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Looking to get a new Sleeping Bag!

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by KodiakG-22C, May 14, 2007.

  1. KodiakG-22C

    KodiakG-22C

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    I'm looking to get a new sleeping bag. Something for camping in summer and maybe into the late fall. "In Michigan"
    I dont think I would be interested in a Mummy type of bag. Just your regular kind!

    What do I look for in a quality bag? Is it the Temp Rating? How heavey they are? What they are made of?

    Any help would be great.


    THANKS!

    Kodiak
     
  2. UTKEngineer

    UTKEngineer

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    Depends on what you mean by "camping."

    Most of my backwoods experience is from backpacking, so I pay a premium for light bags. I've got a Kelty made out of goose down (nothing better for insulation) and rated to either 20 or 15 deg. I think it weighs less than 3 lbs. Very nice!!!

    You might want to back off the price and get a heavier bag if you are looking at car camping or something similar.

    As far as what to look for, I don't think there are many brands out there now that beat Slumberjack for value to price ratio. Big names like kelty, north face, etc... are normally trustworthy. You want to look for a bag with some SERIOUSLY beefed up zippers and seams, probably get a mummy style bag as they're warmer. Def get one w/ the insulation held in place throughout the bag by seams. This way the insulation doesn't all collect at the bottom and you don't freeze.

    My best advise is start here:
    http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/s...egoryId=244&catalogId=40000000226&storeId=226
    and see what's in your performance price range and then look at comments at other outdoor sites or ask here. Best of luck!!
     

  3. KodiakG-22C

    KodiakG-22C

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    Thanks for your help!
    I'm not looking for something to sleep out under the stars with in 30degree weather. Just something for camping during summer and into the fall while hunting. Weight is no factor because I won’t be carrying it into the woods on my back. Just something to carry in the truck and crawl into when I need it.
    I will check out the link.

    Thanks,
    Kodiak
     
  4. suckersrus

    suckersrus

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    I've been using a Wiggys Ultima Thule for several years now. I had him make me one that fits me (short and wide). They are used by the Alaska State Troopers and Alaska Air Guard.

    When hunting and camping, my buddies complain about getting cold at night while I complain I was too warm and had to ventilate the foot of my bag. WaaaWaaaWaaa.

    I have the FTRSS which is 2 bags (inner and outer). This gives the user three temp ranges.

    The only drawback is it takes up more space than say ... a down bag. But it is so warm and comfy I make room for it.

    The Wiggys' site has all the ratings and information.

    http://www.wiggys.com/moreinfo.cfm?Product_ID=59

    Wiggy says, "The Ultima Thule is a -20 degree rated sleeping bag. It is the most under rated bag I make. It is used regularly at temperatures of -40 degrees. The loft averages 7.5 inches. The weight for a regular/regular is 5 pounds. Weight and size increments are the same as the Ultra Light . Stuff size is 11 inches x 23 inches, in a compression stuff sack. Add $164.00 for the Flexible Temperature Range Sleep System (FTRSS).
    Our Price: $265.00
    Special: 20% off all sleeping bags!"
     
  5. duncan

    duncan Lifetime Member Millennium Member

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    I go camping monthy as an Asst Scoutmaster to a boy scout troop.

    For spring and summer camping, you can get basically any bag at Target. I have some no-name bag that has served me excpetionally well. You could go for even a Coleman $30 bag and be fine since you are only using it a couple times a year.

    I prefer bags with a pillow sewed into the head and bags that are spacious enough to turn aroun in.

    Aim to get one that can zipper or be tied off. Even in the summer, it can get down to the high 40s.

    You can even take a cheap Coleman bag and grab a wool blanket and then you have a winter bag good down to 0 degrees.

    Was snow camping in that cheap Coleman bag in February down to 23 degrees and slept like a baby nice and cozy.

    Avoid REI and other retailers telling you that you need to blwo $150 on a bag for light use.
     
  6. J. Parker

    J. Parker

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    Summer or fall camping? Don't waste your money. Get a cheapo at Wallyworld. The only time you need a hardcore bag is when the temp goes WAY down.
     
  7. RWBlue

    RWBlue Mr. CISSP, CISA CLM

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    Or if you want to go light weight.

    I have a van bag that I can use from 70 degrees to 0 comfortably. It is square. It is cotton. It is configurable. If weight and size doesn't matter, it is great.

    But in the past couple years, I have been trying to carry less.

    I have a Swiss surplus bags that is good to 40 degrees.
    I have a Blue Kazoo, that I haven't pushed, but it should be good to 20 degrees.

    Remember, sleeping bag ratings are a joke. You may be able to sleep in a 20 degree bag at 20 degrees and be comfortable, while the next guy may freeze if he/she is in a 20 degree bag at 30 degrees.
     
  8. Vic303

    Vic303 Senior Member

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    Mountain Hardwear down liner bag is great. Not mummy but is tapered, can be zipped into another bag for extra warmth, weight is minimal and compresses easily.
     
  9. MooseJaw

    MooseJaw NRA Lifer CLM

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    Personally, I can't stand the flannel linings..

    Gotta get something that's slick inside..

    And big enough to spin around in..

    Otherwise, I'm not very picky..
     
  10. Gbuilder

    Gbuilder

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    with all the new technology in synthetic fillers, I would stay away from down. Down bags are pretty much ruined if they get wet, and because of the newer synthetic stuff (which is in the same price range) the advantage of lighter down filling is no longer as great. I have a mountain hardwear synthetic bag that is good down to 40 degrees and weighs about a pound even. It compacts to about the size of a grapefruit. Add a bag liner and you are good to well below zero. Go ahead and get a high quality bag, it will be well worth the comfort of both sleeping in it, and packing it in. I've backpacked 300+ miles of the AT, all in 50+ mile section hikes, and my advice is that your sleeping bag can make or break your night in the woods.
     
  11. SDDL-UP

    SDDL-UP

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    Are you guys not reading? Summer to fall - IN MICHIGAN! I live in Montana and would NEVER purchase a bag with a temperature rating of anything higher than 20 degrees. For a fall hunting bag a 5 degree bag would probably be a good bet. Yes stay away from down, it's expensive, and doesn't insulate when wet. You aren't backpacking with it so you shouldn't care if you can compress the bag to the size of a loaf of bread. DON'T go for a cheapo bag!
     
  12. jtull7

    jtull7 Pistolero CLM

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    REI. Huge selection for whatever your needs may be.
     
  13. 10mmAuto

    10mmAuto

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    Money isn't a concern. I want one that is a mummy style and will withstand extreme cold, below 0 degrees with a harsh wind at night.

    Thanks.
     
  14. mitchshrader

    mitchshrader Deceased

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    qualify as 'too good'.

    happens i've slept on bare ice at 5F, and know what it takes. :)

    a fair amount. air mattress isn't wrong, thickest pad you can carry is ok too, wool blanket, HEAVY wool blanket, doubled, is good, between the bag and the outer cover.

    if you want to do it with a single unit, plan on building in ground insulation and/or have a pad.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/cu...g-goods&qid=1183845171&sr=1-1#customerReviews

    might check that price elsewhere but it seems beatable, i find down to $340 with a few peeks around.
     
  15. vafish

    vafish

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    Below 0 with a harsh wind?

    I put my sleeping bag inside one of these at night:



    [​IMG]

    Crank the heater up and I stay nice and warm.

    Gotta watch the water pipes though.
     
  16. groundhawg

    groundhawg

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    i saw a big honkin minus 30 bag in sportsmans guide for $60. -30 may seem like over-kill but you can always use it as a blanket or unzip the bag during the summer and it will keep you warm on the hunting trips.
     
  17. kAr

    kAr Netware Rocks!

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    +1 on the Wiggys FTRSS. Previously my feet would freeze in a cheap synthetic bag in a tent, now I've been quite toasty sleeping under the stars exposed on granite outcroppings in the Sierras in the Wiggys bag. It is expensive, but I plan to use it for a long time. It's probably the only domestically produced bag, and it has a lifetime warranty.