyes and N.Y. strip steaks.

    We let them rest for a few before slicing into them.

    Warning though. Once you have had steaks like this cooked at home, it kind of ruins the going out to eat experience. Even my wife has lost interest in going to some of the high priced restaurants in town and throwing down sixty to seventy bucks for food that is inferior to ours we can do at home for half that price.

    Lump is hard to find around here so we stock up. See what I mean?
     
  11. geminicricket

    geminicricket NRA Life member

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    I don't buy much steak, but the red meat I do buy is almost always top round. It's got less fat than the more popular cuts. I don't grill. I cook in an old aluminum frying pan, with no oil. First, I get the pan as hot as the fire can do in 2 minutes, then I drop the thawed steak upon the pan and let it sit there for 2.5 minutes. Then I turn it over and let it sit there for another 2.5 minutes. Then I take it up and it's medium rare.

    If I want rare, it's 1.5 - 2 minutes. If I want medium, it's 3 minutes. The steaks are about 3/4 inch thick. If I've gotten "thin" steaks, those are done at 1 minute per side, less if you want to try for "rare".

    I know you asked about grilling. Get some steak and try. Pay attention to how hot the fire was and how long you cooked. If it's too done, cook for less time. If it's too rare, cook for more time.
    Hotter fires are better for achieving best rare steaks. You'll be satisfied with your method by the third try.
     
  12. PDogSniper

    PDogSniper

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    +10 on this...! There is only one place where I've gotten a steak that is as good as at home and that was Ruth's Chris Steak House...:cool: I know there's more out there but not around here...
     
  13. wallyglock

    wallyglock

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    keep it simple for me. I do cook on gas and use a smoker box with wood chips or pellets and they are always super. we try to go to MARSH stores here in central indiana--why? they are the only ones that advertise and sell the certified black angus gold cuts of beef! there IS a big difference in the grade of meat you buy and cook up, more so than any particular cooking method you will use. the new york strips are our favorite cuts. these are lean, but in the angus gold line, they have the rich taste of a rib-eye! (about 9 $ lb. on sale) start grill on medium high and sear in juices on each side, for about 5-6 minutes. 1-1 1/2" thick are great. then just slow cook untill temp. reaches around 160 degrees(170 is well done for beef, 160 is about med. well) by all means use a meat thermoter! if you are using this or similar cuts of a super grade of beef, you can let the steak stand on its own great taste, without any rubs, additives, or a lot of extra seasoning to enhance a already graet flamed grilled flavor...!
     
  14. PDogSniper

    PDogSniper

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    Well, you can't condemn a man for trying...;)
     
  15. lwt210

    lwt210

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    Oh yeah, we also use butter on our grill grates when they are good and hot to keep from sticking and to give the steaks killer grill marks.

    Here is that basting sauce recipe....good on steak and pork chops....make you slap somebody it is so good. Makes your back yard smell like a SteakOut.

    We double this for plenty good steaks/chops.

    one lemon
    1/2 cup Kikoman's soy
    3 tablespoons butter
    2 tablespoons Tennessee sipping whisky (sip some to make sure it is fresh while you are cooking ;f )
    1 tablespoon dried minced onion
    1/4 teaspoon hot sauce (we use Texas Pete/has a good flavor)
    1/8 teaspoon coarse Kosher salt
    1/8 teaspoon of fresh ground pepper outta your pepper mill set on coarse.

    Cut the lemon(s) and squeeze into a sauce pan through your fingers to catch the seeds. Put on medium heat with the rest of the ingredients. Cut up the lemon halves and add them to the pot. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer for about five while the lump is coming up to temp.

    We get ours about 500 degrees and then start by dunking the steaks in the sauce before throwing them on the grill. Once they are all on, I brush some more on making sure to get the niblets of onion at the bottom of the pan onto the steaks. Repeat and repeat some more as you turn them.

    Don't use a fork to turn them.....buy some good tongs. Avoid stabbing the meat as this will rob it of juices. Cook them to your level of preferred doneness.

    You can reserve some of this basting sauce to pour over the top of your cuts when they are done and plattered. Let them rest for a while and enjoy.

    Incidentally, nothing better than a smoked baked potato to go along with it.

    Stab spuds with a fork liberally, coat them with melted butter, salt and coarse pepper, toss them onto your grill with a medium heat for an hour or so. Make sure to use some hickory chips for plenty good smoke.

    Wife will toss a salad with some good veggies and vinagrette dressing...........some ice cold beer..........I usually eat so much I have to lie down in the living room and suffer.
     
  16. PDogSniper

    PDogSniper

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    ;z +;c

    lwt, I don't think it would serve us well if you and I ever got together for a cook out but it'd sure as hell be a good time at the moment...;f
     
  17. cmzneb

    cmzneb

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    Best quality cuts for grilling:

    Strip
    Ribeye
    Filet/Tenderloin
    T Bone/Porterhouse


    "USDA CHOICE" If it does not say USDA CHOICE, then don't expect much out of it. Don't fall for grocery store attempts to trick you, where they will say "Butchers Choice", "Blue Ribbon Choice" ,etc...

    Look for lots of little flecks of fat marbled throughout the meat. Most retail shoppers make the mistake of looking for the leanest piece of meat with no fat marbled throughout the meat. Those marbled flecks of fat melt when cooking and in turn flavor and tenderize the meat.


    Season generously with "Montreal Steak Seasoning"
     
  18. lwt210

    lwt210

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    Yeah, I don't think my neighbors could take two guys on my deck, lump charcoal red hot, flames shooting up into the sky with embers exploding when we dump the chimney starter into the firebox, two offset smokers full of ribs and such, half empty bottle of whiskey, Hoppes solvent soaked patches laying everywhere, a 1911 disassembled.......yeah, I can see that now.

    I could have used some company today.....I thought my turkey breasts were never going to reach 175. I planned on a four hour cook and it turned into almost six. The wife was a little peeved cause her side dishes were siting idle and she weren't happy at all.

    She got happy when she dipped that first nugget of hickory smoked turkey into some white sauce and sampled it. Sure glad they turned out as juicy as they did. She was hating there for a minute.;f
     
  19. Roro

    Roro

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    Ok now, do you miss me that much that you want to smell me when you're at home?

    Steaks... UGH! I can't stand the slaughtered cow things.

    Just kidding. I love steak, except when I am at work.. I hate it. I have to cook it. and cook LOTS of it.

    My favorite "rub" for steaks.

    Amounts vary by taste:

    Cayenne Pepper (i like lots)
    Garlic salt
    Onion Powder (just a little bit)
    Fresh Ground Pepper

    Im not kidding you, my rub smells like powdered OC spray.. I use and run.

    Now I like to put that on my steaks just before they get on the grill. Flip em fast, flip em a few times.


    As far as sticking to the grill.. I like olive oil. butter can work but it burns too easy.
     
  20. PDogSniper

    PDogSniper

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    Hey, they make good firestarters....;f