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Kead bullets: anyone familiar with these?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Kwesi, Mar 19, 2017.

  1. Kwesi

    Kwesi

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    I dont load much lead but I do load 10mm and some 40 S&W:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. SJ 40

    SJ 40 Deplorable,Clinger

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    Not by that brand but the mold they come from yes. It's form the Magma 401180 TC. ,as I cast them from my mold and enjoy them in both .40 and 10 mm. SJ 40
     
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  3. Kwesi

    Kwesi

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    Thx! I'll need to research some lead loads. Was hoping someone is familiar with the hardness.
     
  4. dudel

    dudel

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    There is a hardness test you can do with lead pencils. Could be accurate enough for your needs.

    http://castboolits.gunloads.com/showthread.php?75455-Testing-hardness-with-pencils/page4

    Lead Hardness Testing using the Staedtler scale

    Staedtler Hardness Chart:
    8B Sheet lead
    7B
    6B Lead wire 5 BHN
    5B 40/1 lead / tin
    4B
    3B 1/20 tin/lead 10 BHN
    3B Clip-on WW
    2B Range scrap
    B 20/1 Lead / tin
    B Quenched range scrap
    B Air cooled WW
    B WW+2% tin
    HB Lyman #2 15 Bhn
    F Lyman #2
    F Commercial cast
    H 50/50 Lino /WW
    H Linotype 20 Bhn
    2H Quenched WW
    2H Monotype
    3H
    4H

    Rough BHN to Staedtler Hardness Conversion Chart:
    6B = Pure lead, about 5 BHN
    5B
    4B
    3B = 1in20 tin/lead alloy, age softened, about 10 BHN
    2B
    B
    HB = Lyman no 2 alloy, about 15 BHN
    H = Linotype, supposedly about 22 BHN, but that seems high
    2H
    3H
    4H

    Testing Protocol:
    The correct way of using the pencils is to find the softest pencil that will CUT INTO the surface. You should be able to see a tiny curl or chip of lead that is peeled out of the surface."

    Start by flattening a small section of the alloy surface with a file. The base of a large caliber bullet is sufficient. Peel the wood away from the graphite core of the pencil, which is a thin rod. Then sand the tip of that rod to a 90 degree angle by rubbing it across a sheet of 500 or 600 grit sandpaper while holding it straight up and down. If the pencil skids over the alloy surface, even if it leaves a slight scratch, its still not harder than the lead alloy.

    The hold the pencil at a 45 degree angle with the surface you are testing, and push down along the length of the pencil, as if you are trying to shove a knife point into the surface. If you try to push the pencil across the surface as if you are writing on in, you will get a much 'softer' result, because the edge won't be cutting into the surface, it will just be rubbing across the surface.

    Work your way up to progressively harder pencils, until you get to one where the sharp edge of the pencil "meplat" really digs into the surface, pushing up a curl or mound of alloy in front of it. At that point you stop and consider the hardest pencil that will not dig into the alloy in this manner, to be the "Staedtler" rating of the alloy in question.

    For example, my little store of 1in20 (tin-lead) alloy skids on a 3B but digs in on a 2B, therefore its Staedtler hardness is 3B. Some Hornady swaged lead bullets I have will skid on 4B but dig in on 3B, therefore the Staedtler hardness rating is 4B. I also suggest we stick to the Staedtler Mars Lumograph pencil sets, since the maker claims they conform to ASTM standard D-4236 for consistency. They are cheap and readily available at Office Depot and other stores.​
     
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  5. Kwesi

    Kwesi

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    Thanks dudel
     
  6. dudel

    dudel

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    No problem. Art supply shops are a good source for pencils.