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Light polishing of Glock firing pin- Any downside?

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Having watched and done the Glock "25 cent trigger job" I was wondering if there is any advantage or disadvantage to gently polishing the entire Glock firing pin. No metal removal, of course, just a smoother finish for less resistance. Good results on the polishing and better still with an OEM Glock "-" connector and then an Overwatch DAT trigger.

Any thoughts or opinions?
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Both these responses make sense. A gentle polishing is one thing. Going crazy and actually removing metal and/or changing angles of engagement is quite another. Smoother parts tend to make everything run, well, smoother. When people go nuts and think they are armorers things tend to go wrong and unsafe.

Not looking for some crazy low trigger pull weight. A DAT trigger combined with a gently polished OEM "-" connector and mild "25 cent" polish yielded a consistent 4.5 lb +/- pull. The DAT gives a better re-set. Not usually a fan of non OEM parts, but the Overwatch DAT is well reviewed--and for good reason I should add.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No tool marks. I just was wondering about gently polishing the entire firing pin with Simichrome or jewelers rouge, etc. Zero metal removal - just a shiny smooth surface. We did this with a friend's Kahr (as well as the trigger bar) and it did make his pull noticeably smoother.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Range report from today: Trigger much improved. Groups much better and just an overall nicer feel. Really liking the gentle polishing and Overwatch DAT trigger. I wish I knew they offered an NP3 coated OEM minus connector before I ordered the trigger. A bit pricey at $33, so I'm sticking with my polished OEM connector. Shorter reset a plus, which is solely due to the DAT trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
checking the fired cases from my new G34.3 the firing pin impact depth looked shallow, using Flitz and a bit of elbow grease on the spring cup area of the firing pin and the spring cups themselves the impact looks almost doubled in depth.
No doubt there are specs for firing pin protrusion and depth of impact on cases. I would not want to exceed either for safety reasons. With a new pin tip wear is doubtful, but are there other causes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If you’re mechanically inclined and can afford a 35 dollar risk, you can take a pass or two on the lug face with some 800 grit sandpaper. Key is to keep the angle EXCTLY the same, peferably use a flat piece of glass under the sandpaper. Idea would be to remove any burrs or tooling marks. If it goes full machine pistol and you shoot your eye out, don’t say I didn’t warn you.
Fascinating such a tiny amount can make a difference. Wonder how much wear/how many rounds it would take to equal 1 or 2 passes as you describe.

For me a gentle polish was enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Also, if "polishing" causes wear in the same manner of the cruciform rubbing against the FP lug during normal firing, would you expect "polishing" to similarly risk beginning to shorten the useful service life of the FP (meaning its ability to maintain proper minimum 66% engagement with the cruciform)?

The FP is a plated part. Last time I asked, the plating was Teflon Nickel. It's purpose is to help protect the carbon steel from oxidation and corrosion (and probably helps reduce friction between other plated steel parts, as well). If you "polish" and compromise the plating, you may accelerate the normal wear & tear which may eventually expose the copper sub-layer beneath the Teflon Nickel, or even wear through to the steel.

Why do this? Is the cosmetic appearance to your eye more important than the corrosion-resistance properties of the plating?
It would indeed serve no purpose to polish a nickel plated part and would, in fact, be inadvisable. The pin I have is 20+ years old. I did not see what appeared to be such plating. Perhaps its on newer ones.

Excellent points nonetheless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
The teflon nickel has always been a rather dull, matte-like finish, depending on the parts. It really only becomes noticeable that it's plated when friction between some of the parts wear through to the copper layer, revealing it, like on frame rails, the "arms" of the locking block and the cruciform/FP contact areas.
Thank you. Yours is exactly why I post these questions. I obviously don't have all the answers. My firing pin is close to 25 years old. Wondering if they were so plated back then.
 
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