Just a few questions

Discussion in 'Hunting, Fishing & Camping' started by doktarZues, Dec 12, 2005.

  1. doktarZues

    doktarZues I'm anti-anti

    Messages:
    1,605
    Likes Received:
    72
    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2003
    Location:
    Brevard County, FL
    I realize these questions could likely very by state, so if you reply say your state or if you think it might be federal, etc.

    1. Say you own a lot of land somewhere, say 150 acres. Can you hunt on that land without the proper license and tags? Or do you need a tag regardless?

    2. Are game wardens allowed to patrol on private land? If they are, what if you have it fenced all the way around? I doubt it's common but I know there are very large private properties (hundreds of acres or more) that have very sturdy fencing around the entire property. Could a game warden hop a fence with a no tresspassing sign posted every 50 feet and come on your property?

    3. Going along with question 2 are there any laws about fencing large areas of wilderness property? I realize most big acreage real-estate deals have "wildlife" and "nature" clauses attached to them in order to get a better deal or keep your taxes low, but let's assume there are no obligations to the government on your land, just deeded property.

    Thanks in advance

    dok
     
  2. noway

    noway

    Messages:
    8,735
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2000
    Location:
    Davie "Cowboy" , FL
    (FLA since this where your are )

    1> You don't need a hunting license if you are hunting on your own immediate homestead or a direct relatives. I think you will need doe tags but you will need more than 150acres to apply or have adjacent acres from your neighbors combine and then you can apply. Also because it is your land, you still have to follow the states rules on bags limits, sexes of game,etc........

    2> Same as what anything, the FWC needs PC ( probable cause ) or a search warrant to come on your land (period). Now from what I gather, hunting camps/clubs or whatever you want to call them have permits establish by the state and by accepting that permit/license you grant the gamewarden access to your club/camp.BUT in your case it should not apply. If they get a shot fired at night or a spotlighting report on land X they have reason PC to investigate. Also if they see a person(s) traveling over a fenced posted property they have PC to investigate that person(s) if they feel that they are not approve or illegally travel such and such fence.


    3> None that I know of, just check the FLA statue section 810.XXXs for any fencing posting rules for trepass and you should be okay , also look into your county ordinaces. They all have silly rules on spacing of signs, corners,changes in fence-lines,color of signs, etcs.....

    btw: you should really be asking the above to your local/region FWC office.
     

  3. vafish

    vafish

    Messages:
    16,750
    Likes Received:
    234
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2003
    Location:
    Commonwealth of Virginia
    Pretty much the same for VA.

    On your own land (no size limit so techinically even my 1/4 acre lot in suburbia counts) you can hunt without a license. Still have to check the deer though, but the new phone in system makes that real easy.

    Game Wardens are Law Enforcement officers, they need to follow all the rules the cops do.
     
  4. lomfs24

    lomfs24

    Messages:
    2,388
    Likes Received:
    144
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2003
    Location:
    Montana
    These laws apply to Montana.

    1. The game animals are property of the State. So therefore, you need to have a license to hunt even on your own property. The tag has to stay with the carcass until most of it is gone. Which means you have to have the tag in your freezer for a while.

    2. As was mentioned, Game Wardens are law enforcement and they have to follow the same rules that any other LEO has to follow. They cannot tresspass on your property.

    3. I am not sure if I follow your question. You cannot fence large areas of public property. However, if your property borders public land you can fence your property. However, if you have large acreages (some large ranches here are in the 10 of thousands of acres) you do not have to fence your property. However, you cannot get mad at your neighbor for his livestock getting onto your property if you don't have it fenced.

    As a sidenote to fencing here, If you were to stand on your property line facing your neighbors property and your neighbor were to do the same at the centerline of said properties, your responsibility to fence would lay to your right and your neighbors would lay to his right.


    As a side note to the question number 1, here in Montana there was a rancher around Lewistown that shot(read poach if you will) a bunch(somewhere between 10 and 100) of deer on his property because they were causing damage to his property. The FWP filed charges against him. He filed counter charges for damage the States deer caused pending the outcome of the charges filed against him. Basically, he was trying to make the State say that they owned the deer, then he would say that their deer caused damage on his property that the State would have to pay for. The whole case was suspended pending futher investigation and was never reopened.
     
  5. noway

    noway

    Messages:
    8,735
    Likes Received:
    8
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2000
    Location:
    Davie "Cowboy" , FL
    { Basically, he was trying to make the State say that they owned the deer, then he would say that their deer caused damage on his property that the State would have to pay for. The whole case was suspended pending futher investigation and was never reopened.}

    I 've heard the same but mainly with hogs wheer they killed them and the state try to bring charges up but theu counter using the same tactics. Don't know the outcome but it looks like it is doable. And using Denny Crain line, with money you can just about win anything when it comes to lawyers and the law ;)