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Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by Alchemy, Apr 12, 2006.

  1. Alchemy

    Alchemy Senior Member

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    My 14 y/o nephew has as his home page. How do I block asscess
    to this sight?

    Thanks
     
  2. jack19512

    jack19512

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    I am no computer expert and I know you are going to get a much better answer to your question than my answer.

    But, I use a free pop-up-blocker called Popup Killer 1.43 and when on a site you can manually add their url to the black list and it will terminate it instantly.

    Just a suggestion just in case you don't get any other replies. If you need to know more just let me know.
     

  3. HAVOC

    HAVOC Remember CLM Millennium Member

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    The quickest way, assuming your running windows and without having to buy any software, is to edit the PC's hosts file.

    You may have to unhide some options in Explorer (not internet explorer) but in Windows XP it exists in the C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc directory. It's called "hosts", no dot anything, just "hosts". Double click on it, and when Windows asks you what to open it with, pick notepad. It's just a text file.

    The last line should read something like

    127.0.0.1 localhost

    Add the line

    127.0.0.1 myspace.com

    Save and close. Now any time that PC tries to get to myspace.com, it'll just be talking to itself and get nowhere.

    Have you considered just unplugging it when he doesn't stay away as he's told?
     
  4. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    Your router should have a firewall. Good firewall on a home router should have content blocking and address blocking. If you are not using a router with a good firewall, you should. In my opinion, no personal firewall on Windows comes close to the reliability of a hardware solution (and it is faster and cannot be disabled by your kid).
     
  5. RMTactical

    RMTactical Battle Born CLM

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    You are wise to want to protect him from this site. It's full of predators. Not a week goes by where I don't hear of some issue that site has had with predators. This is coming from someone who has a family member who was preyed on by a internet predator.

    I noticed my teenage brother and sister had accounts on myspace and were using it frequently on my parents computer. I blocked the site in explorer by going to "tools", then "internet options", "content", "content advisor", and "approved sites" and just blocked it on there.

    I'm sure there are better ways to block it than that.

    It's funny, when I first heard about the site in the beginning I just knew it would be trouble for naive and stupid kids, and even some smart kids. Kids just aren't responsible enough to be on there, the predators are sneaky man. They really are, and you just have to be VERY careful about the info you are allowing others to know about you. Kids can put themselves and their entire families at risk by ignorantly posting personal info...

    I know you don't need this lecture. You obviously already know about some of the dangers. I'm just rambling because I told several people in my family (including in-laws) about this and they never listened to me at first... I swear, I'm not making this stuff up... It just got annoying telling people and having them blow you off... and this is the kind of thing I just hate being right about when they refuse to listen...

    :soap:
     
  6. m2hmghb

    m2hmghb

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    I'm on that site. I gotta agree it aint for kids at all. In fact it annoys the hell out of me that kids are on there. The only reason I'm on there is for the Lyme support group the firearms group and to try and see if i can find old friends, and yes chat up the ocasional girl. That said if you aint smart enough to realize the kind of danger that place can get you in you should not be using a computer in the first place.
     
  7. MLM

    MLM

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    If you have a firewall up and running you should be able to ban the IP address of myspace.
    They are:
    • 63.208.226.219
      63.208.226.24 - 63.208.226.28
      63.208.226.40 - 63.208.226.43
    pretty much covers it.
     
  8. lomfs24

    lomfs24

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    I don't mean to burst anyone's bubble here. But all of the solutions so far can simply be circumvented by using anyone of hundreds of sites like this one http://www.unipeak.com/ I think another one is www.shysurfer.com although I couldn't get it to come up at the moment. I would have to agree with Gorelicks that the most powerful tool you have is education. Sit down and have a heart to heart with nephew and let them know what kind of danger he is putting himself and his family. Do a little research beforehand so you have some recent examples of people who it didn't turn out so well for.

    For every road block on the information highway, there is a detour. Education is the only cure.
     
  9. David_G17

    David_G17 /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

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    as stated above, you might block him for about a day.
     
  10. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    What bubble exactly are you bursting here?

    So? They can be blocked, too. Of course there are ways to go around many of such protections. You have to stay a step ahead. Any protection is certainly better than no protection. If you're vigilant, you can foil many clever plots.

    That's a great soundbite. Propose that solution to your corporate network administrator.
     
  11. tarpleyg

    tarpleyg

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    Sure, they can be blocked too...and you know what? Tomorrow he'll find another IP spoof site and keep on chugging. Parents (and uncles in this case) need to learn how to parent and quit relying on technology to solve problems like this.

    I am an IT manager, security specifically. I cannot tell you how many times I have had a store manager call me and say they need to block so-and-so's access to XYZ because they are not getting any work done.

    I ask them what they would do if they walked by so-and-so's desk and he/she was sitting there reading a Sports Illustrated or Playboy. They always say the same thing--they'd tell 'em to knock it off and get back to work (and in some instances fire them for inappropriate material).

    I then ask them if they can see a parallel and you can hear the light bulb click on (car sales managers aren't very sharp) in their mind.

    I then pose the question--how is your lack of management my problem again? Same thing applies here.

    Greg
     
  12. lomfs24

    lomfs24

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    Yes, if you are vigilant you can foil many problems. However, as the old saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound if cure. I see so many people trying to put bandaids on problems when they should be fixing the problem. The problem here is the youngster doesn't see the danger in sites such as this. The bandaid is blocking the site not giving the youngster a reason not to go to the site on his own.

    The second problem with this attitude is that you will continue to be vigilant, day in day out, for the rest of your life. Blocking one site after another until you have a black list a mile long. Then you have to stay up on what sites will circumvent that bandaid you just put on. You will spend 24 hours a day staying vigilant.

    This thread is not about corporate america. It's about family. If the message was for corporate america the education would be, "You are an adult, don't go to these sites." Have your network setup to flag and log IP addresses that visit inapproriate sites. Warn the trouble maker once fire him the second time. After a couple people get fired the inapropriate network traffic would be reduced to nill.

    But since you can't fire a nephew you have to educate him one on one.
     
  13. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    I see. Are you then suggesting we should stop using technology and just rely on sound advice? Hell, that should stop all our network problems. After all, malicious users are just like teenagers - they listed to reason and immediately apply that knowledge in life.

    Yeah, right.

    It's nice to explain things and talk about them, but unless you show you are serious about enforcement and make an effort, you might as well spit against the wind because no one (certainly not teenagers) is going to take you seriously.

    So, I take it as a security manager you just issue memos to employees, or do you not practice what you preach?

    And what about your network admin? Does he also not enforce proper bandwidth use policies, and instead just asks that no one abuse bandwidth?

    I deal a lot with colleges and universities that have all kinds of policies on bandwidth use. Until they install proper equipment and show serious effort, their bandwidth usage consists primarily of illegal music downloads. Why? Because their users are mostly teenagers. Oh, but I am sure it must be because the network administrators did not speak to them in caring-enough terms. Yeah, that must be it.
     
  14. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    In case you do not remember what it's like to be a teenager (unless you were the only perfect one on the planet) - teenagers do not listen. Sometimes as a parent you have to assume the responsibility for stopping your offspring from hurting himself whether he listens to you or not, even if it means taking repetetive steps.

    Or are you going to say later, "well, he should have listened"?
     
  15. Alchemy

    Alchemy Senior Member

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    Thank you guy's for all your responses, unfortunately my nephew
    is very bright with computers. So this just might take some
    work on my side to see that he doesn't figure out how to
    unblock it.
     
  16. lomfs24

    lomfs24

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    No, I was not a perfect teenager. But I reaped the consequenses. If we are going to take the responsibility for stopping our offspring from hurting themselves maybe we should block myspace, yahoo, hotornot, msm, AOL, hell we should just disconnect the computer. But what if he finds a violent game to play? Maybe we should take his computer away. Then he might start watching TV. Who knows what all is shown on there. Better take the TV away. What if he goes outside and smacks himself with a baseball bat? Better take the bat away. He then might ride a bike. What happens if he falls over? Better take the bike away. I have a good idea... Let's just put him in a padded round room with a straight jacket. Then he'll be safe.

    No, later I will say, "I am glad I had that talk with him. Believe it or not, he listened." Seems like in today's world disipline is a curse word. When I was a kid I received disipline. And yes, it did have lasting emotional effects on me. Those emotional effects are respect for authority, good work ethics, and responsibility. I don't think kids today would be hurt in the least by the same.
     
  17. feetpiece

    feetpiece Unforgiven

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    You ain't kidding, look at this sick bastard...
     
  18. David_G17

    David_G17 /\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

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    i've heard this is good, but haven't looked into it:

    http://www.bsafehome.com/

    "Published cracks and teen “work arounds” abound for most other Internet filtering software packages - there are none for Bsafe Online’s parental control software. And there are no local files that can be hacked or edited to get around the filter..."
     
  19. RMTactical

    RMTactical Battle Born CLM

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    Well, what do you know? Just when I think my opinion of the site and some of the people on there couldn't get any worse...

    :supergrin:
     
  20. Bullwinkle J Moose

    Bullwinkle J Moose Quick! Duck!

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    Instead of an on-going censorship effort, why not talk with the youngster and explain your concerns about the dangers of the website and fully explain why not to post any information that the child wouldn't want his teacher, principle, preacher, parents and the rest of the world to see. You cannot shield a kid their entire life and it's a better long-term solution to teach them to cope with the dangers that exist.