close

Privacy guaranteed - Your email is not shared with anyone.

Neat XB-70 pic

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by JTR, Nov 23, 2004.

  1. JTR

    JTR

    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2004
    Location:
    Oregon
    I really love the XB-70 (got to see her this last summer) and I have been gleaning pics off the net for a while. I had never seen this one before and thought some of you guys might also be fans and like to see if you haven’t already.

    It’s one photograph that shows both Air Vehicles!

    Nothing extraordinary I suppose, I’ve just never seen them both in one photograph.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Mwinter

    Mwinter I'm MilkMan Dan

    Messages:
    1,208
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2001
    always had a soft spot for the Valkyrie and it's lil bro, the A12/YF12/SR71.
     

  3. JTR

    JTR

    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2004
    Location:
    Oregon
    I got to see the YF-12A at WPAFB too. It’s really cool seeing an “SR-71” with missile bay doors and a seat for a Fire Control Officer.
     
  4. CaptainOveur

    CaptainOveur

    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2004
    Location:
    Prescott
    Yeah, the XB70 is one of my favorites. First mach3 turbine aircraft. Unfortunatly they had a lot of problems with engines failing and the skin heating up too much, but it had a lot of new technology and proved that mach3 was possible.
     
  5. NetNinja

    NetNinja Always Faithful

    Messages:
    967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2001
    Location:
    HotLanta, GA
    Wow! That is a very rare pic.
    Where did you get it?
    I'd say it's extraordinary because of the fact that very few were manufactured.

    My dad used to work on B58 Hustlers, he told me he had a bunch of pictures but I never saw them.
     
  6. CaptainOveur

    CaptainOveur

    Messages:
    250
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2004
    Location:
    Prescott
    There were 2. One crashed when an fighter (F4?) rolled into it and destroyed the tail.
     
  7. HKMark23

    HKMark23 Millennium Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 17, 1999
    Location:
    Chez Bippy
    [​IMG]
    On 8 June, 1966, one of aviation's most tragic accidents occured in the skies over the Mojave Desert. After an early morning flight test sortie in XB-70 Air Vehicle #2 (AV/2), pilots Al White and Major Carl Cross rendezvoused with a flight of four fighter-type aircraft and a Lear Jet. The idea was to group the fighters in formation around the XB-70 while photographers aboard the Lear Jet documented the event. All five aircraft were powered by General Electric engines, and the photos were to be used in GE advertising.

    After over forty minutes of formation photo work, disaster struck. One of the fighters, a Lockheed/NASA F-104 flown by NASA chief test pilot Joe Walker, moved too close to the XB-70 ultimately resulting in a collision. The F-104 (NASA serial number 013) was caught in the XB-70's wing tip vortices, and then flipped over onto the top of the massive bomber. Joe Walker was killed instantly as the XB-70's twin vertical tails were torn away. The F-104 exploded and fell to Earth in at least three pieces. The crew of the XB-70, initially unaware of the collision, continued in straight and level flight for 16 seconds, eventually to enter a unrecoverable flat spin. Al White ejected in the final few seconds, but tragically, Major Cross lost his life when the XB-70 impacted the ground. The pieces of Walker's F-104 came to rest nearly six kilometers to the north. In a matter of seconds, two brave men and two valuable aircraft had been lost.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    RIP boys ;? ;? ;? ;? ;? ;?
     
  8. Neal

    Neal Millennium Member

    Messages:
    652
    Likes Received:
    7
    Joined:
    Jan 2, 1999
    Location:
    Indiana
    HK Mark 23,

    Thanks for posting the photos. I have read the story before, but my book had no photos of the accident. Very sobering......

    Neal
     
  9. HKMark23

    HKMark23 Millennium Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 17, 1999
    Location:
    Chez Bippy
    Yes it is.
    Things can go bad in an instant no matter who you are.
    Here are a few more with more info.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    As the photo shoot progressed, the photographers asked several times for the formation to close up, until all five planes were in close proximity, and had been for over 45 minutes. Finally, at 9:26am, the photographers were done, and everyone prepared to break formation and return to Edwards.

    Disaster struck at this moment as somehow, Walker's F-104 collided with the Valkyrie. The complex airflow surrounding the XB-70 lifted the F-104 over her back, spun the Starfighter around 180 degrees, causing it to smash down along the center of the Valkyrie's wing, tearing off both vertical stabilizers and damaging the left wingtip before falling away in flames. Already, Joe Walker, one of America's greatest pilots, was dead.

    Al White and Carl Cross heard the impact, but felt nothing. Flying in the T-38 off the left wingtip, Joe Cotton called out "207 (identifying AV/2) you've been hit! You've been hit!" But in those first moments, neither White nor Cross heard the call. Even as Cotton continued "...okay, you're doing fine, he got the verticals, but you're still doing fine," White turned to Cross and asked, "I wonder who got hit?"

    16 seconds after the impact, the XB-70 started a slight roll. Al White corrected the roll -- and instantly recognized the Valkyrie's peril as she began a snap roll to the right. Ramming the number six engine's throttle to maximum afterburner, he tried to save AV/2 -- but after 2 slow rolls, the plane broke into a sickening spin, taking any hopes of recovery with it.

    White pushed his seat back into the eject position, but caught his arm in the ejection pod's clamshell doors as they closed. Unable to communicate with the struggling Carl Cross, and unable to eject until getting his arm clear, White could only watch his co-pilot fail to get into his pod for ejection. Finally, with the realization that he needed to get out now, Al White worked his arm clear and ejected just moments before AV/2 slammed into the ground a few miles north of Barstow, California.

    Although the drogue chutes deployed from White's pod, he realized the airbag underneath the pod -- designed to absorb much of the impact -- had failed to inflate. Striking the ground, White took a 44G impact -- lessened to 33Gs as his chair broke free of its mountings. Amazingly, although banged, battered, and bruised, he suffered no broken bones. Although White returned to flight status just three months later, he never flew the XB-70 again.

    Carl Cross was not so lucky. Unable to escape the Valkyrie, and still strapped into his seat, he was killed instantly when the B-70 struck the ground in an upright and level configuration.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Here is Joe Walkers F-104
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  10. JTR

    JTR

    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    2
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2004
    Location:
    Oregon
    Thanks for all the great info HKMark23, it’s cool to see another enthusiast out there.

    NetNinja, I was thinking it’s an extraordinary pic too. That’s both Air Vehicles in one pic. They only built two and they’re both right there; I have never seen any other pics with both AV sin it. I would love to have one of both of them flying side by side, but I don’t think that ever happened.