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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I inherited my Dad’s carbine when he passed away in 2003. I recall cleaning it and putting a few rounds through it, then cleaning and storing it.

I haven’t touched it since until this evening. I remember the thing was gunked up pretty bad. I bought a bolt removal tool, got out the manuals, the Hoppes #9, the break free, watched the YouTube videos and finally gave it a thorough cleaning.

Wow! What a mess! The smell of Hoppes is kerosene and it reminded me of my ROTC days. Got it cleaned, lubricated and reassembled. I’m glad I didn’t destroy the bolt or the tool in the process.

Well - it was an interesting way to spend a Sunday evening. Just thought I’d share. theres something satisfying about cleaning a gun and doing a good job….I’m sure you know what I mean.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Very cool! You should shoot it! I picked up a very good condition Winchester awhile back when Midway got some.
Thanks! I ordered 250 rounds of ammo for use with it that should arrive this week. Back in ‘03, I recall being overly worried about damaging it. I should’ve busted out the Hoppes and degreased and de-gunked it back then. Instead, I just did the best I could with a nylon brush, some patches and Break Free. It seems that was ok as it isn’t rusted at all.

I gotta be honest - after all that, I‘m hesitant to get it dirty again but next time won’t be as bad. I’m also itching to fire some live rounds with it!!!

I‘ll send updates as this is a nostalgic WWII manual-reading, weapon maintenance adventure! I feel like a new Army recruit!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I am continuing my investigation of my Dad’s carbine. As far as I can tell, it’s a New Jersey made “Plainfield Machine” P 30 G model with a shiny epoxy finish. I was born in New Jersey in ‘64 and we moved out of state in 1968 so I think Dad bought it in ‘66 or ‘67.

I’ve been reading the “M1 Carbine Owner’s Guide” and there is a discussion about chrome lined barrels and parts of the chamber having to be ground away. I’m not sure but I suspect I have one of those barrels. Somebody did some grinding on that gun!

I think Dad bought this used. It has been fired before but I don’t think it was by him. Check out the worn paint and ground down parts in the photo. It looks like somebody took a Dremel tool to the chamber!

He was a WWII navy vet. I asked him once what Navy boot camp was like in WWII and he said it was nothing - maybe two weeks of orientation then he got shipped out to the pacific. I’m not sure he carried a firearm on his ship during WWII. I wish I’d asked him about some of this stuff.

He was not as knowledgeable about firearms as some of us in this forum are which is why I don’t think he put many (if any) rounds through it. I’m pretty sure he got it used.

So, I think I have in my possession a 1960s chrome lined barrel, epoxy finish stock Plainfield 30 G model carbine reproduction. I’m 100% ok with that and intend to test fire it, zero in the sights, and ready it for home defense soon.

According to everything I’ve read, dry firing a Carbine isn’t bad for it and is part of the same function check procedure from the manual that we do on our Glocks after reassembly.

According to the book below, using a cleaning rod that isn’t one piece can scratch the delicate bore where the pieces screw together. I’d never heard that before but have instinctively tried to avoid any metal scraping when cleaning the bore of any gun.

When I get the ammo, I’ll see about getting to the range and zeroing this weapon.

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Very nice. You have piqued my interest in owning one. My father, a WWII paratrooper, explained how how he dumped his Thompson for one in Italy.
That might have something to do with the carbine having half the weight and twice the range.
 

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Friends Call Me "Flash"
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
With care, a sectioned cleaning rod is fine. That is about all the military ever used for 100+ years.
for future reference you pretty much never have to disassemble the bolt for routine maintenance
I agree with both points. The authors of the book seem pretty serious about the subject matter. Unless you are unbelievably careless, I don’t think the bore is likely to be damaged
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The bolt and inner workings of my carbine (Extractor, spring, firing pin, ejector, etc.) all had black crud caked on them. Everything is clean now.
Yeah…..I don’t plan on getting the bolt disassembly tool out and disassembling it again.

I was pushing my luck disassembling that bolt!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
There's a special tool for removing the gas piston nut. It's easy to mess up that nut without the tool. I recommend it.


Flash
Thanks, Flash! I don’t intend to fool with that at all.

I exceeded my skill level already. It’s a wonder I didn’t break or lose the little parts from the bolt assembly.

Only a trip to the range for test firing and zeroing will tell for sure, but I think I’ve maintained it the best I can.

All that remains is to maybe fill in some of the dents with wood putty and touch up the finish with one of those wood finish paint pens. Maybe install ammo pouches on the stock.

Just waiting for ammo to come in….that weapon needs test firing!!!
 

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I agree with both points. The authors of the book seem pretty serious about the subject matter. Unless you are unbelievably careless, I don’t think the bore is likely to be damaged View attachment 1083008

The bolt and inner workings of my carbine (Extractor, spring, firing pin, ejector, etc.) all had black crud caked on them. Everything is clean now.
Yeah…..I don’t plan on getting the bolt disassembly tool out and disassembling it again.

I was pushing my luck disassembling that bolt!
.30cal bore snake. That's all I use in my carbines.
 

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When I was a kid, M1 Carbines were for sale in every discount store. Plainfield or Universal, they all had them, even Sears. And I wanted one. My Dad was a WWII vet, and knew all about them. He had an encyclopedic knowledge of that eras weapons.
When I turned 18, I bought a Plainfield at a gun show.
Looking it over at the time, it was 90% M2, missing only the trip lever/switch to complete it. That’s how it was made.
It was a great shooting Carbine, but I just had to have a Mini14, and sold the Plainfield to help finance one. Big mistake. Regretted it the first time I shot the Mini, and it’s group at 50yds was bigger than the Carbine did at 100yds.
Today, my Carbine needs are filled by an Auto Ordnance I tried out and found reliable and accurate.
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
When I was a kid, M1 Carbines were for sale in every discount store. Plainfield or Universal, they all had them, even Sears. And I wanted one. My Dad was a WWII vet, and knew all about them. He had an encyclopedic knowledge of that eras weapons.
When I turned 18, I bought a Plainfield at a gun show.
Looking it over at the time, it was 90% M2, missing only the trip lever/switch to complete it. That’s how it was made.
It was a great shooting Carbine, but I just had to have a Mini14, and sold the Plainfield to help finance one. Big mistake. Regretted it the first time I shot the Mini, and it’s group at 50yds was bigger than the Carbine did at 100yds.
Today, my Carbine needs are filled by an Auto Ordnance I tried out and found reliable and accurate. View attachment 1083016
That is some good info! I must might be placing an order for the Auto Ordinance paratrooper model carbine in the near future!!!

Owning a “new” carbine would be pretty outstanding!!!!!
 

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Love the flat bolt on your rifle. I had my fingers crossed for a flat bolt when I ordered my M1 Carbine from the CMP . Yep, no luck with that.
 
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