Live round jammed in chamber....

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by Nemesis., Sep 21, 2020.

  1. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    If it was me, I'd remove the striker and pull out the extractor spring while I was at it. Then I'd take some wood, rubber or plastic and tap down on the barrel hood to unlock it and remove the barrel. Then I'd take a dowel or squib rod and tap out the round from the muzzle end.
     
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  2. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    So why not remove the backplate, striker and extractor spring first? Then why pry and scratch your gun, when it is much, much easier to tap the barrel hood from above?
     

  3. nutsnax

    nutsnax

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    You want the extractor to remain engaged, so removing the backplate will release tension on the extractor.

    Also, the flathead screwdriver method is the method that allows one to extract the round without putting any part of your body in front of the muzzle while there is a live round in the chamber of a barrel.

    Not sure about scratches? I've not had scratching when I've done it but you could probably put some duct tape/electrical tape over the screwdriver to mitigate this.
     
  4. J_Rico

    J_Rico

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    I think you should take it to a gunsmith...:D
     
  5. halfmoonclip

    halfmoonclip

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    I think the OP had this sorted out, but why would we want the extractor to remain engaged? Won't it hold the offending cartridge against the breechface, making it harder to push the barrel down out of the slide. Maybe I'm missing something.
    Once the barrel is free of the slide, a range rod down the barrel doesn't pose a problem. No real reason the stuck round should fire at that point, and you don't have to be in front of either end of the barrel to tap it out.
    Moon
     
  6. nutsnax

    nutsnax

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    you could do it that way too, the way I said is really more for if the round is jammed in there and you're at the range and want to try to continue your range session but don't have a rod or mallet to pop the thing out.
     
  7. halfmoonclip

    halfmoonclip

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    nuts', point taken. We're spoiled here in Westsylvania; I have an outdoor range 5 minutes away, and an indoor one that is 25, both with unlimited use.
    Yinz guys paying for range time is another deal.
    Moon
     
  8. Mugsie1

    Mugsie1

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    After speaking to glock, they did tell me the new marksman barrels do have shorter lead ins. I had an issue with ammo I had previously reloaded years ago. It worked in every gun I owned, except the 43x. I called glock, and they told me about the free bore being shorter. Once shortening the rounds, they worked fine. They were OK for years in every other pistol, just not this one. Sometimes new and improved isn't always better.
     
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  9. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    Why on earth would I want "the extractor to remain engaged"? I don't see any benefit at all to that.
     
  10. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    At the range taking 30 seconds to pull out the striker and extractor spring/bearing isn't going to hold you up much.
     
  11. Walter Bishop

    Walter Bishop

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    So how did the gunsmith get the cartridge out?
     
  12. Nemesis.

    Nemesis.

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    Dunno. The store owner took the gun back to the gunsmith's shop. Ten, fifteen minutes later he came out with the gun and round. He just wanted to show me why it jammed.
     
  13. ba27spider

    ba27spider

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    When I started reloading, I had a squib in a Shield 9. I was with a shooting buddy who also was brand new to reloading. To say the least it wasn't a shining moment of my new hobby, but between the two of us we realized what the issue was. From that day forward, I now include a rubber mallet and a wood dowel in the range bag.
    A recently acquired 19.4 had an issue with reloads chambering. With the pistol pointed down range, a light tap on the back of the slide with the rubber mallet persuaded the round to chamber.
    I adjusted the crimp slightly when reloading. Lesson learned, plunk test the reloads before heading to the range.
     
  14. halfmoonclip

    halfmoonclip

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    Some of the guys at the Club are determined not to 'over crimp' their loads, and they inevitably have trouble either feeding or fully chambering.
    Nothing wrong with a firm taper crimp, but not to the point of distorting the boolit.
    Moon
     
  15. 9x45

    9x45 Millennium Member

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    New ammo is no guarantee of not having issues. I have eye witnessed all the things that can go wrong in 50 years, including KB's, and not just on Glocks either. OAL is too long, bullet setback, lack of crimp, primer in backwards, or no flash hole in the case. So if you choose to use reloads, like 95% of us hundreds of thousands of USPSA/IDPA/Steel Challenge/Multi Gun shooters who run 20K to 60K plus rounds a year, there certain steps involved***. Most commercial reloads, like MiWall or Atlanta Arms, for example, are licensed by the BATF to manufacture ammo and carry liability insurance. Their products are generally very reliable. Now if you buy garage sale reloads, or Bubba's reloads at a gun show, that's a whole another deal. If they cannot tell you what powder type, charge weight, bullet brand, construction, weight and OAL of the round, don't buy it.

    *** All reloads, step one is to case gage every round (and a visual for upside primer and bullet setback). Step 2 is to plunk test (chamber check) every round in the barrel of the gun you are going to shoot it out of. Step 3 is to function fire at least 10 rounds, and chrono as many to be sure the velocity is what expected for the bullet weight. If your 115 gr loads are only going 800 fps they probably won't cycle the gun. If your 147's are going 1,300 fps, it is well into KaBoom pressures.

    There are certain brass you never use. These are the so called stepped brass, AmmoLoad, Freedom Munitions, IMT and MaxxTech. They have steps and are subject to case separation at the step, which leaves a brass sleeve in the chamber, and you with a dead gun.

    If you choose to load your own ammo someday, then start with quality jacketed or HiTek coated bullets, not cast. Get new or once fired same head stamp brass. Use powders that fill at least 60% of the case, and use the powder makers websites published load data, not something off the internet.

    [​IMG]
     
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