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Rational
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Discussion Starter #1
Some pretty wild stuff.


Can any ship-knowledgable people here tell us what it is that they are cranking by hand? It looks like a brake of some sort....?

And how do ship anchors work? I always assumed that they sat on the bottom of the sea-bed to effectively "mount" the ship in place.

Here's another one. Far more spectacular.


This one seems to have stopped at the end:


Apparently, a 1st Lt was trying to show off but almost managed to lose the entire thing. According to the description:


Taken in 2008 aboard the USS George Washington.

I imagine that was worth an ass-chewing or two.
 

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The hand crank is for a friction brake on the chain wildcat. The name is self explanatory if you watch the video. Dangerous stuff.

Anchors work by digging into the sea bed, but having a long length of chain out does most of the work- usually 5-7 times the water depth, more if weather or bottom composition are poor. That is called "scope." The chain and anchor hold the ship in a general location, but allow it to swing in a circle as tide and wind change.
 
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Rational
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Discussion Starter #3
The hand crank is for a friction brake on the chain wildcat. The name is self explanatory if you watch the video. Dangerous stuff.

Anchors work by digging into the sea bed, but having a long length of chain out does most of the work- usually 5-7 times the water depth, more if weather or bottom composition are poor. That is called "scope." The chain and anchor hold the ship in a general location, but allow it to swing in a circle as tide and wind change.
Thanks for that! Indeed, I've learned something today.

ETA: So when the anchor is lost, does that mean the brake fails, or is the seabed deeper than the length of the chain?
 

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You're most welcome.
 

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So with no nautical background, it appears to me that after a certain length of chain, the friction brake overheats, catches fire, and fails ! :wow:
I assume a hydraulic motor hauls the chain up, why can't it be throttled to do the work of retarding it going out. The friction brake can then be redundant clamp up.
 
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Many years of boating taught me that Ship Happens whenever you pull out of dock.
 

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I can't imagine the sound of that in a steel room.

Like listening for problems in a Vulcan gun with a stethoscope.
 
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Thought so.'08.
 

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:tequila:
 
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Youse bogged yerself into this,not I.'08.
 
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On a much smaller scale ... I hate it when my anchor gets fouled. I cannot holdmy breath as long as I could when I was a kid ... had to start carrying spare air on the boat.

 
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