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Oh, for a muse of fire
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For reasons I really don't understand I have always been drawn to old cemeteries. I went to one this afternoon and was walking around, reading names, dates and inscriptions when I saw these 3 clustered together. There was no apparent relation, I was just struck that 3 families could lose so many children, some in a very short period of time. I cannot imagine the emotional devastation the parents must have felt.

HEADSTONE 1.jpg


HEADSTONE 2.jpg


HEADSTONE 3.jpg
 

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USMC (MOS 0369) (RVN 69-70)
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Very uplifting.... They are interesting though.
 
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And people complain today about how bad they have it.

There was a very old, overgrown cemetery on the property of a plant I used to work at. I was involved in a a small clean-up effort.

We found some Civil War burials there.
 

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Not unusual considering the dates. Life for the young was a lot tougher. Improvements in medicine (education), personal hygiene, food safety, working conditions and sanitation gave us the luxurious life style we all beech about. Things have been worse!

One of my favorite pics from early 20th century.
Didn't these guys know smoking can be hazardous to their health. :D
steel work.jpg
 

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I have been researching my family's history for many years. I have run across many headstones that tug at your heartstrings. So much pain for those families. It would be interesting to google for epidemics in the area during that time frame. As we sit here with our TVs, refrigerators, A/C and COVID; we can imagine what it was like for them during an outbreak.
 

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Death is always tragic but you have to put in context of the times. Life expectancy was probably around 45 and many more children were lost young than they are today. Mothers were also at risk. Childbirth was hard dangerous business. I'm not saying that those losses didn't effect the parents but it wasn't nearly as uncommon as it is today to lose a child.

I'm also interested in old cemeteries. They certainly dealt with a lot more hardship than what we do today. I wonder what their reaction would be to how people in general are handling our "crisis" today?
 

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Not unusual considering the dates. Life for the young was a lot tougher. Improvements in medicine (education), personal hygiene, food safety, working conditions and sanitation gave us the luxurious life style we all beech about. Things have been worse!

One of my favorite pics from early 20th century.
Didn't these guys know smoking can be hazardous to their health. :D
View attachment 752764
You do know that photo was a set up photo. They were not really sitting on a steel beam high up.
My mother was born in 1910, she was one of 13 children, 10 of her brothers and sisters died in early childhood from one of the several diseases children could get back then. It was a emotional even for her to tell me about them.
In June of 1938 her mother was on the Olympian Flyer train on her way to Seattle when it plunged into Custer Creek outside of Miles City Montana. The bridge had been washed out during a sever storm, 47 killed. I still have the telegraph message sent to her.
 

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My great grandmother lived 1869-1964 and her husband (my great grandfather) 1868-1951. She and her sister were orphans. I think the sister died in her 30's.

With one exception, my mom who lived to 96, later generations did not fare nearly as well.
 

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Philippians 4: 6-7
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My dad had a sister that was born in 1908 and died in 1909 of pneumonia. She was only 11 months old. My dad's father (my grandfather) was a country doctor but sadly antibiotics were no where in the picture back then. She died before my dad was born.
 

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Two members of our fire brigade who died while on active duty are buried in our local cemetery.

Richard Ridings died of a stroke at a big fire on Christmas day 1913 and Joe LeScelle died when the fire engine crashed in 1924.

There's a few other ex-members buried there too. A couple of times a year I spray weedkiller and moss remover on their graves to keep them looking tidy.
 

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You hit it OP... Old cemeteries are one of my favorite places to learn more of U.S. History....especially at the local level... With the internet it’s often helpful to understand why 3, 4, or 5 members of a family passed away between 1910 and 1920... Spanish Flu perhaps? If you can research at a local level, house fires have always taken a helluva toll over the past 150 years... Thanks for posting....
 

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Death is always tragic but you have to put in context of the times. Life expectancy was probably around 45 and many more children were lost young than they are today. Mothers were also at risk. Childbirth was hard dangerous business. I'm not saying that those losses didn't effect the parents but it wasn't nearly as uncommon as it is today to lose a child.

I'm also interested in old cemeteries. They certainly dealt with a lot more hardship than what we do today. I wonder what their reaction would be to how people in general are handling our "crisis" today?
I shudder to think of what previous generations would think of what we call a “crisis.”
 

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Mr. Awesome
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Last year, I helped mow the 77 acre cemetery, in town. Some if the old stones are incredible. Yes, a very many died at a young age.
 

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I am a Civil War Buff. I like to walk cemeteries and look for military headstones from the great unpleasantness of the mid 19th century. I will write down the names and unit numbers, then look them up on the interweb to find the regiments battles.
 
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