Glock Forum - GlockTalk banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
A swamp dude
Joined
·
11,272 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Much has been written on this forum and others about the need for advanced training in SD with a handgun. A record setting debate with more than 1,000 posts is still alive on Glock Talk on the issue of carrying in condition C1 vs C3. So many opinions and arguments are offered for different levels of proficiency, it is difficult to conclude what skill/knowledge level should be attained as a minimum for safe, effective CC.

Where I live there is no test required to obtain a CC permit. If a person's record is clean, the issuance of a license is assured. That's the way things are supposed to work under our Constitution. The fundamental question is, don't we have a moral obligation to achieve some minimum level of proficiency to carry a loaded firearm among our fellow citizens? If we act carelessly or foolishly with our gun and someone is harmed, we clearly are accountable under the law.

After digesting lots of information about safety and competency with handguns, I'm starting to have serious reservations about my own abilities. While I've taken the basic NRA course and a few others, I have been comfortable relying on situational awareness to avoid needing to use force for SD. I go to the range often to keep in touch with my carry gun, but I'm not involved in advanced training or competitive shooting. Knowing that the level of stress in an armed confrontation is mind numbing to the point that we may lose control of behavior, how does one know if his/her preparation is adequate? Might we be a threat to innocents in the area if we unleash uncontrolled fire out of panic?

What is the minimum standard for handgun proficiency that we, as responsible citizens, should hold ourselves to before walking out of the door armed? What level of skill/knowledge/experience is appropriate to be safe, law abiding
citizens?
 

·
KoolAidAntidote
Joined
·
5,908 Posts
We all have to be honest with ourselves about our own capabilities and tendencies, bro. The kind of person who panics in other emergencies might indeed panic in this one. The kind of person who handles other crises well, will probably handle the armed crisis well also, so long as they know what to do.

Like any other martial art, the defensive handgun can be a life study. None of us ever get as good as we truly want to get.

The armed citizen confrontation tends to have a different pattern of encounter than your typical police shooting. Range tends to be closer, and circumstances are often much more clear than they are to a responding officer who arrives as a third party once an incident is underway.

If a jurisdiction was to demand a qualification shoot for armed citizens, I would suggest it be very close-range and simple: something an elderly, arthritic woman with a cheap gate-loading revolver can pass, because she's among those most likely to need it to defend herself.

best,
Mas
 

·
A swamp dude
Joined
·
11,272 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
We all have to be honest with ourselves about our own capabilities and tendencies, bro. The kind of person who panics in other emergencies might indeed panic in this one. The kind of person who handles other crises well, will probably handle the armed crisis well also, so long as they know what to do.

Like any other martial art, the defensive handgun can be a life study. None of us ever get as good as we truly want to get.

The armed citizen confrontation tends to have a different pattern of encounter than your typical police shooting. Range tends to be closer, and circumstances are often much more clear than they are to a responding officer who arrives as a third party once an incident is underway.

If a jurisdiction was to demand a qualification shoot for armed citizens, I would suggest it be very close-range and simple: something an elderly, arthritic woman with a cheap gate-loading revolver can pass, because she's among those most likely to need it to defend herself.

best,
Mas
Mas-

Many, perhaps most, of us go through life without a crisis that might serve as a test for how we'll hold together in a gun fight. Folks with naturally risky occupations (firefighters, high-up construction workers, etc.) may be the exception. I guess most of us just won't know till we get there. This uncertainty is the basis for my greatest fear about a gun fight. When I read about seasoned LEOs and military folks emptying their bowels and their mags in mind numbing fear, the chances of me remaining lucid seem pretty slim.

Your advice about a "qualification shoot" seems reasonable to me as a basic preparation approach and is consistent with how I 'practice' during regular visits to the range. When I carry I typically have a Glock 19 in C3, which isn't conducive to responding to up close surprise attacks; thus, the value of CC remains questionable for me unless and until my skills and comfort level move up on the scale several notches.

Thanks for taking time to respond. As always, your thoughts are very well respected.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top