Mountain Air Crash

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by flyandscuba, May 31, 2007.

  1. flyandscuba

    flyandscuba

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    Interesting email text and photos I received regarding the recent fatal crash at Mountain Air.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Here's what the ramp and runway normally look like:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

     
  2. F14Scott

    F14Scott Luggage CLM

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    I like doctors.
    I like pilots.

    I don't like doctor pilots.

    Disclaimer: Yes, I know some doctors who take their flying seriously, blah blah blah. What fun would stereotyping be if it were always right?
     

  3. New

    New Guest

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    Just another "rich" person who buys an airplane he can't fly, does not listen to the third instructor that is trying to get him current and proficient in his "new" airplane, third because he didn't like what the other two had to say about his GGAFA (Gods Gift to Aviation Flying Abilities), wayyyyy to many gadgets that make flying outside the cockpit impossible when you are 10 steps behind the plane, and the false sense of security that follows with the glass-n-gadgets, not to mention the parachute that is there so if the SHTF he/she will be saved:upeyes: .

    This kind of stuff just really pisses me. I see people like this just to much. Too much money and too much macho, not a good combination. All they do is end up giving GA a bad reputation, and end up killing or badly injuring a passenger, who in turn sues, and inevitably make all of our rates go up. The only good I see out of this, one of those plastic GA airplanes are out of the sky, if that is what he was trying to fly.

    My condolences to the victims.
     
  4. Sambolijah

    Sambolijah .

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    Accidents happen.
     
  5. New

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    Don't you mean "pilot error"
     
  6. czbillt

    czbillt

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    Kathleen Freeble's husband and another doctor from St. Petersburg also died Saturday when landing in N.C.
    By JONATHAN ABEL
    Published May 28, 2007

    She was an attorney, an aerobics instructor and a surrealist painter who could turn a garden into a swirl of color.

    But on Sunday, authorities announced that Kathleen Freeble, 59, was also the third victim of a plane crash that killed her husband and another St. Petersburg doctor in North Carolina.

    Freeble was flying with her husband, Dr. Charles "Chas" Freeble III, 59, and a friend of theirs, Dr. Freddy Camuzzi, 60, on their way to Camuzzi's golf vacation home in the mountains of North Carolina.

    Camuzzi's plane took off from Albert Whitted Airport on Saturday morning and made it to the remote Mountain Air Airport, 35 miles northeast of Asheville, N.C., by 11:15 a.m.

    But something went wrong when the plane tried to land. It bounced on the runway and turned into a speeding fireball, careening across the airstrip and damaging five other planes, according to the Yancey County Sheriff's Department. The three passengers on board died at the scene.

    National Transportation Safety Board investigators were going over the wreckage on Sunday, but did not return calls. The National Weather Service reported clear skies and good weather Saturday.

    Camuzzi and Charles Freeble, doctors at St. Petersburg General Hospital, were identified Saturday, but it wasn't until Sunday that Kathleen Freeble's name was added to the list of the dead.

    Her mother, Mary Campbell, said that Kathleen retired a few years ago after a career as a Department of Veterans Affairs attorney. She and her husband eloped 39 years ago when they were 20 years old. They had one daughter, Morgan Johnson, 27, who is a lawyer in Washington, D.C.

    Since retiring, Kathleen Freeble had poured her energies into painting and traveling. She and her husband were frequent travelers, flying on their own to Belize, swimming with sharks, whitewater rafting and touring Europe, Campbell said.

    But the most important thing to Freeble was helping her parents - and others - with their medical problems.

    "She was an angel, " said Campbell. "She was always over here taking care of us."

    Her aunt, Dodie O'Keefe, said that Kathleen and Charles Freeble were often of help to people in need.

    "She was an advocate for the veterans and he was an advocate for his patients, " O'Keefe said. "The sunshine has gone out of our lives losing both Chas and Kathy."

    Camuzzi's son did not return a message left on his phone.
     
  7. Sambolijah

    Sambolijah .

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    Sure. Call it whatever you like.


    Accidents happen. Don't be too quick to crucify him.
     
  8. k9medic

    k9medic

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    I did the math and the DA for the accident day was over 7000ft.

    Not sure of the performance figures, but he probably felt he needed the extra speed to keep the controls "alive"
     
  9. New

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    I do not mean to crucify the guy, but this is just plain poor ability in preflight planning and ability, that caused three fatalities. What more can you say? If he planned the flight out properly, and was current in the airplane, this disaster would have been prevented.
     
  10. Sambolijah

    Sambolijah .

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    Fixed, and "could" and "would" are two different meanings.

    Pre-flight planning does go a long way, but it will not prevent accidents from happening.
     
  11. New

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    YES IT CAN. No if's and's or but's, Pre-flight planning can prevent accidents. Good ADM CAN prevent accidents, Currency CAN prevent accidents. What do you think we as "flight instructors" do? WE train and prepare students and pilots to avoid accidents and incidents using ALL AVIALABLE INFORMATION. Not using all available information is breaking an FAR.

    You think if the guy did a landing performance, supposing the given DA is exceeding the aircraft's ability, that may have changed his mind about the approach?

    Pre-flight planning is one of the biggest parts to a safe and successful flight. I certainly do not make it a habit to jump into an airplane with no idea what or where I am going to go, or what the objective is, it is irresponsible for any pilot to do so.
     
  12. C150J

    C150J Crackberry

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    Guys -

    Does anyone know who took the pics? A family member of someone involved is looking for them. Please feel free to PM me with any information you may have.

    J.
    - 121 First Officer
     
  13. F14Scott

    F14Scott Luggage CLM

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    Just a guess, but you might try to e-mail:

    auxair0483 at photobucket.com (or yahoo, hotmail, or the other common ones)

    auxair0483 is the owner of the private photobucket album that hosts those pictures. I can't tell if FlyandScuba is affiliated or if he just posted the link.
     
  14. c6601a

    c6601a

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    I think he is just a poster. I saw those pictures linked a few hours after the accident to the Beechcraft mailing list along with a least one first hand account. I think it was from the owner of the V-tail closest to the fire. You will have to search the archives at http://lists.kjsl.com/pipermail/beech-owners/ to get the name. I saw the same pictures posted on several other aviation mailing lists over the next few days by different posters.
     
  15. geoffinak

    geoffinak Guest

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    I do not think anyone disagrees, least of all me with your view. However, an accident can still happen, no matter what your training, how current you are, how much planning you have done.
    If you don't believe that, then your missing the whole point to aviation safety in the first place. It's not if it will happen, it's when it will happen. Keep that thought and others may just live from what you teach.
    Geoff
     
  16. flyandscuba

    flyandscuba

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    C150J,

    PM sent with information.
     
  17. New

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    I agree, thats why I used the term CAN. I was simply responding to scuba on what he posted;

    "Fixed, and "could" and "would" are two different meaning Pre-flight planning does go a long way, but it will not prevent accidents from happening."

    Not to mention, the accident as well. This looks, to me, like a currency and familiarization with the airplane sort of accident that unfortunately led to three peoples fatality. Now getting back to my post about preflight planning and currency, if it was done, do you think that this could have been prevented? No currency, no preflight planning and not familiar with the airplane = bad ADM. Coming in hot to a high altitude airport and crashing is just ridiculous.

    You are taking a chance at whatever you do in life. Just like going to a range to shoot, you do run the risk of getting shot. But we, as safe shooters, do things to minimize that risk to an acceptable percentage. Same goes with aviation. You take risks, but you stay current and plan to minimize the percentage of risk. Call it risk management if you will. Sure things go wrong. I have had engine outs, in single and multi engine airplanes. But I was prepared. I didn't panic, my currency and familiarization took over.
     
  18. geoffinak

    geoffinak Guest

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    As mentioned before, kinda of crucifying, without the facts, there are many things that could have caused this accident. The most obvious is not always the reason. Would you have liked to stepped out of your engine failure and someone say you did not take a large enough fuel sample. Or you panicked and pulled the mixture. Because it's obvious that the mechanical reliability factor is better then the pilot error factors in perceived engine failures.

    It's a great tragedy for everyone, lets see where the facts go before we jump in and say pilot error. It's the first one that most neophytes go to, lets not fan the flames of ignorance until the facts, as determined by the NTSB, which itself can be a mule with blinders on at times, especially in G.A. cases. Not to mention the F.A.A does a lot of back door coverage on these things. Especially if it involves maintenance that they may have had a direct link to lately.

    I am not one to jump to conclusions too fast. A full analyzation is needed before a decision on what action to take is arrived at. Sometimes this takes seconds. In this case, time, at this point , does not put a pressing decision to be made. So while it's healthy to cover the what ifs, lets not put hard blame until it established that the probability was maybe a whole link of of things or a catastrophic failure of some part. To overlook the mechanical factors is to me a huge hole not examined.
    There are a thousand stories in the naked city and this one is yet to be told fully
    Geoff
     
  19. New

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    Looking at what has been said so far,

    "I believe it was a relatively new member at the club. He was a home owner, traveling with 2 friends. His wife did not fly with him. They may have been just flying in for the day. The owner was a physician and one of the passengers a physician as well.

    He landed hot and could not get the plane on the ground, forced it down with such force that he broke off the nose wheel pants. This may have been a hard landing instead but his momentum would suggest that he was way too fast. He then clipped the bank of the runway on the left side and attempted to go round."

    I may be jumping to conclusions, but in my experience in G.A., and not being a neophyte, if it walks like a duck, and it sounds like a duck...

    The part at the end, "attempted to go around," = pilot error,
    If that is in deed true. The mechanics and systems in airplanes these days have time and time again not been the cause in a G.A. accident. So, looking at the statistics, yeah, the guy messed up, and it is probably due to the lack of being familiar with the airplane seeing as through the plane is new as of 2006, it is a high performance, and has more glass than most 737's. But thats just my opinion.