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Violence of action, speed and surprise will help keep you alive on the military battlefield and they will also help keep you alive as a police officer or civilian. Very good video, you would be surprised what a person can do even after they're shot, even with 7.62 or 5.56. Never stop fighting until they are dead or you are dead.
 

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One thing that was revealed to me in the video is how the body isn't quickly stopped by bullets that hit non critical areas of the body...adrenaline and mindset are beasts!
Plus there is a lot of non vital realestate on a bad guy. The bigger the bad guy, the more non vital territory.
 
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Not only that, but he said the .45 was loaded with FMJ, which tend to do less damage than HP.
 
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This video makes you rethink caliber however, shot placement, and we can see it maybe hard to get in a gunfight. In a shooting it is not as difficult to get because you are firing all the rounds. I would still rather have a larger caliber though.
 

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Yet again, lessons to be learned or reinforced by these accounts. Good guy unleashed 14 rounds (G22), connected seven times, took seven hits (wearing armor). Bad guy fired 12 rounds (G21). Gunfight lasted 4-6 seconds by good guy’s estimate.

Lesson Numero Uno: capacity.

"I am a huge capacity person. If I would have had a single stack gun…I would have had to reload…and that reload probably would have cost me my life. It’s a 4-6 second gunfight…I can reload in under two seconds, but that’s almost 50% of the damn gunfight that I would have wasted reloading. Keeping up the fight and keeping that gun going is a big deal." No truer words.
 

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This video makes you rethink caliber however, shot placement, and we can see it maybe hard to get in a gunfight. In a shooting it is not as difficult to get because you are firing all the rounds. I would still rather have a larger caliber though.
Huh?
 

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Millenium #3936
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Firstly.. this officer is a BA on many levels and I admire the heck out of him.

I think that a good many people try to analyze combat in far too critical a fashion. Combat is made up of many elements and so is winning or losing. Each conflict is a roll of the dice and although certain advantages in training, knowledge, experience, capabilities and position may seemingly tilt many issues in your favor.. happenstance can still be the prevailing factor. It is a miracle that he survived the very first shot. It could have very easily gone the other way and ended right there, but it didn't.

This officer had amazing fortitude and mental grit. He also had the skill to get things done under the worst possible conditions. I don't think this is a JHP/FMJ issue at all and I don't think its a caliber war. I think that people need to reframe from bringing their television and video game ideas of gun fighting into things that are considered "reality". What is described here is a real gun fight between a good guy and a true predator. The take-away here has nothing to do with bullets, it has to do with fighting spirit. You guys who are looking for a fix to this situation are missing the boat in my estimation.
 

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Wow that was sobering.
It would have been much handier to have known that you were in a gun fight before you were hit several times, and severely injured. Without good body armor this would not have turned out well at all either.
This was a wake up call on what can happen when you do not expect a problem to develop. The Second Chance Deep Cover Vest I normally wore would not have cut it in this gun fight. Two of the shots would have went through the carrier, and the center chest shot with no trauma plate would have left a bruise the size of a dinner plate, if the shot did not stop your heart. If I had of watched this before I retired I would have been wearing a lot more serious body armor than I was.

Bob R
 

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One thing that was revealed to me in the video is how the body isn't quickly stopped by bullets that hit non critical areas of the body...adrenaline and mindset are beasts!
This is exactly why I keep preaching high velocity shock producing calibers and ammo. As he said multiple hits with the heavy slow 180gr bullet did little to stop the attack and without a CNS hit this is exactly what would be expected to happen. ONLY a direct hit to the CNS or the shock/energy dump from a fast powerful round (think 357 Mag) will stop a gun fight fast enough to keep you from getting killed.

There were almost 30 shots fired total, if this had happened in a mall or store the chance of a bystander getting shot would have been high while these two blasted away with their slow heavy rounds hoping for a lucky hit.
 

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Millenium #3936
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Brother... shooting someone in the foot with a "heavy slow 180gr bullet" can easily be a man stopper. Getting shot just about anywhere can be a man stopper and in most cases,..being shot changes the channels of the attacker. I agree that there is a point where the size and power of a projectile can be a realistic consideration but I think its a mistake to focus narrowly on the fantastical circumstances rather than plain ole common sense. Shot placement is important and so is accepting that human beings are a little more resilient than television and movies often depict. The fight aint over till its over. I wont do any hand wringing over common calibers from .380 and up. I am confident that I can make it work.
 
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Violence of action, speed and surprise will help keep you alive on the military battlefield and they will also help keep you alive as a police officer or civilian. Very good video, you would be surprised what a person can do even after they're shot, even with 7.62 or 5.56. Never stop fighting until they are dead or you are dead.
Spot on, sir.

As part of our training program, we talk about a concept that we named "the personal gunfight" ; that is, regardless of who someone is- military operator, police patrol officer, or concealed carrier- in the 2 to 7 seconds that comprise the microcosm of a sudden armed encounter with a handgun, everyone has the exact same priorities in play to win that fight: getting the pistol out and on target and making effective hits quickly....while individual mission, the actions taken before and after those few seconds, etc, are different (for instance, an LEO is going to be apprehension oriented, and their immediate actions after the shooting may be to secure the suspect and render aid , while a private citizen carrying concealed may be be getting to a place of greater safety and calling 911) , everyone, during those few seconds, are doing roughly the same things, within the way they were trained; preparedness and training are key to shortening the reaction times involved, and lead to a greater ability to win the fight.

The posted video is a good one, thanks to the OP for posting it.
 

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Holy crap, that video was powerful. It drove several lessons home, like making sure I carry JHP rounds and making sure I can plant several rounds into bad guy’s mid-brain or sever his spinal cord.
 
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