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Mechanical Engineering question

Discussion in 'The Okie Corral' started by bryan cc tx, Mar 7, 2012.

  1. bryan cc tx

    bryan cc tx

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    I have a Bachelors in Business Finance, and I am planning on going back to school to earn a Mechanical Engineering degree.

    Which is most looked for by employers and what type of work difference is there between Mechanical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering Technology?
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2012
  2. JoeInKS

    JoeInKS

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    Can't quite say I've heard of Mechanical Engineering Technology.... I have a degree in Mechanical Engineering though. In terms of what I think employers are looking for, I can tell you that they are looking for people who are capable and willing to learn, have shown an aptitude for integrating a variety of different things, and can get along / fit in with their work force. I graduated with that degree and have since done everything other than mechanical work. Mostly robotics, process controls, etc.

    It's a very nice field for picking up a variety of skills and for me was a perfect escape from the focused study of some of the other disciplines. You do tend to learn a little about chemical, thermo, physics, electrical, computers, etc.

    My advice, and you know what a person's advice is worth versus you're own, is to try to learn what you can, get a well rounded background, remain humble, and above all, always display and want to continue to learn.

    Good luck in your endeavors. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions.
     

  3. trcubed

    trcubed Senior Member

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    You'll need to ask the specific school about accreditation, but usually the tech programs don't include the higher math and calc-based physics, statics, dynamics courses that most state registration boards (and state engineering laws) require for you to get a license. To be licensed, you'll need an ABET-accredited degree.

    The good tech degrees are 4 year programs and are great for hands-on design work, but only if you have no need for an engineering registration. Some states, (Indiana, Pennsylvania, for example) used to allow tech grads to sit for the Fundamentals exam, then the Professional Engineer exam, but I don't know if that's still the case.

    Which school are you considering?
     
  4. bryan cc tx

    bryan cc tx

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    Thanks for your replys.

    I am constrained to my college choices due to a wife, kids, mortgage, and work.

    The local college, Texas A&M- Corpus Christi, is where I got my Finance Degree and where I will be pursuing my Engineering Degree.

    TAMCC just got accredited a year or so ago in Mechanical Engineering, so I think this is like the 2-3 class.

    I saw the courses Cal1,2,3. I took Cal1,2 in a Finance degree plan. How much harder will Cal be in an Engineering degree plan...or basic principles apply just different application a severity?
     
  5. IlliniGlocker

    IlliniGlocker

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    Engineering Technology majors are not real engineers.

    Then again with a BS in Mech your life will consist of designing brackets all day. Just a fore warning.
     
  6. IlliniGlocker

    IlliniGlocker

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    Calc 1 and 2 are a joke compared to calc 3, diff eq, and statics/dynamics. If you didn't easily ace calc 1 and 2, you're in trouble.
     
  7. bryan cc tx

    bryan cc tx

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    With a Mech Eng Degree I'll be designing brackets.

    With a Mech Eng Tech Degree I'll be doing what? being an Engineers Beetch?
     
  8. IlliniGlocker

    IlliniGlocker

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    With any engineering degree you'll be working for a business major who barely got out of school, but who's dad knows the owner of the company. Your life will consist of having to answer to people less educated, but much better paid than you. These people will have no idea how to clearly articulate technical requirements to you, and will be confused as to why your design doesn't look exactly like they pictured it in their wee little heads.

    Sorry, you asked this question after a long work day.
     
  9. bryan cc tx

    bryan cc tx

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    Good description. Thanks for the info no need to apologize. I come with Rhino skin.

    We have a bit of an oil boom in S. Texas so I will probably look at going into the oil field. Anybody have any experience in Engineering as it relates to the Petroleum industry?
     
  10. IlliniGlocker

    IlliniGlocker

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    If your school has petroleum engineering, go for it! Very lucrative from what I've seen. The only downside is that I've seen Mechs working in just about every industry, but with petroleum you're tying yourself to a bit of a niche. Mechs do alot of stress/strain analysis from what I've seen, and have a few open doors in the firearms design field. Heck, I just saw a posting for a MechEng on Savage's website!
     
  11. arclight610

    arclight610

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    I scanned this little flyer thing I had from my school's engineering department for you.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2012
  12. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    The former is a real engineering degree, the latter is not a real engineering degree. Employers that look to hire engineers are not going to hire technologists.
     
  13. mymini40

    mymini40

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    Go for BS in Mech Engg. Thats what I feel.
     
  14. fnfalman

    fnfalman Chicks Dig It

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    Yep.

    I took business Calc 1 & 2, then I took engineering/science Calc 1 & 2. Totally different animals. The engineering/science Calc classes are much more demanding than the business Calc classes.
     
  15. arclight610

    arclight610

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    Engineers work more with theory whereas technologists work with proven practices and materials. They usually both work in teams together, because oftentimes engineers have great ideas but don't know how to actually put them in practice. Technologists make ideas into reality. If you like hands on, technology is for you.

    One is not necessarily better than the other, they are just different areas in the same field. There is a certification path for technologists that is separate from engineers, but some states also recognize technologists as engineers. Sometimes, technologists will also be put into the role of an engineer.

    EDIT: Sometimes I envy the technologists, because while I'm sitting there learning irrelevant bullcrap, they're out there playing with robots and stuff. Also, internships for full-fledge engineers have been scarce lately. However, there are a ton of technologist internships available.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2012
  16. bryan cc tx

    bryan cc tx

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    Thanks for the graphic, I really appreciate it.

    Petro Engi was my first choice, but I've learned by picking a Finance Degree the first time I do not want to be in a niche degree. Made the decision for Mech Engi because of its broad application.

    If anyone else would like to tell me the day-to-day real-world Mech Engi work or Mech Tech work feel free to drop a line. If anyone has the same for a Mech Engi in the Oil industry also please chime in.
     
  17. Crazy KD

    Crazy KD

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    Technology degrees get hourly roles at my company. I honestly don't know what their yearly income is as we don't have any at my location. A new hire with a ME degree gets in the $50s I think.

    One word of caution as I did my undergraduate in ME then a graduate degree in business. I had to bust my rear end to get through engineering school and it was a cake walk to get my business degree. All it took was putting in the time. I'm not saying you can't do it just wanting you to have realistic expectations.

    With that said a good ME can do just about anything within a company. I'll go out on a limb, but a ME is the most well rounded of the engineering degrees.
     
  18. arclight610

    arclight610

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    Yes. If you decide to pursue a degree in MechE, there will be plenty of gnashing of teeth.
     
  19. .264 magnum

    .264 magnum CLM

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    You can catch on with an energy company with a mechanical engineering degree.
     
  20. Crazy KD

    Crazy KD

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    What do ME's at my company do? Design electronics, mechanical design work, manufacturing engineering (work on our production lines), technical service, technical sales, application engineering (applying our products in the field), field test work, test development, etc I even think the head guy is a ME.