GlockTalk Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,065 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Anyone else like just plain old GI guns? I do, and I'd love to see yours if you can spare a pic or two.

I've been searching around for awhile for a simple GI 1911, looked at all the "new " offerings from Inland to Springfield to Kahr/Auto Ordnance, etc. Also had the chance, and passed, on several of the recently released CMP guns.

About a week ago I got on the trail of a relatively rare Colt, their 2004 release of the 1943 Colt WW2 Reproduction. You don't see too many on the market. Around 3000 made and it was put out of the Custom Shop at a time they were doing outstanding work. So...short story long...

20201028_132120.jpg
20201028_132227.jpg
20201028_132614.jpg

20201028_132557.jpg


True "Bump and a Hump" sights

20201028_132731.jpg


My first impressions are that this is a well fitted 1911. Almost no rattle and the slide feels like it's moving on ball bearings. Safety is precise in engagement and disengagement. Looking forward this coming weekend to taking it out to dance.

Anyone else have "mil-spec" originals or repros to share? C'mon, I showed you mine. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,065 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Colt Black Army Reproduction, only 750-units made.

View attachment 857904

Previously owned the Carbonia Blue repro, back in 2003 or so. They made around 3-4000 of those IIRC. I'll just say that carbonia is better reserved for small parts and screws rather than frames and slides. Even with regular/constant maintenance, the finish could rust if you just mentioned the word moisture.

The Black Oxide is the one to get in the series imo. Thanks for sharing yours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
My soon to be 98 year old father-in-law and WW II vet (oldest living vet in Lewis Co., KY) has two WWII 1911s in his gun safe. He went into battle a kid and came out a man.

Father-in-law is still independent and avid sportsman. Harvested 3 deer year before last and still tore up it he wasted a one round.

Probably closest I’ll ever get to owning one, is the Tisas clone picked up last Fall. Replaced the cheap grips with black GI issued grips which I believe were Navy issued? Also picked up pair of WWII era brown ones. Overall it’s a fine example and well built clone.








Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
955 Posts
Previously owned the Carbonia Blue repro, back in 2003 or so. They made around 3-4000 of those IIRC. I'll just say that carbonia is better reserved for small parts and screws rather than frames and slides. Even with regular/constant maintenance, the finish could rust if you just mentioned the word moisture.

The Black Oxide is the one to get in the series imo. Thanks for sharing yours.
I know that when the Carbonia Blued reproduction came out, it was called "carbonia" but; and I am being pedantic here, "carbonia bluing" was a Smith & Wesson name for charcoal bluing back in the days.

The Black Army Reproduction has a matte blued finish that looks black.

The ANVIII actually had the charcoal blued finish but not as well polished so it also looks black - actually this one looks more like the original Black Army.

Charcoal bluing was and is very pretty but not economical. The Black Army had a black blued finish instead of the lighter shade of polished charcoal blued finish that is of early GI M1911.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,065 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I know that when the Carbonia Blued reproduction came out, it was called "carbonia" but; and I am being pedantic here, "carbonia bluing" was a Smith & Wesson name for charcoal bluing back in the days.

The Black Army Reproduction has a matte blued finish that looks black.

The ANVIII actually had the charcoal blued finish but not as well polished so it also looks black - actually this one looks more like the original Black Army.

Charcoal bluing was and is very pretty but not economical. The Black Army had a black blued finish instead of the lighter shade of polished charcoal blued finish that is of early GI M1911.

The WW2 is Parkerized.

No if's, and's, or but's...Parkerized.

:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,400 Posts
I have the receipt for my grandfather’s M1911. He was an Army Signal Corps pilot when officers were required to purchase their own sidearms. The receipt was dated 1917. I never saw the pistol. I’m guessing it was sold during the Depression...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
628 Posts
Once upon a time, a friend gave me a worn out 1911. I removed the original barrel/bushing/link and hammer/sear/mainspring, putting them in a safe place. I hand fit a Kart barrel/bushing to the slide and fit a new hammer/sear/mainspring (roughed up the barrel and hammer to appear like the rest of the gun) and tightened up the frame to slide fit. Wanting to maintain the battle worn appearance, I left the sights alone. Save for the lesser quality sight picture, it shoots on par with my match grade 1911's. It attracted some attention at matches back in the day when I used to shoot single stack.
 

Attachments

·
Old timer
Joined
·
13,637 Posts
The WW2 is Parkerized.

No if's, and's, or but's...Parkerized.

:)
Preface: I AM ONLY REPEATING WHAT I HEARD!! I HAVE NO KNOWLEDGE OF TRUTH OR NOT, NOR DO I BENEFIT FROM IT IN ANY WAY!!

That said, from a conversation overheard at a LGS a long time ago (30 years or so):

The local gun guy was somewhat famous for his 1911 "prowess". Of course, I was duly impressed, being a young 20-something and just really getting into firearms myself, and it just so happened I was enamored first and foremost with John Browning's M1911. Anyway, another gentleman dropped in a presented what appeared to be a beautiful - but finely blued - 1911. The gentleman presented the firearm and asked if the old timer could offer some providence to the piece, as it had belonged to a relative who had recently passed, and that relative had reportedly told the gentleman that this very weapon was one he carried in battle during WWII and had somehow managed to keep after his service.

The older 1911 guy field disassembled it, looked it over, and declared that this was a civilian weapon, but one that had, in fact, been pressed into military service. As evidence, he showed two factors - engraved part numbers that matched the last three of the serial, and a cartouche on the frame that was the old cannonball cartouche found on Garands. He commented that it was exceptionally rare to find such a combination, and offered the gentleman $2,500 on the spot for the pistol, which to me meant the old 1911 guy genuinely believed what he was telling the gentleman. The gentleman considered it, then politely refused, stating he would keep it in the family and pass it down to his children.

I have, since that day, looked for another example like that one, and have yet to run across one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,065 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Once upon a time, a friend gave me a worn out 1911. I removed the original barrel/bushing/link and hammer/sear/mainspring, putting them in a safe place. I hand fit a Kart barrel/bushing to the slide and fit a new hammer/sear/mainspring (roughed up the barrel and hammer to appear like the rest of the gun) and tightened up the frame to slide fit. Wanting to maintain the battle worn appearance, I left the sights alone. Save for the lesser quality sight picture, it shoots on par with my match grade 1911's. It attracted some attention at matches back in the day when I used to shoot single stack.
Nice. Thanks for sharing it.

I don't doubt your accuracy info either.

The weirdest thing about my WW2 repro and the often ridiculed tiny sights is that I can see them (depends on lighting of course) a lot better than I thought I would, and the sight picture is VERY precise.

Better than a fiber optic or tritium, nope. But for range firing, or for, "in your face " distance, I'm betting this thing turns out to be pretty accurate.

Hopefully out to dance this weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,065 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Not all WW2 1911a1's were parkerized. The 500 Singers were all blued. And some early ones of other makes may have been blued as well.
Agreed.

Plus any holdovers from WW1 that didn't get a refit from an arsenal.

But this one...Parkerized.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,860 Posts
Here's my 1943 Colt 1911A1. Unlike so many of them it was never overhauled at an arsenal and has matching serial numbers on slide and frame. It was carried throughout Europe during WWII by Cpt. Edson Hammer in the holster pictured with it. He also carried it in Japan during the Korean War. He retired as a Lt. Colonel and kept his Colt until he was in his eighties.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,065 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Here's my 1943 Colt 1911A1. Unlike so many of them it was never overhauled at an arsenal and has matching serial numbers on slide and frame. It was carried throughout Europe during WWII by Cpt. Edson Hammer in the holster pictured with it. He also carried it in Japan during the Korean War. He retired as a Lt. Colonel and kept his Colt until he was in his eighties.


Scott, thanks for sharing it and the story of the owner. Was he a relative?
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top