Glock Talk banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m looking for thoughts/suggestions on replicating a similar load to the federal 9mm 150gr TSJ ammo. I’m thinking a coated 147gr round nose since they’re readily available and should give the best reliability in my Glock Gen 5 barrels with short throat. But open to any thoughts or suggestions.


Sent from my iPhone using Glock Talk mobile app
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,000 Posts
Does your gen 5 have the front cocking serrations? I belive the ones with have a longer throat.
Mine is a very early gen 5 I havent used many 147gr with it. I have though used some 130gr coated bullets with sport pistol powder with good results through it.
Iam sure you can find a 147gr profile to work also.
On second thought I have used acme 147gr round nose through mine.
 

· On the Border
Joined
·
16,903 Posts
If you don't have a rule constraint and just want to minimize flip, I'd say drop the bullet weight and stick with a moderately fast powder. That will also probably play well into your throat constraint.

Think light SCSA ammo, as opposed to minor. You'll get better overall performance if minimum power is the main goal.
 

· Venor ergo sum
"94% of mass shootings occur in gun free zones" CPRC
Joined
·
6,539 Posts
I’ve used 147 coated cast flat points from Acme, Blue Bullets, and Chey-cast with a lighter charge of Accurate #7. They replicate the 150 Syntech Action Pistol load very well and accuracy is real good. I think the Blues are the most accurate for me.


I’m looking for thoughts/suggestions on replicating a similar load to the federal 9mm 150gr TSJ ammo. I’m thinking a coated 147gr round nose since they’re readily available and should give the best reliability in my Glock Gen 5 barrels with short throat. But open to any thoughts or suggestions.


Sent from my iPhone using Glock Talk mobile app
 

· Registered
Joined
·
40,449 Posts
Best bet for light loads is hvy bullets going slow with the least amount of powder possible. That means very fast powders. This gives the slide momentum to cycle reliably. A stock G17 can run around 120 PF or [email protected] There are 160-165gr RN bullets in 9mm for very sift shooting, but I dont like them in a pistol with heavy slide, very slow slide speed.
 

· On the Border
Joined
·
16,903 Posts
Best bet for light loads is hvy bullets going slow with the least amount of powder possible. That means very fast powders. This gives the slide momentum to cycle reliably. A stock G17 can run around 120 PF or [email protected] There are 160-165gr RN bullets in 9mm for very sift shooting, but I dont like them in a pistol with heavy slide, very slow slide speed.
I agree that's true if you need to make minor and drop steel. If not constrained by that, I think a lighter bullet is softer and also a better overall performer.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
40,449 Posts
I agree that's true if you need to make minor and drop steel. If not constrained by that, I think a lighter bullet is softer and also a better overall performer.
Issue is in many guns the lighter bullet wont cycle the slide without recoil spring reduction, which often comes with reliability issues. So to get good slide speed, a heavier bullet does that at lower vel with the bonus of less blast. The 165 @ 775fps could almost be shot without earpro, almost.
 

· On the Border
Joined
·
16,903 Posts
Issue is in many guns the lighter bullet wont cycle the slide without recoil spring reduction, which often comes with reliability issues. So to get good slide speed, a heavier bullet does that at lower vel with the bonus of less blast. The 165 @ 775fps could almost be shot without earpro, almost.
My experience with Glocks is all gen3, which I think is the best choice for aftermarket support and tuning. I moved from Glock to Tanfo for Production in 2016.

I've never met anyone who knows what they're doing that's shooting Glocks in minor with anywhere near an OE recoil spring, so that's a non-issue. Sevigny was cutting coils off #11 springs back in the day. #12-14 is the normal range. I've always used #12's in my 34's, and I go down to #10 for steel ammo in the 34's. I use #9 springs for all ammo in my Tanfo's.

Driving factor for recoil spring weights is how sights return. If that part is right, function should not be a big deal. Of course Tanfo's are vastly superior to Glocks in terms of slide/gun mass, but that's another topic. Glocks also don't have barrel/slide lugs to lock up, so no concern there. I had some problems with #8 springs in Tanfo's in that regard.

Slide cuts weren't legal in the old Production rules, but they are now. So you're going to add forward serrations, and presumably take a little more mass out while you're at it. That helps handling and stability, but springs are probably going to be the same as before.

My Production load is normally a 147 or 150gr coated or plated RN bullet with ~3.25gr of WST or 320 at 1.135. My steel load is typically a 115gr coated RN bullet with 3.40-3.60gr of WST or 320 at 1.100. That's more like 110PF, and all my guns run it 100%.

Because I changed Production platforms before the rules changed, I never got into lightening slides on my 34's. I carry 19.3's. Slides on those guns are ~10% below OE mass. They run everything from +P HST down to 110PF steel ammo 100% on #14 springs.

As a side project, I built a 17.3 last year. Wanted to see how it would compare in terms of balance and overall performance to my Stock 2's. I have a bunch of G17 slides that are reduced 5-10% from OE mass. The 17.3 performs similarly to my 19.3's with a #10 spring.

For SCSA and hanging steel in general, I like a bit more velocity in a super-light round. Without going into a lot of detail, this is what I was basing my suggestions on above.

So bottom line, there's lots of misinformation out there. Do your homework, do what you need to do to make your stuff run 100%, and get after it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
40,449 Posts
I can get down yo about 115pf on a stock g26 or g19 with stock springs. I tried lighter springs but get ftf at times, especially with strong or weak hand only. So stock springs & 115pf is my floor.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Skippy,
my load that closest matches your requirement uses BBI 147 flat points over 3.x grains of WST. To get them to consistently plunk in my latest G19.5MOS I load no longer than 1.09". If it were round nose the length would be longer. Chrono'd some the other day in the cold at 890 fps. These function 100% in every 9mm I've tried them in and are my general purpose, low cost, clean 9 load.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,675 Posts
Issue is in many guns the lighter bullet wont cycle the slide without recoil spring reduction, which often comes with reliability issues. So to get good slide speed, a heavier bullet does that at lower vel with the bonus of less blast. The 165 @ 775fps could almost be shot without earpro, almost.
2.9 N320 with an Xtreme 165 shoots pretty flat in my G45 MOS. Went with a lighter Glockstore recoil spring and it runs like a watch and doesn’t take 2 men and a small boy to jack the slide back. I think Glock builds their guns to run +P+, so a lighter spring works better for me.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
40,449 Posts
Skippy,
my load that closest matches your requirement uses BBI 147 flat points over 3.x grains of WST. To get them to consistently plunk in my latest G19.5MOS I load no longer than 1.09". If it were round nose the length would be longer. Chrono'd some the other day in the cold at 890 fps. These function 100% in every 9mm I've tried them in and are my general purpose, low cost, clean 9 load.
Maybe the shorter oal, but i run a 147rn over 3.15gr of wst at 1.135”, 875 in a g19/3. I can get down to 3gr, about 810fps, but I dont feel it is 100% reliable in my hands.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SkippyKustoms
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top