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More GSSF TIPS #3-35

Discussion in 'GSSF' started by BCarver, Apr 12, 2003.

  1. BCarver

    BCarver CLM Millennium Member

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    The host of this week's topic will be Tony Clemens.

    Topic #3: Where do you focus your eyes when shooting the plates using

    When shooting plates using iron sights, my focus is on the front sight. A clear focus on the front sight results in a slightly blurry target and rear sight, but when trying to precisely align three items, focusing on the middle one results in the best compromise. Some say they are able to change their focus from target to front sight to rear sight, but that takes too much time.

    Maintaining a clear focus on the front sight during
    a run (whether on steel or paper) is very difficult, since it's a
    natural tendency to want to watch the targets fall. Well, when I start watching the plates, they stop falling! My most consistent, quickest runs with iron sights come when I remember a distinct, clear focus on the front sight for EACH shot.

    When you see someone hit the first 4 or 5 plates in quick succession, then miss the last 1 or 2, their focus has
    shifted from their front sight to the plates. Practice resisting the
    temptation to shift focus during a run. Practice seeing a clear, precise sight picture on each plate (or D1 or popper).

    Refer to Bobby's 1st post concerning practice habits. Sight in your gun so you have confidence in knowing the shot will go exactly where the sights are aligned. Refer to Dale's 2nd post. I use a piece of "scotch tape" on the left lens of my glasses when shooting with iron sights. This gives me one clear sight picture, and can help people with opposite eye dominance problems.

    Another tip I can give is somewhat hard to explain, but it works for me. Before the buzzer goes, I cross my eyes slightly so when I raise the gun to my line of sight, I have a clear focus on the front sight. I don't have to wait for my eye focus to switch from the target to the front sight, resulting in a quicker first shot. To help determine how much you need to intentionally cross your eyes, raise your EMPTY gun and aim at a target. Focus on your front sight, then slowly lower your gun while noticing how much your target is blurred. Practice this until you know how much to blur your target so that when your gun is raised, the front sight is in clear focus IMMEDIATELY.

    Speed comes from decreasing the time from buzzer to first shot and the time between subsequent shots. Don't "try" to shoot fast. Speed will come with practice. Shoot smooth.

    Bottom line - regardless of whether you're shooting plates or paper, let your sights dictate your shooting pace. Don't break the shot until your sights are aligned sufficiently for the shot required.
     
  2. DannyR

    DannyR Moderator Millennium Member

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    Thanks Bobby and Tony. I figured out a "bank shot" method of adding this update to the master thread without losing it here by itself.
     

  3. jay.shebuski

    jay.shebuski

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    ..I will certainly take that pre-buzzer "eye focus" point and use it.

    Thanks,

    Jay
     
  4. FotoTomas

    FotoTomas Pure Polymer

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    It is worth a shot if "cross-eyes" will work. I will give it a try.