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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Originally posted by ahtsay
antediluvianist are you my professor that has that sweet 7 shot 357 S&W? Now you're looking for an extra shot?

:supergrin: Why torture yourself, get a 1911 and you can have as much as 19 rounds in the mag and one in the chamber!!! hehehe!!! "

Oh, I owned a 1911 once. Might eventually get one again, but those things do malfunction once in a while/are bullet-shape sensitive etc.. In the middle of the night, say 3 am, I am VERY sleepy and I need something with flat-pointed bullets inside that I can just pickup and point and click. Also, my God the SA on the S&W 686Plus is so ...orgasmically smooth. Lastly, well some people shoot semiautos better and some people shoot revolvers better.. this 7-shooter is soooo accurate. Besides, you only have to disassemble a revolver once in 2-3 years or so - cleaning and oiling the visible parts is enough for general maintenance.

If I get the 627, that will be the main gun and the 686Plus will be the "New York reload". After 15 shots, either the intruder is dead or I am. (Anyway, revolver speedloaders are not so fast but not so slow either, if it comes to that.)

Hello there. I'll PM you about the other matter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Originally posted by asian_glockster
I think you will be using either half moon or full moon clips if you're going to use the 627 sir...
Ah yes, that's right. comes drilled for moonclips. Forgot about that.

here's a pasage from a review of the 627 :

"The Model 627-5 also comes with three full-moon clips for eight rounds of .357 ammo. They worked and ejected well, but I can't say they sped up the reload all that much. It seems the long length of the .357 Magnum cases more or less worked against a quick, speedy reload. While it was faster than loading each round individually, it wasn't as fast as reloading a conventional six-shot Model 27 with a standard speedloader. I soon found I preferred to leave the full-moon clips in the bright aluminum Performance Center case the gun was shipped in."

Hmmmm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Haven't carried moonclips but my HK speedloaders are carried inside round, fairly rigid pouches, so I suppose that's how moonclips could be carried too.

jundeleon, you own a 686+ too, per your signature ; so do you use HK speedloaders or something else? Personally for a shooting session at a range I don't bother with speedloaders. They are just there in the immensely unlikely scenario of a real confrontation someday. They came as part of a nice package when I bought my 686+ from a BOG.

What I really want to get is the "Longwitz Hardia" (a German company) spring-assisted speedloader made for the 7-shot 686+

It's called the : "Longwitz SL-Variant III Safety Speedloader, number 72" .

Longwitz Hardia has a good website, with an English version, http://www.longwitz-waffenpflege.com/shop/index_e.php (register as Guest and then click on "Longwitz SL-Variant speedloader & RQS-set", then click on "Longwitz SL-Variant III Safety Speedloader, number 72" .
They do mail orders. I have some relatives in Germany, so I'll just bug them some day to mail me two of the Longwitz speedloaders , to be sure they get here. 25 euros, about $32, each, plus shipping. In a gunfight, they would make all the difference since the HK speedloaders are not exactly speedy, or maybe you have practiced a lot so they are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
"I read somewhere that the 7 shooters have some sort of timing problems and speed loaders are hard to come by."

HK, Longwitz , Maxifire (the rubber speedloaders) and I believe Safariland make 7-shooter speedloaders that fit the S&W 686Plus, the Taurus 7-shooter (don't remember the model number), and whatever other 7-shooters are out there.

7-shooters were made to emulate the 7-round capacity of the 1911's magazine. Of course in the 1911, you can also have a round in the chamber if you carry/store it that way.

Re: going out of time , well there are posts of all sorts on various forums about every conceivable topic. Actually, the more rounds are in the revolver cylinder, other things being about equal- and things are equal framewise/sizewise etc. between the 686 and the 686Plus - the shorter is the the trigger pull - the rounds are closer together in the cylinder. Best way to look at it is this : let's say the revolver cylinder has only TWO holes in it. So, you have to roll the cylinder all the way around 180 degress to get to the second round. That's a long trigger pull, and the point is that the greater momentum of the cylinder in such a long, fast roll is harder to stop than if it's a shorter-distance roll to the next round, and so the wear on the parts that move the cylinder around and stop it and hold it in precise alignment is greater. Owners have posted that the 627's trigger pull is relatively short for this reason.

Also, the cuts in the cylinder for the 7-shooter are IN BETWEEN the holes, whereas for the 686 6-shooter the cuts are right on top of the holes; many posters have stated that therefore the 7-shooter's cylinder is stronger.

Lastly, odd-round capacity (5 and 7 -shooters) revolvers are no different from even-capacity (6 and 8- shooters) revolvers. Personally, I'd rather have more rounds than less - speedloaders are not really that fast except for people like Miculek.. Some traditionalists prefer 6-shooters because of..well... tradition.

Anyway, good luck on whatever S&W you eventually get, 686 or 627 or whatever. Either is worthy of being fondled.
 
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