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Most funny video sketch!

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by Glock20 10mm, Mar 20, 2010.

  1. Glock20 10mm

    Glock20 10mm Use Linux!

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  2. Glock20 10mm

    Glock20 10mm Use Linux!

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  3. TKM

    TKM Shiny Member Lifetime Member

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    Last edited: Jul 24, 2010
  4. AnimalK

    AnimalK Kilted Muppet

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    Just helpful FYI...

    Epitaph = Phrase on a tombstone.
    "Here lies Bill,
    Whose life was full.
    Until he tried
    To milk a bull."

    Epithet = A descriptive term (word or phrase) accompanying, or occurring in place of, a name, and having entered common usage.


    FROM WIKIPEDIA:
    "In linguistics, an epithet can only be a metaphor, essentially a reduced or condensed appositive. Epithets are sometimes attached to a person's name or appear in place of their name, as what might be described as a glorified nickname. An epithet is linked to its noun by long-established usage and some are not otherwise employed. Not every adjective is an epithet, even worn clichés: an epithet is especially recognizable when its function is largely decorative, as when "cloud-gathering Zeus" is otherwise employed than in conjuring up a storm. "The epithets are decorative insofar as they are neither essential to the immediate context nor modelled especially for it. Among other things, they are extremely helpful to fill out a half-verse", Walter Burkert has noted.[2]
    Some epithets are known by the Latin term epitheton necessarium because they are required to distinguish the bearers, e.g. as an alternative to ordinals after a prince's name — such as Richard the Lionheart, or Charles the Fat alongside Charles the Bald. Still the same epithet can be used repeatedly, in different spheres of life and/or joined to different names, say Alexander the Great as well as Catherine the Great.
    Other epithets can easily be omitted without serious risk of confusion, and are therefore known (again in Latin) as epitheton ornans; thus the classical Roman author Virgil systematically called his main hero pius Aeneas, the epithet being pius, which means religiously observant, humble and wholesome, as well as calling the armsbearer of Aeneas fidus Achates, the epithet being fidus, which means faithful or loyal.
    There are also specific types of epithets, such as the kenning which appears in works such as Beowulf. An example of a kenning would be the term whale-road, meaning "sea".


    In contemporary usage, epithet is sometimes used to refer to an abusive or defamatory phrase, such as a racial epithet. This euphemistic use is discredited by Martin Manser and other prescriptive linguists.[7]"
     
  5. Glock20 10mm

    Glock20 10mm Use Linux!

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    DOH! Thanks, I actually do know better... just need to not post when in a rush!:wavey:
     
  6. Free Radical

    Free Radical Miembro Antiguo CLM

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    Excellent job. Next, could you address the frequent misuse of the word paranoid here? I can never work up the courage to do it. :supergrin: