Limp-wristing a Glock. Interesting video

Discussion in 'General Glocking' started by jdw174, Feb 18, 2013.

  1. jdw174

    jdw174

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    Agree or disagree...I'm just the messenger here:whistling:

    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_Uqtz2asE4"]Limp Wristing Glock Pistols - YouTube[/ame]
     
  2. G26S239

    G26S239 NRA Patron

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    I agree. He is not the first person to notice this or report it.
     

  3. Two Guns

    Two Guns VIP MEMBER

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    I have tried to limp wrist my Glock 26 and it can't be done. Is this only for the G19 and G17?
     
  4. Bill Lumberg

    Bill Lumberg

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    It can be done with any gun, moreso with lightweight guns like glock. Not mysterious or terribly rare, particularly with novice shooters or those new to glocks.
     
  5. WayneJessie

    WayneJessie

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    I also agree with his comments.
     
  6. slowgoat

    slowgoat

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    Good stuff. Interesting that the metal framed weapons are not as prone to FTE. Physics would agree that this is the truth.
     
  7. WayneJessie

    WayneJessie

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    Makes sense. I have a CZ 75C that has yet to have a malfunction of any kind in over 8000 rounds. Obviously in the last two months there have been scores of first-time pistol owners that have purchased polymer compact guns of all brands and many of them have little or no instruction on how to shoot the thing and naturally when it jams up on them they feel like the gun is defective. Some poly guns are having issues that are not related to the shooter though but unfortunately the emerging concealed carry nation has alot of new first time shooters that are clouding gun problems with grip problems. I tend to believe a fella that been shooting for years when he buys a new pistol and the thing does not want to extract or eject properly. It's probably not him but a gun issue. I don't believe for a second that all of Glock's recent issues with ejection is the owner's fault I don't believe it's 115gr ammo at fault either. The water is so muddy right now it is hard to tell which is which though.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2013
  8. Just_plinking

    Just_plinking

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    Pretty common sense stuff. A glock frame don't weigh much, which is a good thing in most ways.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2013
  9. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    And common knowledge among experienced instructors and Glock shooters. But try telling that to the newbs in General Glocking who think the problem can't be them, so the gun needs to be sent to Glock for "repairs" (at which point Glock will clean it and send it back).

    One thing I have noticed that is common to limpwristers and is shown in the video, is not having the bore in line with the forearm when firing. Notice that he angles the so the slide recoils at an agle toward his thumb, rather than directly back toward his shoulder. To any trained shooter, it would be a terrible grip, but I see a lot of newbs who are "self taught" who have created that habit and others who do it because they have short or weak fingers and are reaching for the trigger.

    There is simply no more common cause of Glock malfunctions than limpwristing shooters. For those who don't do it naturally, on the other hand, it can be very difficult to even recreate on purpose.
     
    Last edited: Feb 18, 2013
  10. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    Any one can do it. I've seen that it is more common with the 19 than any other model - probably a combination of shorter barrel, heavier recoil spring than a 17, lighter gun and same ammo.
     
  11. AstraPat

    AstraPat

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    Good vid! However, I am interested how the mechanics of each particular gun (recoil spring weight) has to do with the issue as well. :dunno:

    P
     
  12. Gravitas

    Gravitas

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    enlightening...physics!
     
  13. MLittle

    MLittle

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    In a defensive situation it may be impossible to obtain a "proper" grip of a Glock, and it would be a very unfortunate to have a malfunction just at the moment a person could least afford it. To me it's a downside to polymer pistols. Before you flame me, I own Glock pistols and I believe the weight advantage of polymer over steel or aluminum is an advantage......but, it is something to consider when selecting a defensive firearm.
     
  14. jeffz

    jeffz

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    I am pretty much a newbie. I grew up shooting, but its been a long time. Just purchased my first Glock. I haven't had a problem yet, but I've read a lot if people talking about limp wristing. Maybe the title itself should explain it, but could someone tell me exactly what limp wristing looks like and how not to do it? While I am re learning how to handle a firearm correctly, I would prefer to know how to avoid doing it.

    Thanks
     
  15. slowgoat

    slowgoat

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    I'd like to add that I've never had an issue with my G19, so I must not have been too prone to limp writing. But with my DB9 in particular I had to squeeze the thing until my knuckles were white before it would not FTE or stovepipe.

    I don't trust it. I trust my G19 with my life.

    Here are some good links about this subject, the first being especially informative.

    http://www.keltecforum.com/articles/a8/a8.html

    http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles2/ayoob85.html

    http://www.christiangunowner.com/correct_handgun_grip.html

    I hope you enjoy them.
     
  16. pmer

    pmer

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    The physics part got me interested.

    The G19 has less mass in the frame but slide is also smaller compared to the G17?

    Wouldn't a full mag help fight limp wristing because of the added mass to frame?

    I have a 19 but no 17, do frames on both models have the same amout of area in the guides that mate to the groves in the slide?

    I'm just wondering if there is some added friction between frame and slide just as slide starts moving or if it takes a little more to unlock a G19. Both would take away some inertia giving trouble to a person suffering from limp wristing.

    In the video when he was short stroking the G19 too bad he didn't add a hunk of steel on the rail to add mass while he was doing the limp wrist test to see if it would eject better.
     
  17. Bren

    Bren NRA Life Member

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    I shoot with all sorts of grips - one handed, left or right, from all sorts of positions, to include balancing on a rocking boat and sitting on a motorcycle in some matches I've shot. Never had a malfunction. It's not like you have to have a perfect or even good grip - some people just go to an extreme that creates a problem.
     
  18. ak103k

    ak103k

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    I tried to duplicate his results when he first started posting these videos a couple of years back. I was using one of my 17's, and the only way I could get the gun to have a problem, was when I held it sideways as he does, between my thumb and trigger finger. Even then, I had about a 1 in 3 failure rate, and more often than not, it was 1 in more than that.

    Now when I held the gun more normally, but with absolutely no grip at all, if fired every round for 4 full mags (68 rounds) with troubles at all.

    By "normally", I mean with my wrist behind the gun, even when held with everything out of line, IE. wrist bent, elbow bent, and no locked joints.

    The "no grip" was just that, the gun was just resting on the web of my hand, and the trigger guard on top of my middle finger. The only thing keeping the gun from leaving my hand when fired, was my trigger finger in the guard. I really wasnt "holding" the gun at all.

    Ive taught a lot of people to shoot over the years, and the only time Ive ever encountered what I would call limp wristing, has been mostly with young kids, and a couple of women who had never fired a pistol before. In every case I can remember, the reason for the problem wasnt the "wrist", but them allowing the gun and their arm to move rearwards with recoil. Once I showed them the problem, and once they understood, it was never an issue again. I think the problem is more limp "arming" than it is limp "wristing".

    Two other things I'd like to point out, are the "injured" issue, and the actual shooting of the gun at a target while this is going on.

    They keep bringing up, that "if youre injured" youre going to have the issue. I dont agree, as long as your wrist is behind the gun for one, and why wouldnt you just switch hands if you were? I know if Im injured and cant properly shoot with my strong hand, Im immediately switching to my weak hand and continuing on. Just because my hand might not be working, doesnt mean my brain still isnt.

    The actual shooting thing has to do with actually trying to hit what youre aiming at. When I was trying to get the gun to not work properly, I was also trying to hit a photo "people" target at the same time. I figured that might be important in real life. What I found was, when held even remotely normally, I usually hit what I was pointing at. When I held it sideways, I was lucky to hit the full sheet of paper, let alone the person on it.
     
  19. ditto1958

    ditto1958

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    Does it make any difference whether its a Gen 3 or a Gen 4 G19?

    Am I imagining this, or was there some question when Gen 4 G19's came out about the spring being too strong?


    Posted using Outdoor Hub Campfire
     
  20. JuneyBooney

    JuneyBooney

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    I agree. Lightweight and small caliber with less pressure seems to be the problem. I agree with the video guy too.