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I don't buy knives from people that don't make knives.
SPRINGFIELD -- Springfield gun maker Smith & Wesson announced Monday that it will buy its knife-making partner Taylor Brands for $85 million.
Founded in 1975 and based in Tennessee, Taylor Brands owns and produces Schrade, Old Timer, Uncle Henry and Imperial branded products. Taylor Brands also manufactures knives and one type of outdoor camp ax under the Smith & Wesson brand name through a licensing agreement.


 

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They were decent 15 years ago when made in these U.S.
 

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Still no. Low tier private label.
How are those brands with Chinese manufactured products different than any other Chinese-made blade offerings, presuming good QC standards are required and maintained by the US parent companies?

Granted, some of those older American knife company names and products may not be quite the same as in their early days. Even so ...

I've picked up some examples of the various brands, out of curiosity, and I've found some of them have been pretty impressive when it came to assembly, fit & finish. The long term quality of the blade steel remains to be seen, but early observations with the ones I've bought seem pretty decent. At least on a par, and some better, than the popular name brands who outsource much (or most) of their manufacturing to China.

A couple of the S&W branded folders I've tried in the last couple of years have been surprisingly nicely done regarding the visual quality of assembly and materials used. Better than a couple of the other bigger name offerings of Chinese-made knives I've been trying.

Comes to that, I've had better luck with some of the Chinese-made pocket knives than with some American-made Case knives I've ordered.

I remember when Made in Japan was used as a derogatory term for products, but that changed, because American companies demanded better and Japanese manufacturers responded. It won't be shocking if Made in China follows the same path. We (American companies and consumers) just have to demand better. Well, presuming we don't end up in turbulent waters in our relationship with China ... if/after they reacquire Taiwan. :ROFLMAO: That would certainly put a dent in the whole Made in Taiwan industry.
 
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How are those brands with Chinese manufactured products different than any other Chinese-made blade offerings, presuming good QC standards are required and maintained by the US parent companies?

Granted, some of those older American knife company names and products may not be quite the same as in their early days. Even so ...

I've picked up some examples of the various brands, out of curiosity, and I've found some of them have been pretty impressive when it came to assembly, fit & finish. The long term quality of the blade steel remains to be seen, but early observations with the ones I've bought seem pretty decent. At least on a par, and some better, than the popular name brands who outsource much (or most) of their manufacturing to China.

A couple of the S&W branded folders I've tried in the last couple of years have been surprisingly nicely done regarding the visual quality of assembly and materials used. Better than a couple of the other bigger name offerings of Chinese-made knives I've been trying.

Comes to that, I've had better luck with some of the Chinese-made pocket knives than with some American-made Case knives I've ordered.

I remember when Made in Japan was used as a derogatory term for products, but that changed, because American companies demanded better and Japanese manufacturers responded. It won't be shocking if Made in China follows the same path. We (American companies and consumers) just have to demand better. Well, presuming we don't end up in turbulent waters in our relationship with China ... if/after they reacquire Taiwan. :ROFLMAO: That would certainly put a dent in the whole Made in Taiwan industry.
I didn't mention a country of origin. Tons of good knives come from many countries.

All the brands you listed are bottom tier companies that produce flea market priced and quality of knives.

If you like them, enjoy them.

My tastes range a little higher.
 

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I didn't mention a country of origin. Tons of good knives come from many countries.

All the brands you listed are bottom tier companies that produce flea market priced and quality of knives.

If you like them, enjoy them.

My tastes range a little higher.
Ah, you see some of the older American standards as now being bottom tier. Aside from Imperial, the rest of them weren't common flea market knives in my youth, nor were they "bargain knife jar" brands. I remember when Pete Gerber and Pete Kershaw knives were considered good, but not great (budget steels). Imported steel from Japan helped reduce costs. Ka-Bar and Camillus were good, but not great.

Buck was affordable, and a decent value for the buck. (Pun intended.) G96 made budget offerings using imported knives from Japan.

Puma was costly, and their offerings were "Pumaster" (carbon) or Inox (stainless) from Germany? Too rich for my blood as a young man, so I made do with Buck, Gerber, Old Timer, Rigid, Ka-Bar and Camillus.

Spyderco was a nice brand to come around many years ago, and they were reasonably budget-priced at the time.

Personally, I won't spend more than $200 for a folder nowadays, with an exception for one of the Emersons, perhaps, just because of the man and the company. I'm still considering ordering one. (I picked up a couple of the affordably priced CQC licensed Benchmade copies in the 90's.)

Except for that 'exception', nowadays the manufacturing technology and availability of great steels that can be used in production-made folders is bringing the costs down for some very good quality products that would've been much more expensive in earlier days of custom makers.

Even Buck is offering affordably priced knives with USA made S30V or S35VN.

Matter of fact, I've been on a bit of a nostalgia kick lately, adding some new production Buck 110/112's to my collection. My original 110 is from when they used 440C.

I'm finding I'm getting more enjoyment from some of the new Bucks than my Benchmade folders.
 

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Ah, you see some of the older American standards as now being bottom tier. Aside from Imperial, the rest of them weren't common flea market knives in my youth, nor were they "bargain knife jar" brands. I remember when Pete Gerber and Pete Kershaw knives were considered good, but not great (budget steels). Imported steel from Japan helped reduce costs. Ka-Bar and Camillus were good, but not great.

Buck was affordable, and a decent value for the buck. (Pun intended.) G96 made budget offerings using imported knives from Japan.

Puma was costly, and their offerings were "Pumaster" (carbon) or Inox (stainless) from Germany? Too rich for my blood as a young man, so I made do with Buck, Gerber, Old Timer, Rigid, Ka-Bar and Camillus.

Spyderco was a nice brand to come around many years ago, and they were reasonably budget-priced at the time.

Personally, I won't spend more than $200 for a folder nowadays, with an exception for one of the Emersons, perhaps, just because of the man and the company. I'm still considering ordering one. (I picked up a couple of the affordably priced CQC licensed Benchmade copies in the 90's.)

Except for that 'exception', nowadays the manufacturing technology and availability of great steels that can be used in production-made folders is bringing the costs down for some very good quality products that would've been much more expensive in earlier days of custom makers.

Even Buck is offering affordably priced knives with USA made S30V or S35VN.

Matter of fact, I've been on a bit of a nostalgia kick lately, adding some new production Buck 110/112's to my collection. My original 110 is from when they used 440C.

I'm finding I'm getting more enjoyment from some of the new Bucks than my Benchmade folders.

No, not all of them. But many of them have been left far behind in regards to what is available today.

If it weren't for Paul and his heat treat Buck would be in that list as well.

Manufacturing progresses. Many of those other companies never did.

Hell, even Surefire is guilty of resting on their laurels.

Want to become a low tier company? Don't improve your product for 50 years, have some one private label your junk and sell them in bulk, packaged in old plastic pickled egg jugs at Circle K.

That's how you earn a bottom tier reputation.
 

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I bought this S&W knife on impulse, at a gun show about 25 years ago. It was less than $20. It has, at times served as EDC, it has gone on backpack trips, it has been tossed in a checked suitcase, as a walking around knife on trips. It has aluminum handles that fits the hand well, and the blade profile works very well for me.
I definitely got my $18 worth.
Grey Knife Wood Tool Blade
 

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Life's too short for cheap beer... or knives ;)
Yep. Too short for bad beer, cigars, bourbon ... and knives and guns.

However, inexpensive doesn't automatically mean cheap. Sometimes we get lucky and something decent can come along that's not cheaply made, but inexpensive. (At least for a moment in time.)
 
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