close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

need adivce from NYC locals......

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by rtl, Mar 10, 2012.

  1. rtl

    rtl Robby The Guy Millennium Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 1999
    Messages:
    873
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Wichita
    so my daughter is moving to NYC this fall for a 16 month culinary school, and is currently looking for apts. her best friend is coming with, and the two of them plan to get a cheap 1 bedroom in manhattan somewhere.

    they're hoping to stay below $1100, which limits the options, but we have found a few in that price range....but we don't know the safety of these neigborhoods for anything. so my question is, are there def areas for these two girls from kansas to stay away from? the areas north of central park have the most hits for that price range, which may be alright.....or may not. help us out please
     
  2. Sig Junkie

    Sig Junkie

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2011
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    stay away from manhattan. 1,100 goes a lot further in queens or brooklyn and the train rides aren't that bad of a commute
     

  3. rtl

    rtl Robby The Guy Millennium Member

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 1999
    Messages:
    873
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Wichita
  4. joker42179

    joker42179

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2008
    Messages:
    1,221
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Fl
    the area north of central park is considered Harlem and honestly is not the place you want your daughter living
     
  5. CAcop

    CAcop

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2002
    Messages:
    21,762
    Likes Received:
    4,283
    Location:
    California
    I google mapped "Harlem" and came up with this. http://maps.google.com/maps?rls=com.microsoft:en-us:IE-Address&oe=UTF-8&rlz=1I7GGHP_en&q=harlem&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hq=&hnear=0x89c2f66e2188a29f:0xb408afef09e2702e,Harlem,+New+York,+NY&gl=us&ei=AlVdT_SZAuiWiALkiMGyCw&sa=X&oi=geocode_result&ct=image&resnum=2&ved=0CDYQ8gEwAQ

    It looks like north of Central Park is indeed Harlem. I have heard it is not as bad as the Bronx but that isn't saying much.

    What does the school offer in terms of helping to find housing? What about other colleges with housing offices?
     
  6. SSNimrod

    SSNimrod

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    0
    Where in Manhatten is your daughter going to school?

    Harlem gets a bad rap.
     
  7. Hollytheninja

    Hollytheninja

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2012
    Messages:
    50
    Likes Received:
    0
    I had to live in NYC for a few months for work about 2 years ago. I was in a similar situation to your daughter as a 22 y/o girl fresh out of college.

    Forget about $1100 apartments in Manhattan. They with either end up living in an absolute ****hole of an apartment or they'd end up in Harlem (north of central park). All I'll say is that I wouldn't feel safe walking around Harlem after dark.


    I ended up living out in Greenpoint in Brooklyn. Rent is much more reasonable there (but still not cheap) and its a much nicer and safer area. Got a really nice 6th floor fully furnished apartment for $1500 a month in an elevator building with a great view of the city, just off Manhattan Ave. For $1100 or so you could get something pretty decent. I know similar apartments in my building on lower floors without a view were $100-$200 cheaper, which is getting a little closer to your budget. Getting into the city was easy, maybe 30-40 minutes in the morning including walking time. I used 30 day metrocards, they give you unlimited use of the subway so you can get anywhere in the city easily. They're about $100, so try to budget for that. Heres some pics of my place

    The building from the outside

    [​IMG]

    View from my place during the day

    [​IMG]

    And at night

    [​IMG]
     
  8. m2hmghb

    m2hmghb

    Joined:
    May 27, 2002
    Messages:
    8,674
    Likes Received:
    55
    Location:
    Livin in the country of NJ
    If possible it would be better to live outside the city near a train line and commute into the city. There are parts of NJ and NY that aren't bad to live in and you can get a 2 br apt for less then 1100 a month and use the rest on the commute.
     
  9. Palmetto Sig .357

    Palmetto Sig .357

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    I currently live in NYC (originally from down south) and agree with most of the advice stated above. The don't live north of Central Park is still fairly accurate. Honestly, most of Manhattan is safe south of Harlem day or night these days. Even in most of the "bad areas" if you walk with a purpose and don't look like a tourist your fine. Other things to consider: 1) Forget about bringing a car. You don't need one and its a hassle to figure out the complicated parking rules (much less find a spot). 2) live near the train 3) Get a nice grocery cart (seriously, you are going to walk to the store a lot).

    $1100 is tough to do in Manhattan. Studios are going for $2300 plus there and in all honesty I have no desire to live there. Everything is noticeably more expensive compared to the other boroughs and in my experience (sorry Manhattan residents) the people are not as friendly. Plus, other than central park, good luck getting sunlight or seeing trees/grass.

    However, $1100 is doable in Queens or Brooklyn. Just be very, very careful when your looking as a lot of places listed on line in a certain area are actually in a less desirable area close by. Google Map the address and compare that to the established neighborhood boundaries. Also use Street View to see what the area actually looks like.

    I have little experience with Queens in general so I can't honestly give an opinion about neighborhoods there. However, for better or worse I have been to every neighborhood in Brooklyn. First avoid the following areas: 1) Brownsville or anywhere within a 20 block radius of that place. Women and children get shot in broad daylight there. It is far more dangerous than the South Bronx. 2) Bed Sty. It has been up and coming for a long time, but still a ways to go. Its tricky because some of the streets really look nice. There are a lot of apts. listed on craigslist there FYI. 3) Crown Heights. Not as bad as Brownsville, but still a lot of street violence. 4) Bushwick. Again up and coming, but don't live there. 5) Sunset Park. Often called Park Slope West online. Its not Park Slope (one of the best areas in NYC) trust me. There are more bad areas, but those are my top ones. Generally in Brooklyn, the closer to the water or Prospect Park you are the better.

    In Brooklyn, I suggest looking at Fort Green, Bayridge, and Ditmas Park (a great place that almost no one knows about). If they are willing to spend a little more (i.e. $1700) there are places to be found in Brooklyn Heights, Cobble Hill, Park Slope, Boreum Hill, and Clinton Hill, but you really, really have to look and sacrifice size. 500 sq. ft. is considered a big place at that price.

    If you have any other questions, or want to run a neighborhood or street by me, feel free to shoot me a message. If I haven't been there, I can ask some NYPD friends of mine about it. That brings me to my last point, if you ever need help or have a question in NYC just ask an NYPD officer. They seemingly everywhere (esp. in Manhattan) and from my experience are very helpful if you're polite about it.
     
  10. happy seal

    happy seal

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2007
    Messages:
    3,944
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Look in Staten Island and get her a ferry pass as the commute! Or Ct, Stamford area and train it.
     
  11. HollowHead

    HollowHead Firm member

    Joined:
    May 16, 2005
    Messages:
    25,006
    Likes Received:
    3,034
    Location:
    Where the buffalo roam
    For my first two years at NYU, I commuted from Bay Ridge/Sunset Park Brooklyn. I moved to Manhattan after hooking up with three other guys and we could afford a half-loft for $3K divided by four. We could bring our motorcycles in at night because of the cage elevator, and this was '81-'82 around Cooper Union. HH
     
  12. CourtCop

    CourtCop Millennium Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 1999
    Messages:
    522
    Likes Received:
    40
    Location:
    Brodheadsville, PA
    I work in NY Supreme Court Criminal Term in lower Mahattan handling felony cases and I would have to say 80-90% of our "customers" come from north of Central Park. Washington Heights and Harlem are a whole different world compared to most of the rest of Manhattan.

    Outdoor Hub mobile, the outdoor information engine
     
  13. sputnik767

    sputnik767

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2007
    Messages:
    8,536
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Chicago
    Below $1100 each, or combined? If you are looking for a 1 bedroom apt for that price, you're pretty much limited to uptown, aka Harlem. I live here now, and my studio is $1200, but it's in a secure building with a doorman. Needless to say, Harlem is not the best area but is probably the most affordable in Manhattan. If you are looking for something at $1100 each, you can get a 2-bedroom for that price in a nice area such as upper west side or upper east or midtown east. From what I can tell, the east side tends to be cheaper. You can also look into East Village and West Village, as well as the NYU area. Lots of young people there, and is generally a fun area to be in. Also, you need to consider where her school is in relation to where she is living. For example, going uptown or downtown is easy by train, but if the school is on the east side and she lives on the west side, going crosstown is a pain. It requires taking a crosstown bus, but a bus to train transfer is free within about 2 hours. As far as the suggestions of Brooklyn and Queens, that's definitely a cheaper option, but you have to look into the commute. There are people who commute for almost 2 hours to my school, whereas I walk there in 15 mins or drive in the evening. If there is one thing I can recommend is that the apartment not face an avenue. NYC is generally laid out with avenues running up and down, and streets running across. If you live facing the avenues, it gets very loud.

    As far as Harlem goes, I've been living here for almost 2 years, and it was not uncommon for me to walk a mile from school to my apt past midnight. It's not nearly as bad as people make it out to be, but I certainly would not want a girl to be walking here alone at night. Daytime and evening is fine though, and plenty of my female classmates live here. I'm on 133rd street. However, I don't like it for many reasons that I'm not going to get into, and will be moving to Queens next year because of necessity. In case anyone is wondering, Columbia University is technically in Harlem, although the 10 blocks or so that comprise the Columbia area are very nice, just like the upper west side.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2012