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Linux?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk' started by echo99, Aug 13, 2004.

  1. echo99

    echo99

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    Somone tell me which linux is best for a home user, with no knowledge of how to use linux. Is there a Linux simulator? I need to know how does linux works with the internet? Is it like starting over with computers and software? I have office 2000, is it compatable etc. (for GUI use) Seems like theres tons of versions of Linux. Some free, some for a charge. Is this even made for home users, or just servers like Unix.

    Is this very hard to install?
     
  2. CMA G21

    CMA G21

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    Try Xandros. They have a free version and several premium versions (including some that run MS Office and some other Windows programs)
     

  3. Dandapani

    Dandapani

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    Knoppix is a good first trial Linux. You can boot and run off CDROM. Mandrake has a lot of believers (it's French, you know). I'm using RH9 and Fedora Core 2, myself.
     
  4. ronin_asano

    ronin_asano

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    red hat and mandrake are usually good for newbies.

    there is a 'lindows' distro, but i can't recall if they offer downloadable iso images

    knoppix is cool too, if you just want to boot to it and see what it's like.

    you don't need office 2000 with linux, and no, it's not compatible unless you have third party emulators which may or may not be included in your distro. you replace ms office with open office (www.openoffice.org) which is a better program anyway. it will read and write to ms office formats, but use the native oo formats whenever possible, they are much better.

    you can get most of the major distros here:

    www.linuxiso.org
     
  5. Tennessee Slim

    Tennessee Slim Señor Member CLM

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    WinLinux and Phat Linux give you the opportunity to explore Leenuks without having to dedicate a system to it.
     
  6. Halo

    Halo Millennium Member

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    SuSE also has a "live-eval" version that can run entirely from CD, for your evaluation purposes.

    I'm currently running SuSE 9.1 and Fedora Core 2. It can be quite intimidating for new users simply because you have the ability to control virtually every aspect of the operating system. But stick with it and you will start to learn it. You can install it on a small partition of 4-5 gigs and dual boot with Windows, so you don't really have to "lose" anything.
     
  7. Alpha752

    Alpha752

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    Distros are as individual as your brand of soap. Everyone has one they like and are loyal to. I am just starting out with Linux, as you are, and I am using Mandrake 10. It seems really good, and I am learning a lot with it. The only issue I had was setting up a wireless network, but I got it to work. I like 'drake, and I hear Red Hat is good too. Give it a shot, I think youll like it.

    Russ
     
  8. sandboy6184

    sandboy6184

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    www.linuxiso.org , go there and get knoppix, burn to CD, and run it, the whole OS runs off the cd, so you dont have to install anything.
     
  9. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    The only problem with CD-run versions is that you cannot customize your environment, save the changes, or otherwise much tinker with it, which to me takes away from the pleasure of learning and making it "my" system.

    I believe strongly in forcing oneself to live in the system (use it all the time) as a way to learn. Call it the "OS immersion" if you will.

    If I could get Photoshop and MS Office for Linux (the first one for myself, the second for compatibility with my work), I would never again install Windows. I run Linux not only on my servers, but on my laptop, too, which I use for work (I do presentations from it, but it also doubles as a portable server).

    If you don't mind learning, and you don't mind making a lot of mistakes, and you don't mind occassional frustrations, you will do very well.

    As to the distributions, any of the major ones will do nicely. I run Red Hat 9 (the latest open source version is called Fedora), but both SuSe and Mandrake are fine. If it matters to you, Red Hat is American-owned (a public company), but Fedora is an international project (supported by Red Hat); SuSe was originally a German company, now owned by Novell; Mandrake is French.

    Don't forget there is also FreeBSD, a superb server operating system, but that's a bit out of your scope now.

    Oh, you asked how Linux works with the Internet. In a word, very well. Its networking capabilities are far ahead of Windows.
     
  10. HerrGlock

    HerrGlock Scouts Out CLM

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    The Gimp and Open Office.

    DanH
     
  11. ronin_asano

    ronin_asano

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    that's not the case with knoppix. it gives you the option to create a permanent /home directory that will allow you to save customized settings.
     
  12. Alpha752

    Alpha752

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    Openoffice is compatable with MS office. Now THATS cool.
     
  13. ronin_asano

    ronin_asano

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    have you used it? it's so much better than ms office. i use it on my windows machines.
     
  14. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    Hm. I write courseware as part of my work, and trust me, Open Office is NOT 100% compatible with MS Office. Now, Open Office could be sufficient for my private use, but when a company expects a deliverable in MS Office format, and you deliver it in Open Office, and then others who work with you on the project have to struggle with little incompatibilities, your life on that project is not going to be long. Also, many teams use editing features of Word. Good luck with Open Office. Same with Master Documents when building a book from many sources.

    As to Photoshop and Gimp, yes, I use Gimp, have it installed on my laptop, but it is not Photoshop. Until Gimp starts doing colorspace management, it cannot seriously encroach into Photoshop territory.

    So, I do appreciate (and use) both of the above, but for two separate reasons, they are not 100% replacements for the commercial packages.
     
  15. ronin_asano

    ronin_asano

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    100% compatible, no, but i can tell you that i use open office in my corporate enviroment and share and edit documents with ms office users and to this point i have not come across any issues.
     
  16. echo99

    echo99

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    Linux is a command line OS right, like Unix, but it has a GUI shell. Is that correct? I will need to pick up a book for all the commands for it. I saw the Suse version of it in Compusa, I mean it looks nice. But in reality, how does it work with my HP printer, Video cards, NIC, USB devices. All these require a version of Windows to work. Does this mean I have to buy new cards? Or does Linux have a converter for the MS based drivers? I have not seen any games out there that say Linux compatible on them either.
     
  17. HerrGlock

    HerrGlock Scouts Out CLM

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  18. Halo

    Halo Millennium Member

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    Most commercial distributions have a pretty good driver library with them these days. SuSE has always had among the best support for hardware, in my experience. Just remember you can download Linux distributions free of charge. If you buy it in the store most of what you're paying for is technical support and possibly some application suites not included with the free version. If I were you I'd just download as many distributions as possible and try them all to see which one you like best. All you do is download an ISO (CD image) and burn it to disc.
     
  19. hwyhobo

    hwyhobo

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    That's correct. In fact, when you start exploring, you will find that most of the GUI options for Linux beat the pants off Windows for usability.
    Most common devices work just fine. My camera, mouse, radio gyro mouse (for presentations), and usb-powered wireless ethernet adapter share a powered mini usb hub attached to my Red Hat Linux laptop without any problems.
    That's outside of my territory. I find other Linux uses to far "outfun" gaming.
     
  20. echo99

    echo99

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    If I do like you guys say and burn it to a CD and load it, are you refering to dual booting, or do you recommend a clean hdd? If I mess up is the partition screwed? Or should I just get another hdd and start fresh. (common sense would recommend, yet costs me a new hdd)