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What, if any, are the advantages of using a light recoil spring in a Glock?
What are the disadvantages ( I would imagine that it might be hard on the pistol)?
I have heard of competition shooters sometimes using light recoil springs.
 

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Scottish Member
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What, if any, are the advantages of using a light recoil spring in a Glock?
What are the disadvantages ( I would imagine that it might be hard on the pistol)?
I have heard of competition shooters sometimes using light recoil springs.
The lighter spring is so that loads near minimum PF will reliability operate the gun without FTE's or FTF's.

The load you see to the left is ~130 PF with a 13# ISMI recoil spring on an OEM guide rod.

If you are using heavier loadings, (full power SD ammunition, +P, +P+, or major PF) on a routine basis a lighter spring will be harder on the gun.

Not a dumb question, there is a lot of misunderstanding about this.
 

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I have a KKM 9mm conversion barrel for my Glock 23. When shooting my modest 9mm loads I have much better reliability cycling using a reduced power recoil spring.

I bought mine off fleabay. I have the details at home, this one is a handful of lbs less.
 

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On the Border
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The idea is to balance the spring and load energy. OE Glocks are heavily sprung, partly to help ensure they will go into battery with less than perfect ammo, or with crud in the chamber. I guess another benefit would be to help feed wider hollow-point (carry) bullets.

Too much spring tends to make the muzzle dive, so sights take longer to recover. If you case your ammo and aren’t worried about having to throw your gun in a mud puddle, you might see benefit from a lighter spring.

I use #14 springs in my G34’s, with ammo loaded to ~132PF. That feels balanced to me, and the guns run fine. I use OE springs in carry guns.

There is some subjectivity in this. Bullet weight and powder burn rate are also considerations. Fast powders and heavy bullets give a quick recoil impulse and soft discharge, but you can run into mechanical problems if the gun is not supported well.

As others have said, overly light springs can allow the slide to beat up on the frame.

OE Glocks are designed around reliability in a broad variety of potential circumstances. If you can eliminate some of those circumstances, then no need to suffer performance loss trying to compensate for them.
 

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Lighter springs increase slide speed, keeps gun flatter. In general you'll see shooters running major ammo using a spring in the 8 to 13 pound range. Lighter springs also work well with ammo that's loaded below minor. For the most part a factory spring will run minor ammo but performance may not be optimal.
 

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All of the above is correct. But...

When you depress the trigger to cock the firing pin, that force is working against the recoil spring and can cause the gun to come out of battery if the recoil spring is too light. It is a function of how light the recoil spring is compared to the firing pin spring.

So, to balance things out, you can lighten up the firing pin spring such that the gun stays in battery.

Of course, the lighter firing pin spring means lighter firing pin strikes so you can use a titanium firing pin to get higher firing pin velocity with the lighter spring.

And all the reliability of the Glock is right out the window!

Richard
 

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MacGyver
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Lighter recoil spring=

farther ejected brass for a given ammo (and/or different trajectory path)
less "perceived" recoil for the same ammo
Changing out the RSA
Easier racking
 
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