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Mrs' L's Glock art

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by lethal tupperwa, Sep 22, 2006.

  1. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    She noticed that the berries growing next to the targets, while not eatable, were pretty.



    [​IMG]
     
  2. IMPALA SS

    IMPALA SS

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    thats good shooting--now try for flys as they land on the target. frank
     

  3. ede

    ede Bama's Friend

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    poke berrys? never tried but always heard you can eat them, but we did the leaves. use to play cowboys and the other non PC word for native americans and use them for war paint. funny thing is the poke berry juice doesn't really wash off.
     
  4. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    The coloring of wine with pokeweed berries has been discouraged because they are very poisonous.

    from
    Pokeweed: An Interesting American Vegetable


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Pokeweed Family (Phytolaccaceae): Pokeweed
    Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) is a robust perennial potherb native to the eastern United States. It belongs to the pokeweed family (Phytolaccaceae), a small family found mostly in Africa and the New World. In addition to pokeweed, it also includes several enormous South American trees and some unusual serpentine vines of the tropics. Poke is derived from the Algonquian Indian word "pakon" or "puccoon," referring to a dye plant used for staining. It is sometimes spelled polk and the leaves were reportedly worn by enthusiastic supporters during the campaign of James K. Polk, 11th president of the United States. The generic name Phytolacca is derived from the Greek word phyton (plant) and the French lac (lake--a dark red pigment), referring to the crimson juice of ripe berries. Pokeweed may grow to nine feet tall, with large, alternate leaves and a carrotlike taproot. It may become a very invasive weed in southern California gardens and is difficult to eradicate when it becomes well-established. Greenish-white flowers are produced in long clusters (racemes) that droop due to the weight of ripening fruit. The flattened berries change from green to shiny purplish-black. Ripe berries yield a crimson juice that was used as a substitute for red ink and to enhance the color of pale wines. The coloring of wine with pokeweed berries has been discouraged because they are very poisonous.

    Freshly cut young leaves and shoots may be cooked and eaten like spinach. They should be boiled twice, and the first water being discarded. In 1969, when astronaut Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a popular song on the radio was "Poke Salad Annie." The song depicted a poor southern girl who picked a wild plant called pokeweed for a vegetable. The greens are also called poke salet, and they are sometimes canned and sold in markets.
     
  5. ede

    ede Bama's Friend

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    i had a typo, i meant to say can't instead of can. my mind works faster than my fingers on here.
     
  6. WIG19

    WIG19 Light left on

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    I like the 60's look! :supergrin:

    She could've probably sold those up here at the Warrens Cranfest this past weekend. ;)
    (OTOH, nah, don't do that... my wife might've bought them...)
    :upeyes:

    :patriot: