Glock 17 My G17L is stovepiping

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by Broadsword22, May 30, 2007.

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  1. Broadsword22

    Broadsword22

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    I took my G17L out this morning and shot it with some standard US made commercial ball ammo. I was using all factory Glock magazines. 17 round and 33 round. When my wife and 18 year old son were shooting it they were getting stovepipe FTE malfunctions where the spent case was ending up jammed in the action with the case mouth pointing straight up. I never did have it do this to me but it did it to both of them several times over the course of aprox 150-175 rounds. I did watch as my son was shooting and instead of tossing the spent brass well away from the pistol it was just kinda tossing them straight up about an inch or so. I did have a piece of brass come back and smack me in the forehead once but I just shrugged it off as a fluke.
    What's going on with my pistol? Other than the ejection issue it shot great and really took me by surprise with it's accuracy. I didn't expect a bone stock Glock 9mm to shoot as well as it did.
    Any ideas?
    Limp wristing was my first thought as to a cause of this so I shot it myself intentionally limp wristing it and it didn't fail. We were shooting my G22 at the same time and no one had a single issue with it.
    Broadsword
     
  2. WIG19

    WIG19 Light left on

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    First off, bravo! for making shooting a family affair. :thumbsup:

    It's likely that you have enough of a proper grip & trigger control that it's tough for you to limpwrist it. However, what you describe sounds like classic absence of enough resistance to let the slide keep enough rearward inertia to do its job. Especially so coupled with the flight path of your son's brass. This is especially prevalent in 9mm's with standard plinking ammo; I'm not surprised at all that they didn't have a problem with the G22 which has the same stock recoil spring weight as a G17.

    One other consideration... Even with a firm & very locked up grip, locked elbows, facial grimace & all, if they are grabbing too much trigger (instead of having the gun firmly into the hand and pressing with the fingerpad only, drawing straight back) the gun can twist slightly out of its best line and, again, rearward inertia that should be absorbed by the shooter is taken up with slight rearward travel of the gun itself. If they're shooting 2-handed insure that the weak-side hand is well wrapped around the shooting hand and doing about 70% of the work, steadying the shooting hand which is only doing about 30% - and of course that little bit it takes for the solitary trigger-finger pad to press the trigger.

    Let us know how it goes; the fun is in the research!

    :patriot:
     

  3. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    Limpwristing, no doubt. They need to work on getting a grip that holds the gun steady, working againsst the recoil, and they need to get their body weight forward. Shooters with less upper body strength, especially, tend to lean back to counter the weight of the gun, which hurts their ability to manage recoil.
     
  4. WIG19

    WIG19 Light left on

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    Outstanding advice. Sometimes a simple step forward into any type of athletic position will fix this too. :thumbsup:

    :patriot: