judo good for self defense?

Discussion in 'The Martial Arts Forum' started by AWMP, Sep 4, 2011.

  1. Deputydave

    Deputydave Millennium Member

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  2. Edge

    Edge Millennium Member

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    Frankly, I think someone should study and extract the best techniques from all of the arts. my black belt is in gojuryu, but I started off in judo and studied a whole bunch of different ones on the way.

    Related to the Olympic medalist getting "beat up". I'd want to know the circumstances surrounding that more. was he drunk, totally unaware of surroundings and taken by surprise, etc.

    As to taking on more than one opponent at a time. Friend who took his black belt test same time I did was jumped by four guys and successfully defended himself; but no one should count on being able to do that. circumstances just worked out for him that time. if they'd been slightly different, they might not have. I've sparred multiple opponents many times and it is flat out hard work even if you're in great shape. even if you're "fighting" several, you need to move so you're actually just dealing with one at any moment.

    One should practice with weapons too. you may not farewell going empty handed to a knife or gunfight. I've practiced knife and gun defenses big time (and have scars to prove it) and know I'd have a legitimate chance of disarming someone if they're close, but I'd much prefer to stay out of range and use my own weapon or not play at all.

    Finally, I think the training itself is one of the big advantages. being physically fit, being alert and being conditioned to respond are huge. A friend and fellow student was a state police swat team member. one time we were talking and he said that most of the drunks and thugs he had to deal with on the job appeared to be going slow motion after working out with us in the dojo all the time.
     

  3. fg17

    fg17

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    This is the most important thing. Whatever art you train you need to train against resistance. All sport based martial arts do this. This is were many traditional and reality based martial arts fall short.
     
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  4. TheDreadnought

    TheDreadnought

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    Everybody who is anybody studies Krav Maga in full tactical gear these days. :mallninja:

    I have a black belt in Tae Kwon Do and its been helpful on a couple occasions with basic blocks and strikes. But I wouldn't consider it a super effective combat system. Although I can't fault it for keeping me from getting hurt when I needed it.

    I've done some fencing, just in case I ever find myself in a random sword fight. :duel: Seems to happen all the time in the movies.

    But these days I focus on America's martial art. Gunfighting. :2gun:
     
  5. fg17

    fg17

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    This 100%. There is so much BS being spewed in the so called RBSD world it's unbelievable. Google bullshido.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2016
  6. MinervaDoe

    MinervaDoe

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    Judo is a sport which does a very good job of letting you go all out against an opponent.
    I personally think judo is a very good foundation for a martial art (I did it for one year and wrestled for two).
    Myself, I practiced aikido for twelve years, but I also used to work on punching and kicking a heavy bag and a speed bag on the side. Also, a friend of mine had a black belt in aikido and tai kwan do and we used to spar.
    My father in law (8th dan) ran his own dojo in korean karate for forty years, and we got to BS'ing one night and it was amusing to hear him say that he would not want to fight a wrestler.
     
  7. glock collector

    glock collector

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    I had the privilege of grappling with a 3 time mma world contender this summer and from a boxing and karate background it was a hoot. I spent time laughing as I'm getting my arse wooped.
     
  8. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    Gojuryu-- Mas Oyama , I believe went on from there

    It was Full Contact
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2016
  9. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    A larger "red neck" tried to screw with one of my sons.
    He landed badly knocked the air out of him.
    My son looked down and said, I am sorry, you
    did not how to fall.
     
  10. peng

    peng

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    gun > knife > judo > nothing.
     
  11. hurley842002

    hurley842002

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    Was just talking about Judo at work earlier. One of my Co-Workers is a 7th degree black belt and has won several Olympic medals. She trains Olympic, Kodokan, and freestyle, and will let Co-Workers and family train for free, so I'm thinking about starting Judo with my two sons. I've done a bit of Krav, and some BJJ, but can no longer afford to participate with myself and two sons, so this seems like a good alternative financially.
     
  12. DrVlad

    DrVlad Millennium Member

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    As the saying goes, "If you are fighting fair, your tactics suck". As Deputydave said, "Under duress you will react the same way you train." So, if you train in a sport, pad up, fight with rules, are used to having referees, etc, , then in a SD situation on the street, under extreme duress, you are likely to perform exactly the same way you train. I once heard an old Japanese master sum it up this way; " There is a VERY big difference between sport karate and self defense karate. Sport karate is about winning, self defense karate is about NOT LOSING." Very often, self defense is all about delivering a single very powerful, very effective, (possibly highly damaging) technique and thus allowing you to the escape and evade your opponent....not about standing toe to toe in battle as is often depicted in movies and on TV.

    Many good points have been made here reguarding the fact that all styles of martial arts teach balance and body awareness as well as improve physical fitness. In our style of training we often elude to the fact that in a conflict, both opponents being of relatively equal skill, the one that is more in shape has a very large advantage. Physical fitness counts in self defense!

    I have trained mostly in striking styles with less time spent grappling. In my experience grappling techniques take more time to effectively master than striking techniques. A poorly delivered strike can still be effective enough to stun your opponent and allow escape, but an improper grapple or throw now puts you in close range with your opponent, now affording them an opportunity to grapple or strike back. For that reason, I consider learning a striking SD style superior to grappling styles for basic self defense. The student will more quickly learn the basic techniques needed for rudimentary self defense. That's why when we teach "Self defense" classes to novices we teach basic striking techniques. However, that being said, if the student intends to train diligently with ANY style and learns to master the style, any style becomes exceedingly effective as for self defense. So generalized statements on which style is best do depend somewhat on you intent on either committing to a style long term vs simply taking a few classes to learn the basics.

    In my opinion, learning basic striking, eye gouges, groin strikes and other high yield strikes is easier than learning to be effective with a judo throw or a grappling hold, the latter two simply taking more time to master.
     
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  13. lethal tupperwa

    lethal tupperwa

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    then there is chair
    the one the little guy picks up and wears out the big guy trying to hurt them.
     
  14. crockett

    crockett

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    1st Dan in German Jiu-Jitsu here (mixture of Judo, Karate, Aikido, Thai boxing and Taekwondo). In a fist or even knife fight it is very helpful, not so much when firearms come to play unless the opponent gets very close and can be distracted. I rather walk out of any confrontation or rely on my G42.
     
  15. taffbanjo

    taffbanjo The Limey

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    Quite right - judo is a sport with its own quite restrictive rules. Great for fitness, endurance and general mobility, though.
     
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  16. fg17

    fg17

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    Your as wrong about judo as you are about hunting. A good judoka would drop most RBSD/Krav maga/commando killers on their heads.
     
  17. Deputydave

    Deputydave Millennium Member

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    Odd that the highest ranked non-Japanese Judoka in the world of the WWII era came to the exact opposite conclusion. And then went on to help develop a realistic, real world proven combat system that included ZERO Judo.

    Your assessment is based on biased emotion and not factual data. You may want to reread the thread in it's entirety including the links before commenting.
     
  18. Deputydave

    Deputydave Millennium Member

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  19. ChuteTheMall

    ChuteTheMall Wallbuilder and Weapon Bearer

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    Dismissing any martial art merely because it is also a sport insures a lack of practice opportunities against a variety of opponents in a variety of locations.

    Depending on any martial sport without also mastering it's combat applications leads to getting your ass kicked or killed by someone who isn't playing.

    It's a yin-yang thing. Don't master one without the other.
     
  20. Deputydave

    Deputydave Millennium Member

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    Judo isn't also a sport, it is only a sport. It was specifically designed to be a sport from Aiki Jujutsu. As a sport it thus follows the sport training methodology. This is inherently disadvantageous for self defense for all the reasons listed in the links I've provided above. That's why it wasn't included in RBSD systems like WWII combatives or CQDT.

    Doesn't mean Judo sucks, only that while it works well for one specific venue it doesn't work for another. It was meant for sport, not SD. If you want Judo to be for SD then you have to go past Judo and learn it's Aiki Jujutsu principles. Apples and oranges.