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Mounting press

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by attrapereves, May 28, 2014.

  1. attrapereves

    attrapereves

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    I bought a new reloading bench and have a bit of a dilemma. The rear holes on my press will come in contact with the edge of the table (see picture). I don't think I'd want to drill all the way through the top and the edge.

    I thought about mounting the press with bolts to two double stacked 4x2s, then mounting those 4x2s to the table, into the top and away from the support at the edge.

    Any other recommendations?

    BTW, this table from Home Depot makes a really nice, sturdy work bench: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Unbranded-72-in-Fold-Out-Wood-Workbench-WKBNCH72X22/203083493

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Three-Five-Seven

    Three-Five-Seven Señor Mombo Millennium Member

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    Your instinct is the same as mine. Mount the press to something and mount that something to the bench. You have several choices about what to mount your press to.

    1. Your idea -- wood.

    2. 1/4" mild steel.

    3. One of the "Strong Mount" variations available at Inline design.

    4. The wooden press mount that Sinclair sells.
     

  3. attrapereves

    attrapereves

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    If I went with wood, how should I mount the press to the wood block so the bolts don't get in the way?

    I would just mount the wood block to the table using bolts, but in a way so they don't interfere with the edge.
     
  4. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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  5. uzimon

    uzimon team ftp

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    I used wood screws and forced them into the wood. Dont need bolts going all the way through and nuts on bottom
    Notched the wood to move the ram further in, to keep the screws away from the edge
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2014
  6. attrapereves

    attrapereves

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    Lee single stage cast press
     
  7. unclebob

    unclebob DFC, MSM, 13 Air Medals.

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    Also depends if you want the press at table top height or do you want it raised?
     
  8. attrapereves

    attrapereves

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    At table top height or maybe an 1" or 2" above would be ideal.
     
  9. unclebob

    unclebob DFC, MSM, 13 Air Medals.

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  10. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    Can't you just get a Stud type setup. One side is a lag bolt that goes into the wood, the other side is a stud that takes the nut. Get one about 2 inch's long on the wood side. Drill the hole to under the size of the solid part. It will fit in tight. You could even wood glue that end. Then you have a stud on the top for the nut and washer.

    I have the Pat Marlin setup. It's excellent.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2014
  11. dkf

    dkf

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    Predrill pilot holes to prevent splitting and install some lag screws. (1/4" or 5/16", what fits) There is plenty of area for the screw to bite into the end of the table.
     
  12. attrapereves

    attrapereves

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    This actually going to work out well. I found some 1/4" bolts at Menard's with flat phillips heads. I countersunk them to make it flat wood against wood. The next step is mounting this wood to the top of the bench.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  13. dkf

    dkf

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    Pick up three 1/4" vinyl bolt caps to cover the ends of the bolts. Prevents cuts and looks purty.
     
  14. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    That will flex more then just mounting it straight to the bench as it should be.
     
  15. Uncle Don

    Uncle Don Wood butcher

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    I opted for the strongmount approach. It spreads out the footprint, but yet is solid.

    In my case, I put my woodworking hobby to work and made this one. As you can see, the top is dovetailed for strength and the opening is utilized for the small box of accessories. It just sits in the opening and when I need it, just push it out the back through the mouse hole in the front. It's years old now, but that is still where it sits today.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. sig357fan

    sig357fan

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    I use a 1/2" steel plate that is drilled and tapped for the foot print of 3 different presses and a lubrisizer.

    rounded the front edge that the press sits on and used 5 countersunk screws to secure it to the bench right over the front/right leg.

    you could even hang the plate over the edge so the press clears the bolt at the corner.

    sig357fan

    P.S. looks like fiberboard for the top, you may want to add bracing under the top to run the screws/bolts into
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2014
  17. poodleplumber

    poodleplumber

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    Uncle Don, that is some nice work. My dad used to build furniture for a hobby. He is too feeble for the wood shop now, but he has a house full of handmade furniture, mostly walnut, that I am going to make sure stays in the family. That piece of yours is very well done, functional and handsome as well.
     
  18. Uncle Don

    Uncle Don Wood butcher

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    That's nice of you to say. I'm also glad to hear that your Dad's furniture is coveted by your family. That's one thing we woodworkers have to come to grips about - that the furniture we build has a higher chance someday of being in a second hand shop after the builder and wife are gone. It's good to see that isn't the case in your family.
     
  19. attrapereves

    attrapereves

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    Understood, but it's impossible to mount it to the bench without using lag screws. I'd prefer using bolts.

    I don't think my setup will flex any more than one of those mounting brackets.
     
  20. Colorado4Wheel

    Colorado4Wheel

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    Why the aversion to a lag bolt. Your taking two steps back and none forward.