More newbie bike questions

Discussion in 'Moto Club' started by shamster, Jun 1, 2005.

  1. shamster

    shamster 1911 Shooter Millennium Member

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    I have never been on a motorcycle before but it's something I always wanted to get into. I plan to take the MSF basic course soon to get started.
    In the meantime, I'm looking for a good starter bike. I've read the various debates about getting a small bike vs. getting one you won't grow out of soon. I think if I can find a decent starter under $2000 (preferably closer to $1000 if possible) with good resale value, I don't mind learning on that. I would rather just learn correctly and safely and put up with the hassle of selling a bike in a few months than to get in over my head with a powerful bike.

    The thing is, I have no idea what bike would be good. I always wanted a crotch rocket, but the older I get, the more I am starting to like Harleys. So I'm not sure if I should start with a small standard, or get a small crotch rocket.

    Anyhow, I'm open to suggestions as to what bikes to be on the lookout for. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    The older you get, the rougher it gets trying to mount and crouch on a crotch rocket.

    A nice, small standard would be a great starter bike. Something like the Honda Nighthawk. It'd to be dirt cheap. Or something like the Honda Rebel which is a cheap cruiser that doesn't sit too low and the feet aren't too far forward. Or a Suzuki GZ250 small cruiser. Or a Kawasaki Eliminator 125 small cruiser.

    These bikes are all very cheap brand new and should be dirt cheap used.

    Think light and think comfort when you first learn how to ride.

    And so what if you'll grow out of it soon? Then it's time to get a new one. I can't say it enough, motorcycling isn't a forgiving activity like car driving. You screw up, you get hurt real bad. You get hurt and not the Joe Cool that tells you the Gixxer seven fiddy is da bomb! Or the 700-lbs Harley is IT.
     

  3. shamster

    shamster 1911 Shooter Millennium Member

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    Thanks for the suggestions. One question...after starting out with any of those bikes and getting comfortable with them, is it a pretty easy transition to a 600cc crotch rocket?
     
  4. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    After you get the basic techniques down and the feel for two wheeling, you can ride anything. But in the mean time, you have to deal with the way a bike operates. You gotta work both hands and feet, arms and legs all together in harmony in order to master slow speed maneuvering and stop 'n go. You gotta learn how to use your body's position to help a bike's handling and maneuvering. You gotta learn to depend more on your visual acuity for awareness because the wind noise and car noise and engine noise will pretty much drown out your hearing. You gotta learn how to look forward, backward, sideway while going through a turn without fixating on things and crash. You gotta learn how to cope with wind on your body (it feels like you're going to fly off the bike until you get used to it). You gotta learn how to cope with bumps on the road (it feels like a bronco is about to buck you off the bike). A road that is soooo smooooooth in your car may be a jittery ride on your bike.
    You gotta learn how to ride in heavy traffic, how to cope with being surrounded by vehicles that can crush you in an instance. You gotta learn how to be able to exploit the traffic to your safety and advantage.

    It's that much harder learning all these things while riding a bike that is either too heavy or too powerful.

    When I was in my late teens and early twenties, I was a cool cat. You can't tell me anything about motorcycling. I knew it all. Only by luck that I couldn't financially afford a crotch rocket, or else I may have bit the dust. My bike then was a humble Kawasaki EX500 and it was a very forgiving bike. The current model is pretty much the same thing.